Jack Davies (screenwriter)

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Jack Davies (25 November 1913 22 June 1994) was an English screenwriter, producer, editor and actor.

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Davies was prolific comedy screenwriter. His 48 credits include films starring comedians Will Hay and Norman Wisdom. He was nominated for an Oscar for his work on Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines . [1]

His eldest son John Howard Davies was a successful child actor and BBC television executive.

Selected filmography

Selected Television Credits

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References

  1. "The 38th Academy Awards (1966) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on 2015-01-11. Retrieved 2011-08-24.