Jack Grundy (rugby league)

Last updated

John J. Grundy
Personal information
Full nameJohn James Grundy
Born27 August 1926
Prescot, England
Died1978 (aged 5152)
Barrow-in-Furness, England
Playing information
Position Second-row
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1948–50 St. Helens 2411839
1950–61 Barrow 37411210338
Total398113190377
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
Lancashire 11
1955–57 Great Britain 123009
Source: [1]

John "Johnny"/"Jack" James Grundy (27 August 1926 [2] – 1978) was an English professional rugby league footballer who played as a second-row forward in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s.

Contents

He played at representative level for Great Britain and Lancashire, and at club level for United Glass Bottle ARLFC (now Eccleston Lions ARLFC (in Eccleston, St Helens) of the North West Men's League), [3] New Church Tavern ARLFC (in St Helens), St. Helens, Barrow and Roose ARLFC (in Roose, Barrow-in-Furness) during the era of contested scrums. [1]

Background

Jack Grundy was born in Prescot, Lancashire, England. He served in the Royal Navy aboard HMS Liverpool. He died aged 51–52 in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria, England.

Playing career

International honours

Grundy won caps for Great Britain while at Barrow in 1955 against New Zealand (3 matches), in 1956 against Australia (3 matches). in 1957 against France (3 matches), and in the 1957 Rugby League World Cup against France, Australia, and New Zealand (1-try). [1]

Grundy also represented Great Britain while at Barrow between 1952 and 1956 against France (1 non-Test matches). [4]

Club career

Grundy was transferred from St. Helens to Barrow for a fee of £1,000 in August 1950 [5] (based on increases in average earnings, this would be approximately £81,710 in 2013). [6]

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Grundy played left-second-row, i.e. number 11, in Barrow's 0–10 defeat by Wigan in the 1951 Challenge Cup Final during the 1950–51 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 5 May 1951, [7] played left-second-row, and was voted man of the match winning the Lance Todd Trophy in the 21–12 victory over Workington Town in the 1955 Challenge Cup Final during the 1954–55 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 30 April 1955, in front of a crowd of 66,513, and played in the 7–9 defeat by Leeds in the 1957 Challenge Cup Final during the 1956–57 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 11 May 1957, in front of a crowd of 76,318. [8]

County Cup Final appearances

Grundy played in Barrow's 12–2 victory over Oldham in the 1954 Lancashire Cup Final during the 1954–55 season at Station Road, Swinton, on Saturday 23 October 1954. [9]

Career records

Grundy is tenth in Barrow's all time try scorers list with 112-tries. [10]

Genealogical information

Jack Grundy was the son of the rugby league forward of the 1920s for Lancashire and St. Helens Recs; Harry Grundy, [8] and the brother of the rugby league footballer for St.Helens Recs and Liverpool Stanley, and the Secretary of Huyton RLFC; Kenneth Grundy.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  3. "Eccleston Lions ARLFC at pitchero.com". pitchero.com. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  4. Edgar, Harry (2007). Rugby League Journal Annual 2008 Page-110. Rugby League Journal Publishing. ISBN   0-9548355-3-0
  5. "Profile at saints.org.uk". saints.org.uk. 31 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  6. "Measuring Worth – Relative Value of UK Pounds". Measuring Worth. 31 December 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2015.
  7. "1950–1951 Challenge Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  8. 1 2 "Profile at barrowrlfc.com". barrowrlfc.com. 31 December 2013. Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  9. "Trio Inducted into Barrow RL Hall of Fame". nwemail.co.uk. 7 July 2012. Archived from the original on 25 February 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2013.
  10. "Barrows all time leading try scorers". barrowrlfc.com. 31 December 2013. Archived from the original on 16 January 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2014.