Jack Marshall

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  1. 1 2 New Zealand Army Orders 1952/405
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Gustafson, Barry. "Marshall, John Ross". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 27 August 2013.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Gentleman Jack held in respect". Auckland Star . 4 September 1988. p. A8.
  4. 1 2 3 "NZ behind UN resolution to abolish death penalty". beehive.govt.nz. New Zealand Government. 11 October 2007. Retrieved 22 January 2019.
  5. Gustafson 1986, pp. 81–2.
  6. Chapman, R M; Jackson, W K; Mitchell, A V (1962). New Zealand Politics in Action: the 1960 General Election . London: Oxford University Press.
  7. "Capital punishment in New Zealand – The death penalty". NZ History. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. 5 August 2014. Retrieved 22 January 2019.
  8. 1 2 3 McLean, Gavin (8 November 2017). "John Marshall". NZ History. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 22 January 2019.
  9. Wilson 1985, p. 283.
  10. Marshall 1989, p. 184.
  11. "National lists "alternative Government"". Auckland Star . 11 July 1974. p. 1.
  12. Wilson 1985, p. 218.
  13. Roberts, Neil (1994). Robert Muldoon: The Grim Face of Power. TV3.
  14. "Sir John's Tales Sell Out". The New Zealand Herald . 7 December 1978. p. 1.
  15. "NZ Federation". NZ Federation. Archived from the original on 29 August 2012. Retrieved 1 December 2012.
  16. "About New Zealand Portrait Gallery". New Zealand Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 22 January 2019.
  17. Taylor, Alister; Coddington, Deborah (1994). Honoured by the Queen – New Zealand. Auckland: New Zealand Who's Who Aotearoa. p. 345. ISBN   0-908578-34-2.
  18. "No. 45861". The London Gazette (2nd supplement). 29 December 1972. p. 33.
  19. "No. 46360". The London Gazette (2nd supplement). 4 October 1974. p. 8345.
  20. "No. 52953". The London Gazette (2nd supplement). 13 June 1992. p. 30.

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References

Sir John Marshall
Jack Marshall, 1972.jpg
Marshall in 1972
28th Prime Minister of New Zealand
In office
7 February 1972 8 December 1972
Government offices
Preceded by Deputy Prime Minister of New Zealand
1957

1960–1972
Succeeded by
Preceded bySucceeded by
Preceded by Prime Minister of New Zealand
1972
Succeeded by
Political offices
Preceded by Minister of Statistics
1949–1951
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister of Health
1951–1954
Succeeded by
Preceded by Attorney-General
1953–1957

1969–1971
Succeeded by
Preceded bySucceeded by
Preceded by Minister of Justice
1954–1957
Succeeded by
New title Minister of Overseas Trade
1960–1972
Succeeded by
New Zealand Parliament
New constituency Member of Parliament for Mount Victoria
1946–1954
Constituency abolished
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Karori
1954–1975
Succeeded by