Jack Hunn

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Sir Jack Kent Hunn CMG (24 August 1906 – 14 June 1997) was a New Zealand civil servant. Hunn served as Secretary of Defence, Secretary of Maori Affairs, Secretary of Justice, and Chairman of the Fire Service Commission.

Contents

Early life

Hunn was born in Masterton, and attended Wairarapa High School, before joining the Public Trust Office as a cadet. He attended Victoria University of Wellington, where he gained an LLM. Hunn joined the PSA in 1940, and worked on the executive, and became New Zealand Public Service Association President in 1945. In 1946, Hunn stepped down to become an Inspector of the Public Service Commission, working within Government to resolve public sector industrial issues. He became a commissioner in 1954, and expanded his knowledge across a broad range of the public service. While a commissioner, Hunn acted as secretary of Internal Affairs, Secretary of Justice, and Secretary of Maori Affairs. [1]

Victoria University of Wellington public university in New Zealand

Victoria University of Wellington is a university in Wellington, New Zealand. It was established in 1897 by Act of Parliament, and was a constituent college of the University of New Zealand.

Hunn Report

In 1960, Prime Minister Walter Nash engaged Hunn to do a review of the Maori Affairs Department. Hunn included in his review a wide-ranging summary of Maori assets, and the state of Maori in New Zealand at the time. Maori were going through a process of urbanisation, and Hunn's report raised the issue of integration of Maori within broader New Zealand, as opposed to segregation or assimilation. The Hunn report served as the blueprint for the establishment of the Maori Education Foundation, and the New Zealand Maori Council, and became the basis for Maori policy throughout the 1960s.

Walter Nash New Zealand politician

Sir Walter Nash was a New Zealand politician who served as the 27th Prime Minister of New Zealand in the Second Labour Government from 1957 to 1960. He is noted for his long period of political service, having been associated with the New Zealand Labour Party since its creation.

Secretary of Defence

Hunn was appointed to the new role of Secretary of Defence in 1963. This involved the establishment of a civilian department to be charged with defence policy, separate from the military Chiefs of Defence Staff. He advocated a full integration of the New Zealand Defence services, but was opposed by the individual military forces.

During 1964 Hunn was a strong opponent of New Zealand involvement in Vietnam. Initially, New Zealand Ambassador to Washington George Laking was a strong advocate for intervention, with internal opposition from Secretary of Foreign Affairs Alister McIntosh. Hunn was the clearest opponent: while Defence Chiefs were in favour of New Zealand involvement, Hunn argued that New Zealand's interests remained with supporting Malaysia, but that South Vietnam was not a sovereign state, and did not need military support. When New Zealand sent combat forces to Vietnam in 1965, Hunn retired early from Defence.

Vietnam Country in Southeast Asia

Vietnam, officially the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, is the easternmost country on the Indochina Peninsula. With an estimated 94.6 million inhabitants as of 2016, it is the 15th most populous country in the world. Vietnam is bordered by China to the north, Laos and Cambodia to the west, part of Thailand to the southwest, and the Philippines, Malaysia, and Indonesia across the South China Sea to the east and southeast. Its capital city has been Hanoi since the reunification of North and South Vietnam in 1976, while its most populous city is Ho Chi Minh City.

Sir George Robert Laking was a New Zealand diplomat who served as High Commissioner to the United Kingdom, Ambassador to the United States, Secretary of Foreign Affairs and Chief Ombudsman.

Sir Alister Donald Miles McIntosh was a New Zealand diplomat. McIntosh was New Zealand's first secretary of foreign affairs serving as the principal foreign policy adviser to Prime Ministers Peter Fraser, Sidney Holland, Keith Holyoake, and Walter Nash. He is widely considered to be the father of New Zealand's independent foreign policy and architect of the ministry of Foreign Affairs in New Zealand.

Retirement

Hunn served as Chairman of the Fire Service Commission from 1973-1977, and under the mandate of Internal Affairs Minister Allan Highet, he established a national professional fire service from a large number of small, provincial brigades. He also wrote his memoir, "Not Only Affairs of State".

Allan Highet New Zealand politician

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Personal life

Hunn's two sons have been prominent in public life: his elder son, Don Hunn, was a senior diplomat and served as State Services Commissioner, and his younger son, John, was Chief Executive and Chairman of the Todd Corporation.

Donald Kent (Don) Hunn is a senior New Zealand diplomat and civil servant. Hunn is the son of Sir Jack Hunn, a former Secretary of Defence, Maori Affairs, and Justice.

The Todd Corporation Ltd is a New Zealand company owned and controlled by the Todd family and based in Wellington. Forbes magazine estimated it to be worth at least $1 billion in 2001. Sir John Todd was chairman from 1987 until he retired in 2011. He succeeded his uncle Sir Bryan Todd when Sir Bryan died.

Honours

Hunn was appointed a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George in the 1964 Queen's Birthday Honours. [2] In the 1976 New Year Honours he was made a Knight Bachelor for public services, especially as chair of the Fire Services Commission. [3]

Further reading

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The New Year Honours 1964 were appointments in many of the Commonwealth realms of Queen Elizabeth II to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of those countries. They were announced on 1 January 1964 to celebrate the year passed and mark the beginning of 1964.

The New Year Honours 1965 were appointments in many of the Commonwealth realms of Queen Elizabeth II to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of those countries. They were announced in supplements to the London Gazette of 29 December 1964 to celebrate the year passed and mark the beginning of 1965.

The New Year Honours 1975 were appointments in many of the Commonwealth realms of Queen Elizabeth II to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of those countries. They were announced on 1 January 1975 to celebrate the year passed and mark the beginning of 1975. New Zealand, Mauritius, Fiji, and Grenada.

The Queen's Birthday Honours 1965 were appointments in many of the Commonwealth realms of Queen Elizabeth II to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of those countries. The appointments were made to celebrate the official birthday of The Queen. The announcement date varies from year to year. The 1965 Queen's Birthday Honours were announced on 12 June for the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Sierra Leone, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, Malawi, and the Gambia.

The Queen's Birthday Honours 1975 were appointments in many of the Commonwealth realms of Queen Elizabeth II to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of those countries. They were published on 6 June 1975 for the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Mauritius, Fiji, the Bahamas, and Grenada. These were the last Birthday Honours on the advice of Australian Ministers for Papua New Guinea, as the nation gained independence from Australia on 16 September 1975.

The 1947 King's Birthday Honours in New Zealand, celebrating the official birthday of King George VI, were appointments made by the King on the advice of the New Zealand government to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by New Zealanders. They were announced on 12 June 1947.

The 1950 New Year Honours in New Zealand were appointments by King George VI on the advice of the New Zealand government to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by New Zealanders. The awards celebrated the passing of 1949 and the beginning of 1950, and were announced on 2 January 1950.

The 1956 New Year Honours in New Zealand were appointments by Elizabeth II on the advice of the New Zealand government to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by New Zealanders. The awards celebrated the passing of 1955 and the beginning of 1956, and were announced on 2 January 1956.

The 1957 New Year Honours in New Zealand were appointments by Elizabeth II on the advice of the New Zealand government to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by New Zealanders. The awards celebrated the passing of 1956 and the beginning of 1957, and were announced on 1 January 1957.

The 1952 Queen's Birthday Honours in New Zealand, celebrating the official birthday of Elizabeth II, were appointments made by the Queen on the advice of the New Zealand government to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by New Zealanders. They were the first birthday honours of the new queen's reign, and were announced on 5 June 1952.

References

  1. Williams, R. M. "Jack Kent Hunn". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 23 April 2017.
  2. "No. 43345". The London Gazette (Supplement). 5 June 1964. p. 4977.
  3. "No. 46778". The London Gazette (Supplement). 5 June 1964. p. 35.