Jack Hively

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Jack Hively
JackHivelyGloriaSwanson.1941.jpg
Hively with actress Gloria Swanson on the set of the 1941 film, Father Takes a Wife
Born(1910-09-05)September 5, 1910
Denver, Colorado, United States
DiedDecember 19, 1995(1995-12-19) (aged 85)
Hollywood, California, United States
OccupationFilm director, editor
Years active1934–1991

Jack Hively (September 5, 1910 – December 19, 1995) was an American film editor and film and television director whose career lasted from the 1930s through the 1980s. His father and his brother were also film editors. He began as a film editor, before moving on to direct features. His career was interrupted by his enlistment in the U.S. Army following the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor in December 1941. After the war he returned to directing films, before moving on to directing on television.

Contents

Life and career

Hively was part of a theatrical family, his father, George Hively, was an Academy Award-nominated editor (for the 1935 film, The Informer ), and his brother, George Hively Jr., was a film and television editor. [1] His mother was Georgenia Margaret Hively (née Steele).

Hively began his career in the film industry as an editor at RKO in 1933, [2] working as an assistant editor on the Richard Dix film, No Marriage Ties . [3] By the following year he was an editor, working on such films as Success at Any Price [4] and Where Sinners Meet . [5] Other notable films which Hively edited include: Annie Oakley (1935), starring Barbara Stanwyck; [6] the 1936 comedy Smartest Girl in Town , starring Gene Raymond and Ann Sothern; [7] The Man Who Found Himself (1937), which marked the starring debut for Joan Fontaine; [8] Garson Kanin's 1938 comedy, Next Time I Marry , starring Lucille Ball, James Ellison, and Lee Bowman; [9] and the second installment of The Saint franchise, 1939's The Saint Strikes Back , which marked the first time George Sanders appeared in the role. [10] After his work on The Saint, Hively would be given the opportunity to direct his own films, beginning with 1939's They Made Her a Spy . [11]

By 1940, he was considered by some to be one of the best directors in Hollywood. [12] [13] Between 1939 and the outbreak of World War II, Hively directed 14 features. [14] Having edited the second film in The Saint franchise, Hively directed the next three as well, The Saint Takes Over and The Saint's Double Trouble in 1940, [14] and in 1941 he directed the first feature film ever to be filmed in Palm Springs, California, The Saint in Palm Springs [12] Other notable films which Hively directed during this time include: a sequel to Anne of Green Gables , Anne of Windy Poplars , starring Anne Shirley; [15] the 1941 comedy starring Gloria Swanson and Adolphe Menjou, Father Takes a Wife ; [16] and the 1942 film noir, Street of Chance , starring Burgess Meredith and Claire Trevor. [17]

In 1941, Hively began dating Dorothy Lovett. [18] The two had planned to marry on Christmas Day 1941, but Hively's enlistment in the Army Signal Corps caused those plans to be delayed. [19] [20] While training for the Army Signal Corps at Wright Field in Dayton, Ohio, Hively married actress Dorothy Lovett on March 17, 1942, St. Patrick's Day. [21] [22] [23] Hively joined the Army Signal Corps in late 1941, and remained in the service for the duration of World War II, rising to the rank of Major. [19] [24] He served under General MacArthur in the Pacific Theater, along with screenwriter Jesse Lasky Jr. [25] Prior to joining MacArthur's group in the Pacific, Hively was used to direct training films. [26] While shooting one of those training films in Alaska, How to Operate in Cold Weather, Hively suffered what some accounts called "a very bad case of frostbite." [27] [28] After his discharge, Hively returned to the film industry, this time working for Universal Pictures, mostly as a second unit director. [2]

By the end of the 1940s, Hively had left the film industry, and turned his attention to television. [14] He worked sparingly during the 1950s, [29] before becoming active once again in the 1960s and 1970s. He worked regularly on several television series, including Death Valley Days , Lassie , and The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams , as well as directing several TV movies. His final directorial credit was a television film entitled California Gold Rush. [29]

Hively died on December 19, 1995, in Hollywood, California, and was buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California. [30]

Filmography

(as per AFI's database) [14]

YearFilmPositionNotes
1933 Ace of Aces Assistant editor
1933 No Marriage Ties Assistant editor
1934 Success at Any Price Editor
1934 Man of Two Worlds Editor
1934 Where Sinners Meet Editor
1935 Annie Oakley Editor
1935 Romance in Manhattan Editor
1935 His Family Tree Editor
1935 The Arizonian Editor
1935 Strangers All Editor
1936 Muss 'Em Up Editor
1936 Smartest Girl in Town Editor
1936 Murder on a Bridle Path Editor
1936 Bunker Bean Editor
1936 Grand Jury Editor
1937 Border Café Editor
1937 There Goes the Groom Editor
1937 Wise Girl Editor
1937 The Man Who Found Himself Editor
1937 Don't Tell the Wife Editor
1937 Criminal Lawyer Editor
1937 You Can't Buy Luck Editor
1937 The Life of the Party Editor
1937 The Big Shot Editor
1938 Joy of Living Editor
1938 The Affairs of Annabel Editor
1938 Blond Cheat Editor
1938 Next Time I Marry Editor
1938 A Man to Remember Editor
1939 The Great Man Votes Editor
1939 The Saint Strikes Back Editor
1939 They Made Her a Spy Director
1939 Panama Lady Director
1939 Three Sons Director
1939 Two Thoroughbreds Director
1939 The Spellbinder Director
1940 Anne of Windy Poplars Director
1940 Laddie Director
1940 The Saint Takes Over Director
1940 The Saint's Double Trouble Director
1941 Father Takes a Wife Director
1941 The Saint in Palm Springs Director
1941 They Met in Argentina DirectorHively replaced Leslie Goodwins as director when Goodwins was hospitalized for pneumonia [31]
1942 Four Jacks and a Jill Director
1942 Street of Chance Director
1944 Attack! The Battle of New Britain Cinematographer, editor
1945 Appointment in Tokyo DirectorPreserved by the Academy Film Archive in 2013. [32]
1947 The Egg and I Second unit director
1948 Are You with It? Director
1948 You Gotta Stay Happy Second unit director
1949 Family Honeymoon Second unit director
1949 Criss Cross Second unit director
1949 Once More, My Darling Second unit director
1949 Take One False Step Second unit director, associate producer
1973Starbird and Sweet WilliamDirector, producer

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References

  1. "George B. Hively". Variety. Retrieved August 19, 2015.
  2. 1 2 Brennan, Sandra. "Jack Hively, Biography". AllMovie. Retrieved August 9, 2015.
  3. "No Marriage Ties: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved March 29, 2015.
  4. "Success at Any Price: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved March 29, 2015.
  5. "Where Sinners Meet: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved March 29, 2015.
  6. "Annie Oakley: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved March 29, 2015.
  7. "Smartest Girl in Town: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved March 29, 2015.
  8. "The Man Who Found Himself: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved March 29, 2015.
  9. "Next Time I Marry: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved March 29, 2015.
  10. "The Saint Strikes Back: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved March 29, 2015.
  11. "They Made Her a Spy: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved March 29, 2015.
  12. 1 2 Jay, Burdette (September 15, 1940). "Young Film Director Has Lonely Time". The Times (Hammond, Indiana). p. 59. Retrieved August 19, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  13. "At the Theaters". The Waxahachie Daily Light. January 11, 1943. p. 3. Retrieved August 19, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  14. 1 2 3 4 "Jack Hively, Filmography". American Film Institute. Retrieved August 19, 2015.
  15. "Anne of Windy Poplars: Summary View". American Film Institute. Retrieved March 29, 2015.
  16. "Father Takes a Wife: Summary View". American Film Institute. Retrieved March 29, 2015.
  17. "Street of Chance: Summary View". American Film Institute. Retrieved March 29, 2015.
  18. Johnson, Erskine (May 22, 1941). "Hollywood Today". Big Spring Daily Herald. p. 5. Retrieved August 19, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  19. 1 2 "Mingle Bells". St. Petersburg Times. December 15, 1941. p. 13. Retrieved August 19, 2015.
  20. Carroll, Harrison (January 1, 1942). "Behind the Scenes in Hollywood". The Neosho Daily News. p. 4. Retrieved August 19, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  21. "News At-a-Glance". The Sandusky Register. March 14, 1942. p. 3. Retrieved August 19, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  22. "Actress Will Marry Director in Army". The San Bernardino County Sun. March 15, 1942. p. 4. Retrieved August 19, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  23. "Cupid, Air Corps Wings Are Paired". The Daily Times (New Philadelphia, Ohio). March 20, 1942. p. 6. Retrieved August 19, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  24. "Appointment in Tokyo, Article". Turner Classic Movies. Retrieved August 19, 2015.
  25. Lyons, Leonard (March 10, 1945). "Broadway Gazette". Harrisburg Telegraph. p. 12. Retrieved August 19, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  26. Johnson, Erskine (August 1, 1943). "Hollywood on the Loose". Lubbock Avalanche-Journal. p. 32. Retrieved August 19, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  27. Lyons, Leonard (June 2, 1943). "Broadway Medley". The Times (San Mateo, California). p. 8. Retrieved August 19, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  28. Johnson, Erskine (July 28, 1943). "Around Hollywood: Yank Humor". Pampa Daily News. p. 4. Retrieved August 19, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  29. 1 2 "Jack Hively (1910–1995)". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved August 9, 2015.
  30. Resting Places
  31. "They Met in Argentina: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved March 29, 2015.
  32. "Preserved Projects". Academy Film Archive.