Jack Townley

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Jack Townley
Born(1897-03-03)March 3, 1897
DiedOctober 15, 1960(1960-10-15) (aged 63)
OccupationScreenwriter
Years active1926–1957

Jack Townley (March 3, 1897 October 15, 1960) was an American screenwriter. He wrote for nearly 100 films between 1926 and 1957. He was born in Kansas City, Missouri, and died in Los Angeles, California.

Selected filmography

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