Jack Leswick

Last updated
Jack Leswick
Born(1910-01-01)January 1, 1910
Humboldt, Saskatchewan, Canada
Died August 4, 1934(1934-08-04) (aged 24)
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Height 5 ft 6 in (168 cm)
Weight 155 lb (70 kg; 11 st 1 lb)
Position Centre
Shot Right
Played for Chicago Black Hawks
Playing career 19291934

Jack Leswick (January 1, 1910 – August 4, 1934) was a Canadian ice hockey centre for the Chicago Black Hawks. His only NHL season came in 1934.

Contents

Playing career

Jack Leswick played 3½ seasons for the Duluth Hornets of the AHA. He spent the second half of 1932–33 playing for the Wichita Blue Jays. He began the 1934 season in the AHA playing for the Kansas City Greyhounds. Leswick was called up to the Chicago Black Hawks shortly after the beginning of the 1934 season. He played 37 games, scoring 1 goal and 7 assists and was assessed 16 penalty minutes (PIM), as Chicago won the Stanley Cup championship that spring. Leswick wore uniform #9 with the Chicago Black Hawks.

Suspicious death

Leswick died in the off-season after the 1933-34 season. His body was found in the Assiniboine River without his wallet or other valuables. Leswick's death was ruled either a suicide or accident by the Winnipeg Coroner. [1]

Awards and achievements

Personal life

Two of Leswick's brothers, Pete and Tony, played in the NHL. Pete played briefly with the New York Rangers and Boston Bruins and Tony spent 12 seasons in the NHL with the New York Rangers, Chicago Black Hawks, and Detroit Red Wings. Tony won 3 Stanley Cups with Detroit in 1952, 1954, and 1955. Leswick's nephew is former Major League Baseball player Lenny Dykstra. [2]

See also

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References

  1. "Jack Leswick: Profile page". LostHockey.com. Archived from the original on 2008-06-02. Retrieved 2008-12-01.
  2. Frankie, Christopher (2013). Nailed!: The Improbable Rise and Spectacular Fall of Lenny Dykstra. Running Press. ISBN   9780762448289 . Retrieved 11 October 2017.