Jack McBride

Last updated
Jack McBride
Born:(1901-11-30)November 30, 1901
Conshohocken, Pennsylvania, United States
Career information
Position(s) Running back
Quarterback
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 185 lb (84 kg)
College Syracuse
Career history
As coach
1935 Patterson Panthers
1936–1937 New York Yankees
1940 New York Yankees
As player
1925–1928 New York Giants
1929 Providence Steam Roller
1930–1932 Brooklyn Dodgers
1932–1934 New York Giants
1935 Patterson Panthers
Career highlights and awards
Career stats

John F. McBride (born November 30, 1901, date of death unknown) was an American football player who played the positions of halfback, fullback, and quarterback in the National Football League (NFL). He was born in Conshohocken, Pennsylvania. McBride played collegiately at Syracuse University where he finished second in the nation in scoring in his senior year to Heinie Benkert. [1] McBride scored 90 points on 7 touchdowns, 11 field goals, and 15 extra points [1] in his senior year.

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

Halfback (American football) offensive position in American football

A halfback (HB) is an offensive position in American football, whose duties involve lining up in the backfield and carrying the ball on most rushing plays, i.e. a running back. When the principal ball carrier lines up deep in the backfield, and especially when that player is placed behind another player, as in the I formation, that player is instead referred to as a tailback.

Quarterback position in gridiron football

A quarterback, colloquially known as the "signal caller", is a position in American and Canadian football. Quarterbacks are members of the offensive team and line up directly behind the offensive line. In modern American football, the quarterback is usually considered the leader of the offensive team, and is often responsible for calling the play in the huddle. The quarterback also touches the ball on almost every offensive play, and is the offensive player that almost always throws forward passes.

Contents

McBride played 10 seasons in the NFL, leading the Giants in scoring in each of their first three seasons (1925–27), [2] and the NFL in scoring in 1927. [3] As a passer, McBride ended his career with 3,123 yards passing, 31 touchdown passes, and 57 interceptions. [4] As a rusher McBride totalled 2,093 yards rushing, and 26 rushing touchdowns, while averaging 4.2 yards a carry. [4]

McBride maintained his connection with pro football after his career in the NFL serving as the player/coach of the Paterson Panthers (later of the American Association) in 1935 [5] and as coach of the New York Yankees of the second American Football League and the New York Yankees of the third AFL in 1940-1941. [6]

The New York Yankees of the second American Football League was the second professional American football team competing under that name. It is unrelated to the Yankees of the first AFL, the Yankees of the third AFL, the Yankees of the American Association and the (later) Yankees of the All-America Football Conference. The Yankees played their home games in Yankee Stadium and Triborough Stadium in New York, New York. Jack McBride was the team’s head coach throughout its existence; Yankees' president James Bush served as president of the second American Football League in 1936.

The American Football League (AFL) was a professional American football league that operated in 1936 and 1937. The AFL operated in direct competition with the more established National Football League (NFL) throughout its existence. While the American media generally ignored its operation, this second AFL was the first "home" of the Cleveland Rams, which joined the National Football League after one year in the AFL.

The New York Yankees of the third American Football League was the third professional American football team competing under that name. It is unrelated to the Yankees of the first AFL, the Yankees of the second AFL, and the (later) Yankees of the All-America Football Conference. The Yankees played their home games in Yankee Stadium and Downing Stadium in New York, New York.

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References

  1. 1 2 Benkert Captures 1924 Scoring Title, The New York Times , October 1, 1924, accessed March 29, 2007.
  2. Giants Offensive Statistics Archived 2007-09-29 at the Wayback Machine . (PDF), giants.com/history, accessed May 12, 2007.
  3. Neft, David S., Cohen, Richard M., and Korch, Rick. The Complete History of Professional Football from 1892 to the Present. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1994 pg. 68 ISBN   0-312-11435-4
  4. 1 2 Jack McBride, jt-sw.com, accessed March 21, 2007.
  5. New York Giants football records, 1935
  6. New York Yankees (AFL III) football records