Júbilo Iwata

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Júbilo Iwata
ジュビロ磐田
JubiloIwata.png
Full nameJúbilo Iwata
Nickname(s)Júbilo
Founded1972;49 years ago (1972)
Ground Yamaha Stadium,
Iwata, Shizuoka
Capacity15,165 [1]
Owner Yamaha Motor Company
ChairmanYoshirou Takahira
Manager Masakazu Suzuki
League J2 League
2020 J2 League, 6th
Website Club website
Soccerball current event.svg Current season

Júbilo Iwata (Japanese: ジュビロ磐田, Hepburn: Jubiro Iwata) is a professional Japanese association football team that currently play in the J2 League. The team name Júbilo means 'joy' in Spanish and Portuguese. The team's hometown is Iwata, Shizuoka prefecture and they play at Yamaha Stadium. For big fixtures such as the Shizuoka Derby with Shimizu S-Pulse and against some of the top teams in J1, Júbilo play at the much larger Ecopa Stadium in Fukuroi City, a venue built specifically for the 2002 FIFA World Cup finals. They practice at Okubo Ground in Iwata and Iwata Sports Park Yumeria. [2]

Contents

Between 1997 and 2003 Iwata were one of the most successful teams in the J. League. Over this seven-year spell Jubilo finished outside the top two of J1 just once, winning the league title on three occasions. This period also saw a number of cup final appearances, including winning the Emperor’s Cup, the J. League Cup, and the Asian Champions League once each.

History

Origins and rise to the top

The team started out as the company team for Yamaha Motor Corporation in 1970. After making its way through the Shizuoka and Tōkai football leagues, it played in the Japan Soccer League until it reorganized as the J.League at the end of 1992.

Their first glory happened when they won both the Emperor's Cup and promotion as champions of the JSL Division 2 in 1982. They won their first Japanese league title in the 1987/88 season. Due to problems in the upcoming professionalization, Yamaha decided to relegate themselves and not be one of the J.League founder members.

They finished in 2nd place of the JFL 1st division, a division below the top flight, in 1993 and were promoted to the J1 league for 1994. The team welcomed Marius Johan Ooft as its manager, as well as the Brazilian national team captain Dunga and a number of foreign players to build a winning team. [3] Dunga's football philosophy deeply influenced the club, initially as a player and currently as an advisor.

Glory years

In a seven-year period between 1997 and 2003, the club won a number of titles relying on Japanese players instead of foreigners who may leave on a transfer during the middle of the season. Within this period Júbilo won the J.League title three times, finished second three more and won each of the domestic cup competitions once. In 1999 they were also crowned Champions of Asia after winning the final match against Esteghlal F.C. and 121.000 spectators in Azadi Stadium.

In one of the most fruitful periods in J.League history, Júbilo broke several records and created some new ones. Amongst these are the most goals scored in a season (107 in 1998); the fewest goals conceded in a season (26 in 2001); the biggest goal difference (plus 68 goals in 1998); and the largest win (9–1 against Cerezo Osaka in 1998). [4] In 2002, the team won both stages of the championship, a first in J.League history, and the same year the team had a record seven players selected for the J.League Team of the Year. All of these records still stand today.

Today

Yamaha Stadium Jubilo Iwata Yamahastafium05161.JPG
Yamaha Stadium Júbilo Iwata

Since their last cup triumph in the 2003 Emperor's Cup, the squad which took them to such heights began to age. Without similarly skilled replacements coming through the youth team or from outside, Júbilo's power started to fade, and in 2007 the club ended the season in a record worst position of 9th. Perhaps more concerning to Júbilo supporters is their eclipse in recent seasons by bitter local rivals Shimizu S-Pulse who, in ending the season above Júbilo every year since 2006, have become Shizuoka prefecture's premier performing team. In 2008 they finished 16th out of 18 – their lowest position in the 18-club table – but kept their J1 position by defeating Vegalta Sendai in the promotion/relegation playoff.

In 2013 season, it took them until 8th week to make their first win in the league matches, and never move up higher than 16th since they were ranked down to 17th as of the end of 5th week. Then eventually suffered their first relegation to 2014 J.League Division 2 after they were defeated by Sagan Tosu at their 31st week match. Júbilo were promoted back to J1 in 2015 after finishing runners-up.

Honours

Domestic

Júbilo Iwata (Professional era)

Yamaha (Amateur era)

 

International

Rivalries

Júbilo's closest professional rivals are S-Pulse from Shizuoka. [5] Júbilo also has rivalries with Kashima Antlers and Yokohama Marinos, with whom they traded the Japanese league championship since the late 1980s. During the Japan Soccer League days they had a more local derby with Honda, across the Tenryu in Hamamatsu, but as Honda has long resisted professionalism, competitive matches between them since 1994 are a rarity.

Record as J.League member

ChampionsRunners-upThird place Promoted Relegated
SeasonDiv.TeamsPos.Attendance/G J.League Cup Emperor's
Cup
Asia
1994 J1128th14,497Final1st round
1995 146th17,3132nd round
1996 164th13,792Group Stage3rd round
1997 171st10,448FinalSemi-final
1998 182nd12,867WinnerQuarter-final
1999 161st12,273Quarter-finalQuarter-final CC Winner
2000 164th12,534Quarter-finalQuarter-final CC Final
2001 162nd16,650Final4th round CC Final
2002 161st16,564Quarter-finalQuarter-final
2003 162nd17,267Semi-finalWinner
2004 165th17,126Group StageFinal CL Group Stage
2005 186th17,296Quarter-finalQuarter-final CL Group Stage
2006 185th18,002Quarter-finalQuarter-final
2007 189th16,359Group Stage5th round
2008 1816th15,465Group Stage5th round
2009 1811th13,523Group Stage4th round
2010 1811th12,137Winner4th round
2011 188th11,796Quarter-final3rd round
2012 1812th13,122Group stage4th round
2013 1817th10,895Group stageQuarter-final
2014 J2224th8,7743rd round
2015 222nd10,0412nd round
2016 J11813th14,611Group Stage3rd round
2017 186th16,321Group StageQuarter-final
2018 1816th15,474Play-off StageQuarter-final
2019 1818th15,277Play-off Stage4th round
2020 J2226th3,214Did not qualify
Key

Players

Current squad

As of 21 February 2021 [6]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No.Pos.NationPlayer
1 GK Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Naoki Hatta
2 MF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Yasuyuki Konno
3 DF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Kentaro Oi
4 FW Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Yuki Otsu
5 DF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Daiki Ogawa
8 MF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Kotaro Omori
9 FW Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Koki Ogawa
10 MF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Hiroki Yamada
11 FW Flag of Brazil.svg  BRA Lukian
13 MF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Kotaro Fujikawa
14 MF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Masaya Matsumoto
15 MF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Hiroki Ito
17 MF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Yuto Suzuki
19 FW Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Naoto Miki
21 GK Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Daichi Sugimoto
No.Pos.NationPlayer
22 DF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN So Nakagawa
23 MF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Kosuke Yamamoto
25 DF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Riku Morioka
27 FW Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Mahiro Yoshinaga
28 MF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Naoki Kanuma
29 FW Flag of Colombia.svg  COL Fabián González
30 MF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Naoya Seita
35 DF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Kaito Suzuki
36 GK Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Ryuki Miura
37 GK Flag of Moldova.svg  MDA Alexei Koșelev
38 DF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Norimichi Yamamoto
41 DF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Chiharu Kato
44 DF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Shun Obu
50 MF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Yasuhito Endo (On loan from Gamba Osaka)

Out on loan

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No.Pos.NationPlayer
MF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Takeaki Harigaya (On loan at Giravanz Kitakyushu)
MF Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Rikiya Uehara (On loan at Vegalta Sendai)

World Cup players

The following players have been selected by their country in the World Cup, while playing for Júbilo Iwata:

Award winners

The following players have won the awards while at Júbilo Iwata:

Club captains

Former players

Players with senior international caps:

JFA.
AFC/ CAF/ OFC.
UEFA.
CONMEBOL.

Managers

ManagerTenure
StartFinish
Flag of Japan.svg Tadanori Arata [7]
Flag of Japan.svg Ryuichi Sugiyama 19741987
Flag of Japan.svg Kikuo Konagaya 19871992
Flag of Japan.svg Kazuaki Nagasawa 19921993
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Hans Ooft 19941996
Flag of Brazil.svg Luiz Felipe Scolari 19971997
Flag of Japan.svg Takashi Kuwahara 1997
Flag of Brazil.svg Valmir 1998
Flag of Japan.svg Takashi Kuwahara 1999
Flag of North Macedonia.svg Gjoko Hadžievski 2000
Flag of Japan.svg Masakazu Suzuki 20022003
Flag of Japan.svg Masaaki Yanagishita 2003
Flag of Japan.svg Masakazu Suzuki 2004
Flag of Japan.svg Masakuni Yamamoto 20042006
Flag of Brazil.svg Adílson Batista 20062007
Flag of Japan.svg Atsushi Uchiyama 20072008
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Hans Ooft 2008
Flag of Japan.svg Masaaki Yanagishita 20092011
Flag of Japan.svg Hitoshi Morishita 20122013
Flag of Japan.svg Tetsu Nagasawa 2013
Flag of Japan.svg Takashi Sekizuka 2013
Flag of Brazil.svg Péricles Chamusca 2014
Flag of Japan.svg Hiroshi Nanami 20142019

In the Captain Tsubasa manga series, three characters was players of Júbilo Iwata. The midfielders Taro Misaki and Hanji Urabe, and the defender Ryo Ishizaki.

Related Research Articles

Iwata, Shizuoka City in Chūbu, Japan

Iwata is a city located in Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan. As of 1 May 2019, the city had an estimated population of 169,897 in 68,215 households and a population density was 1,000 persons per km2. The total area of the city was 163.45 square kilometres (63.11 sq mi). Iwata is widely known as the headquarters of the Yamaha Motor Corporation. Iwata is also home to Júbilo Iwata, a J. League soccer team, as well as Yamaha Jubilo, a rugby team.

Shimizu S-Pulse Football club

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Yamaha Júbilo

Yamaha Júbilo is a rugby union team based in Iwata, Shizuoka, Japan. The team came second behind Toshiba Brave Lupus in the second season of Japanese rugby's Top League (2004–05). They were coached by former All Black Grant Batty and Fijian player-coach Tabai Matson. Founded in 1984, its name was "Yamaha Motors Rugby Football Club".

Masashi Nakayama

Masashi Nakayama is a Japanese football manager and former player who is the head coach of Júbilo Iwata. He played as a forward in his playing career. Born in Shizuoka, Nakayama attended Fujieda Higashi High School and University of Tsukuba before he joined Yamaha Motors of the Japan Soccer League, a precursor to the J1 League, which consisted of company sponsored teams. He retired in December 2012 at age 45 after playing 3 seasons for Consadole Sapporo, then he came back almost three years later with Azul Claro Numazu in Japan Football League, the club has been promoted to the J3 League since 2017. He also attends by the nickname Gon Nakayama.

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Shizuoka derby

The Shizuoka Derby is a commonly occurring football fixture in Japan. The game takes place between the two professional J. League teams in Shizuoka Prefecture; Shimizu S-Pulse and Júbilo Iwata. The game is usually hosted at Ecopa Stadium, the prefecture's largest sporting venue. In the two 2007 J-League season meetings, S-Pulse triumphed both times. Firstly 2–1 at Nihondaira Stadium in May, and then 1–0 in September at Ecopa.

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Takashi Fukunishi is a former Japanese football player. He played for Japan national team.

Toshihiro Hattori is a former Japanese football player. He played for Japan national team.

Hideto Suzuki is a former Japanese football player and manager. He played for Japan national team.

Ryoichi Maeda Japanese footballer

Ryoichi Maeda is a Japanese football player who plays for FC Gifu. He played for Japan national team.

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Norihisa Shimizu is a former Japanese football player.

Yasumasa Nishino is a former Japanese football player.

Kiyokazu Kudo is a former Japanese football player.

Toshihiro Yoshimura is a former Japanese football player.

1997 Júbilo Iwata season

Wataru Murata is a former Japanese rugby player and coach. He played as scrum-half. He currently coaches Senshu University Rugby Football Club.

Seiya Nakano is a Japanese football player for Júbilo Iwata.

References

  1. "Club guide: Júbilo Iwata". J.League. Archived from the original on January 9, 2015. Retrieved January 24, 2015.
  2. ヤマハ大久保グラウンド [Yamaha Okubo Ground] (in Japanese). Júbilo Iwata. Retrieved January 24, 2015.
  3. "Brazilian Players: A Long Association with Japanese Soccer". nippon.com. Retrieved 2 February 2016.
  4. "J.League Date Site". J.League Official Site. Retrieved 2 February 2016.
  5. "DERBY DAY DRAMAS IN THE J.LEAGUE". oneworldsports.com. Archived from the original on 12 September 2014. Retrieved 2 February 2016.
  6. "トップチーム選手 | 選手&スタッフ". ジュビロ磐田 Jubilo IWATA (in Japanese). Retrieved 21 February 2021.
  7. 磐田黄金時代の社長・荒田氏が死去 [Former Iwata chairman Tadanori Arata dies] (in Japanese). Sankei Sports. 13 November 2013. Retrieved 8 February 2016.
Achievements
Preceded by
Pohang Steelers
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Champions of Asia
1998–99
Succeeded by
Al Hilal
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