Jack Pimm

Last updated

Jack Pimm
Personal information
Full name John Huggett Pimm
Date of birth(1920-10-07)7 October 1920
Place of birth Avoca, Victoria
Date of death 26 February 2016(2016-02-26) (aged 95)
Place of death East Ivanhoe, Victoria
Original team(s) Wattle Glen [1]
Height 183 cm (6 ft 0 in)
Weight 82 kg (181 lb)
Position(s) Centre half-forward
Playing career1
YearsClubGames (Goals)
1940–1950 Collingwood 58 (113)
1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 1950.
Career highlights

Top goalkicker Collingwood 1949

Sources: AFL Tables, AustralianFootball.com
John Huggett Pimm
4115253 C55221 vfl afl players 15th Brigade.jpg
Victorian Football League and Victorian Football Association players who were members of 15th Australian Infantry Brigade, 1 January 1944, at the 15th Brigade Gymkhana, Koitaki-Donadabu area, Papua New Guinea. Identified left to right (crouching) are: VX139608 LCpl James Patrick "Shane" McGrath (VFL Melbourne) (1); VX144709 Lt John Huggett "Jack" Pimm (VFL Collingwood) (2); VX82114 WO1 Kenneth Onley (VFA Port Melbourne) (3); VX82103 LCpl Richard David Hingston (VFL Melbourne) (4); VX137507 Cpl Ronald Walter Leishman (VFA Brunswick) (5); VX31950 Lt Douglas Maldon White (Amenities Officer, 15th Brigade) (6).
Nickname(s)"Jack"
Allegiance Australia
Service/branch Australian Army
Years of service1943-1946
Rank Lieutenant
Unit 58th/59th Infantry Battalion
Battles/wars Second World War
Awards Military Cross

John Huggett "Jack" Pimm, MC (7 October 1920 26 February 2016) was an Australian rules footballer who played with Collingwood in the Victorian Football League (VFL). [2]

Pimm grew up in what was then a Collingwood recruitment zone, around Wattle Glen, Victoria. He attended Melbourne High School and watched Collingwood training sessions from an early age. [3]

Pimm, a centre half-forward, played five senior games as well as games in the seconds for Collingwood in the 1940 VFL season but did not play again until 1946, the lengthy interruption being due to his World War II military service. [3]

Pimm saw active military service in the Australian Army achieving the rank of Lieutenant, [4] serving mostly with the 15th Australian Infantry Brigade, primarily as a member of the 58th/59th Battalion [5] [6] [7] [8] and also with the 57th/60th Battalion. [9] He saw fighting first in Papua New Guinea. Later, on Bougainville Island he was awarded the Military Cross "for inspired and gallant service". [4] [10] At wars end he was transferred to the 11th Brigade for a time, prior to repatriation from the South West Pacific and discharge from the Army. [4]

Pimm resumed his VFL senior playing career with Collingwood on 10 June 1946, two weeks after he was discharged from the Army, [4] and a day on which Collingwood won. [11] He played fourteen games that year, including a semi final and preliminary final. Over his VFL playing career for Collingwood (1940, 1946-1950) he went on to play a total of fifty eight senior games of which thirty four were wins. [3] [12] Pimm kicked a total of 113 goals. [12] In 1949 he kicked thirty four goals, which was enough to top Collingwood's goal-kicking for that season. [12] [13] Of the twenty nine games he played at Victoria Park, Collingwood's home ground from 1892 until 1999, twenty four were won by Collingwood. [12] Pimm was made a Life Member at Collingwood in 1953. [10]

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References

  1. Holmesby, Russell; Main, Jim (2007). The Encyclopedia of AFL Footballers. BAS Publishing. ISBN   978-1-920910-78-5.
  2. "Jack Huggett Pimm" (PDF). ST. GEORGE’S ANGLICAN CHURCH. Retrieved 8 April 2017.
  3. 1 2 3 "Forever Collingwood FC - Jack Pimm Biography" . Retrieved 3 March 2019.
  4. 1 2 3 4 "WW2 Nominal Roll VX144709 Pimm". Government of Australia . Retrieved 3 March 2019.
  5. "Group portrait of officers (without hats) of 58/59 Infantry Battalion with Brigadier (Brig) H H Hammer CBE DSO, Commander 15 Infantry Brigade. Torokina, Central Bougainville, 28 September 1945" . Retrieved 3 March 2019.
  6. "Port Moresby, Papua, New Guinea. 1944-01-05. Troops of the 58/59th Australian Infantry Battalion, 15th Australian Infantry Brigade, embussed and ready to move off for the airstrip when transferring to Dumpu, New Guinea" . Retrieved 3 March 2019.
  7. "Port Moresby, Papua, New Guinea. 1944-01-05. Troops of the 58/59th Australian Infantry Battalion, 15th Australian Infantry Brigade, with their stores, ready to embuss for their trip to the airstrip for their move to Dumpu, New Guinea" . Retrieved 3 March 2019.
  8. "Ex-Victorian League and Association footballers in attendance at the 15th Infantry Brigade Gymkhana, Donadabu, Papua New Guinea. 1944-01-01" . Retrieved 3 March 2019.
  9. Corfield, Robin (1991). Hold Hard, Cobbers: The Story of the 57th and 60th and 57/60th Australian Army Infantry Battalions, 1912–1990. Volume II (1930–1990). Page 348. Glenhuntly, Victoria: 57/60th Battalion (AIF) Association. ISBN   0-646-04099-5.
  10. 1 2 "Vale Jack Pimm: A tribute to Jack Pimm. Collingwood Football Club" . Retrieved 3 March 2019.
  11. "Collingwood d. Carlton 10 June 1946" . Retrieved 3 March 2019.
  12. 1 2 3 4 "AFL Tables: Jack Pimm". afltables.com. Retrieved 3 March 2019.
  13. "Jack Pimm - Player Bio". Australian Football. Retrieved 14 August 2015.