Jack Lang (Australian politician)

Last updated

Jack Lang
Jack Lang 1928 (cropped).jpg
23rd Premier of New South Wales
Elections: 1925, 1930
In office
4 November 1930 13 May 1932
  1. 1 2 Nairn 1986 , p. 30
  2. 1 2 Nairn 1986 , p. 31
  3. Nairn 1986 , p. 32
  4. 1 2 3 Nairn, Bede (1983). "Lang, John Thomas (Jack) (1876–1975)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. Retrieved 14 April 2018.
  5. "PROCLAMATION". Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales. No. 184. New South Wales, Australia. 27 June 1906. p. 3727. Retrieved 15 November 2017 via Trove.
  6. "The New Area at Auburn". The Cumberland Argus And Fruitgrowers Advocate. Vol. XVIII, no. 1318. New South Wales, Australia. 7 July 1906. p. 2. Retrieved 15 November 2017 via Trove.
  7. "Auburn". The Cumberland Argus And Fruitgrowers Advocate. Vol. XIX, no. 1396. New South Wales, Australia. 13 April 1907. p. 2. Retrieved 15 November 2017 via Trove.
  8. "Municipal Election". The Cumberland Argus And Fruitgrowers Advocate. Vol. XIX, no. 1398. New South Wales, Australia. 20 April 1907. p. 2. Retrieved 15 November 2017 via Trove.
  9. "Auburn Council". The Cumberland Argus And Fruitgrowers Advocate. Vol. XXI, no. 1587. New South Wales, Australia. 20 February 1909. p. 6. Retrieved 15 November 2017 via Trove.
  10. "AUBURN'S MAYOR". The Star. No. 271. New South Wales, Australia. 22 January 1910. p. 14. Retrieved 15 November 2017 via Trove.
  11. "Auburn Council". The Cumberland Argus And Fruitgrowers Advocate. Vol. XXII, no. 1687. New South Wales, Australia. 12 February 1910. p. 4. Retrieved 15 November 2017 via Trove.
  12. "The Hon. John Thomas Lang (1876-1975)". Former Members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 30 April 2019.
  13. Scott Stephenson. ""Ballot-Faking Crooks and a Tyrannical Executive": The Australian Workers Union Faction and the 1923 New South Wales Labor Party Annual Conference." Labour History, no. 105 (2013): 93-111. doi:10.5263/labourhistory.105.0093.
  14. "AUBURN NEWS". The Cumberland Argus And Fruitgrowers Advocate. Vol. XXXVIII, no. 3296. New South Wales, Australia. 12 November 1926. p. 3. Retrieved 14 April 2018 via Trove.
  15. Letter by Sir P Game to Mrs Eleanor Hughes-Gibb, 2.7.1932, ML MSS 2166/5.
  16. Foott, Bethia (1968). Dismissal of a Premier: the Philip Game Papers. Sydney: Morgan Publications. p. 190.
  17. "Death Notice: John Thomas Lang". The Sydney Morning Herald. 29 September 1975.

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References

  • Nairn, Bede (1986). The 'Big Fella': Jack Lang and the Australian Labor Party 1891-1949 (paperbook). Melbourne: Melbourne University Press. p. 369. ISBN   0-522-84406-5.

 

Civic offices
Preceded by
Dr. Francis Henry Furnival
Mayor of Auburn
1909–1911
Succeeded by
John Hunter
New South Wales Legislative Assembly
Preceded by Member for Granville
1913–1920
District abolished
Preceded by Member for Parramatta
1920–1927
Served alongside: Bruntnell, Ely/Morrow/Ely
Succeeded by
New district Member for Auburn
1927–1946
Succeeded by
Political offices
Preceded by Colonial Treasurer
1920–1921
Succeeded by
Preceded by Colonial Treasurer
1921–1922
Preceded by Leader of the Opposition of New South Wales
1923–1925
Succeeded by
Preceded by Premier of New South Wales
1925–1927
Succeeded by
Colonial Treasurer
1925–1927
Preceded by Secretary for Lands
1926–1927
Succeeded by
Minister for Forests
1926–1927
Preceded by Leader of the Opposition of New South Wales
1927–1930
Succeeded by
Preceded by Premier of New South Wales
1930–1932
Succeeded by
Preceded by Colonial Treasurer
1930–1932
Preceded by Leader of the Opposition of New South Wales
1932–1939
Succeeded by
Party political offices
Preceded by Leader of the Australian Labor Party (NSW Branch)
1923–1939
Succeeded by
Parliament of Australia
Preceded by Member for Reid
1946–1949
Succeeded by