Jack Greenhalgh

Last updated
Jack Greenhalgh
Born
Jack Greenhalgh

(1904-07-23)July 23, 1904
DiedSeptember 3, 1971(1971-09-03) (aged 67)
NationalityAmerican
Occupation Cinematographer
Years active1926 1953

Jack Greenhalgh (July 23, 1904 – September 3, 1971) was an American cinematographer, part of the Classical Hollywood cinema generation. He shot Billy the Kid in Santa Fe (1941), Gangster's Den (1945), Too Many Winners (1947) among others. He was active from 1926-53. [1] [2] [3]

Contents

Selected filmography

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References

  1. Sam Staggs (17 February 2009). Born to Be Hurt: The Untold Story of Imitation of Life. St. Martin's Press. pp. 83–. ISBN   978-1-4299-4208-9.
  2. Jerry Vermilye (29 April 2014). Buster Crabbe: A Biofilmography. McFarland. pp. 137–. ISBN   978-0-7864-5180-7.
  3. American Cinematographer. ASC Holding Corporation. 1970.