J. Bradford DeLong

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J. Bradford DeLong
Brad DeLong 201010.jpg
DeLong in October 2010
Born
James Bradford DeLong

(1960-06-24) June 24, 1960 (age 62)
Boston, Massachusetts, United States
NationalityAmerican
Institution University of California, Berkeley
Field Macroeconomics
School or
tradition
New Keynesian economics
Alma materB.A. (1982), M.A. (1985), Ph.D. (1987), Harvard University
Influences Adam Smith
John Maynard Keynes
Milton Friedman
Lawrence Summers
Andrei Shleifer
Information at IDEAS / RePEc

James Bradford "Brad" DeLong (born June 24, 1960) is an economic historian who is a professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley. DeLong served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Treasury in the Clinton Administration under Lawrence Summers. [1]

Contents

Education

DeLong graduated from Harvard College in 1982, and also received an M.A. and a Ph.D. in economics also from Harvard. [2] He then taught economics at universities in the Boston area, including MIT, Boston University, and Harvard University, from 1987 to 1993. He was a John M. Olin Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research in 1991–1992.[ citation needed ]

Career

DeLong joined UC Berkeley as an associate professor in 1993. [3] From April 1993 to May 1995, he served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Economic Policy at the U.S. Department of the Treasury in Washington, D.C. As an official in the Treasury Department in the Clinton administration, he worked on the 1993 federal budget, the unsuccessful health care reform effort, and other policies, and on several trade issues, including the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade and the North American Free Trade Agreement. He became a full professor at Berkeley in 1997 and has been there ever since.[ citation needed ]

DeLong has been a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, and an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow. [4]

Along with Joseph Stiglitz and Aaron Edlin, DeLong is co-editor of The Economists' Voice , [5] and has been co-editor of the Journal of Economic Perspectives . He is also the author of a textbook, Macroeconomics, the second edition of which he coauthored with Martha Olney. He co-edited (with Heather Boushey and Marshall Steinbaum) the book After Piketty: The Agenda for Economics and Inequality (2017), a volume of 22 essays about how to integrate inequality into economic thinking. He also contributes to Project Syndicate. [6]

In 1990 and 1991, DeLong and Lawrence Summers co-wrote two theoretical papers that became critical theoretical underpinnings for the financial deregulation put in place when Summers was Secretary of the Treasury under Bill Clinton.

In 2019, DeLong said that he and other neoliberals had been "certainly wrong, 100 percent, on the politics" of economic policies. While he continued to believe that "good incremental policies" might be superior, he concluded that they were politically unattainable because of the lack of Republicans willing to work toward such goals. Instead, DeLong said, he favored "Medicare-for-all, funded by a carbon tax, with a whole bunch of Universal Basic Income rebates for the poor and public investment in green technologies." He concluded, "The world appears to be more like what lefties thought it was than what I thought it was for the last 10 or 15 years." [7]

DeLong is an active blogger on political and economic issues and media criticism. [8]

Personal life

DeLong lives in Berkeley, California, [9] with his wife, Ann Marie Marciarille, [10] a professor of law (specializing in healthcare law) at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. [11]

Publications

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References

  1. Lowrey, Annie (2022-09-03). "The Economist Who Knows the Miracle Is Over". The Atlantic. Retrieved 2022-09-04.
  2. "Vitae: J. Bradford DeLong". National Bureau of Economic Research. Retrieved 12 March 2015.
  3. "J. Bradford DeLong". University of California, Berkeley. Retrieved 12 March 2015.
  4. "This Is Brad DeLong's Grasping Reality...: Brad DeLong's Short Biography" . Retrieved 2014-04-28.
  5. "The Economists' Voice". Bepress.com. Retrieved 2014-04-28.
  6. "J. Bradford DeLong". Project Syndicate. Retrieved 2021-03-21.
  7. Beauchamp, Zack (March 4, 2019). "A Clinton-era centrist Democrat explains why it's time to give democratic socialists a chance". Vox . Vox Media . Retrieved 2019-12-01.
  8. David Wessel, In Fed We Trust: Ben Bernanke's War on the Great Panic, page 4. Crown Business, 2009.
  9. "A $1.12 Million Bet on the Berkeley, CA Housing Market". This Is Brad DeLong's Grasping Reality... 2012-01-23. Retrieved 2014-04-28.
  10. "One Page Biography James Bradford DeLong". Brad DeLong. Archived from the original on 2010-06-24. Retrieved 2010-10-20.
  11. "Ann Marie Marciarille » Faculty Directory - UMKC School of Law". law.umkc.edu. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
  12. "Brad DeLong : J. Bradford DeLong's Academic CV". Delong.typepad.com. Retrieved 2014-04-28.