Jack Wilkinson (rugby league)

Last updated

Jack Wilkinson
Personal information
Born(1930-08-16)16 August 1930
Halifax, England
Died1992 (aged 6162)
Halifax, England
Playing information
Height5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight15 st 7 lb (98 kg)
Position Prop
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1948–59 Halifax 252220066
1959–63 Wakefield Trinity 151100030
1963 Bradford Northern 120000
Total415320096
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
195?–6? Yorkshire 10
1956–58 English League XIII 213
1953–55 England 20000
1954–62 Great Britain 1340012
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
1963 Bradford Northern
Source: [1] [2] [3] [4]

Jack Wilkinson (16 August 1930 [5] – 1992) was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, and coached in the 1960s. A Halifax (Heritage № 612) and Wakefield Trinity Hall of Fame inductee, [6] he was a Great Britain and England international forward. [1] [2] [3] Wilkinson also represented Yorkshire, and ended his career as captain-coach of Bradford Northern. [4]

Contents

Background

Jack Wilkinson as born in Halifax, West Riding of Yorkshire, England, he was a classmate of wrestler Shirley "Big Daddy" Crabtree, and he died age 61 in Halifax, West Yorkshire, England.

Playing career

Halifax

Jack Wilkinson won caps for Great Britain while at Halifax between 1952 and 1956 against France (1 non-Test match). [7] Wilkinson also represented England while at Halifax in 1953 against Other Nationalities. Wilkinson played at prop in Halifax's 4–4 draw with Warrington in the 1953–54 Challenge Cup Final during the 1953–54 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 24 April 1954, in front of a crowd of 81,841. In the subsequent replay he played right-prop, i.e. number 10, in the 4–8 loss to Warrington which attracted a record crowd of 102,575, or more, to Odsal Stadium, Bradford on Wednesday 5 May 1954. [8]

Wilkinson won caps for Great Britain while at Halifax in 1954 against Australia and New Zealand (2 matches). He also played for English League XIII while at Halifax against France. Wilkinson played for England in 1955 against Other Nationalities. He won caps for Great Britain in 1955 against New Zealand (3 matches). Auckland defeated Great Britain 5-4 at Carlaw Park in a rough match which resulted in Wilkinson and Nat Silcock being sent off. Wilkinson played in the 2–13 defeat by St. Helens in the 1955–56 Challenge Cup Final during the 1955–56 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 28 April 1956. Wilkinson was selected for Yorkshire County XIII while at Halifax in 1959. [9] Wilkinson's Testimonial match at Halifax took place in 1958.

Wakefield Trinity

Jack Wilkinson joined Wakefield Trinity from Halifax in 1959 for £4,500 [10] (based on increases in average earnings, this would be approximately £207,900 in 2013). [11] During the 1959–60 Kangaroo tour Wilkinson was selected to play for Great Britain at prop in their victory in the third and deciding Ashes test. During the 1959–60 season Wilkinson played left-prop, i.e. number 8, in Wakefield Trinity's 38–5 victory over Hull F.C. in the 1959–60 Challenge Cup Final during the 1959–60 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 14 May 1960, in front of a crowd of 79,773. He then played in the 3–27 loss against Wigan in the Rugby Football League Championship Final at Odsal Stadium, Bradford on Saturday, 21 May 1960. [12]

Wilkinson was selected for Yorkshire County XIII while at Wakefield Trinity. [9]

Wilkinson helped Great Britain to victory in the 1960 World Cup, playing in all three games, and scoring a try in the 33–7 victory over France on Saturday 1 October 1960 at Station Road, Swinton. During the 1960–61 season Wilkinson played for Wakefield Trinity at prop in their victory over Huddersfield in the 1960–61 Yorkshire Cup Final at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 29 October 1960, [13] The following year he again played at prop in Wakefield's victory in the 1961 Yorkshire Cup Final, this time over Leeds. Wilkinson played left-prop in the 12–6 victory over Huddersfield in the 1961–62 Challenge Cup Final during the 1961–62 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 12 May 1962, in front of a crowd of 81,263, and played left-prop in the 25–10 victory over Wigan in the 1962–63 Challenge Cup Final during the 1962–63 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 11 May 1963, in front of a crowd of 84,492. [13]

Bradford Northern

Jack Wilkinson moved to Bradford Northern, as captain-coach in 1963. That year the film This Sporting Life which starred Richard Harris was released and in it Wilkinson is clearly visible as a rugby player in several scenes.

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Harry Beverley
1962-1963
Coach
Bullscolours.svg
Bradford Northern

1963
Succeeded by
Gus Risman
1964-1971

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References

  1. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. 1 2 "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 2 April 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. 1 2 "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 21 April 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  4. 1 2 "Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  5. "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2016. Retrieved 1 January 2017.
  6. "Halifax RLFC Hall of Fame". halifaxrlfc.co.uk. 31 December 2011. Archived from the original on 10 September 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  7. Edgar, Harry (2007). Rugby League Journal Annual 2008 Page-110. Rugby League Journal Publishing. ISBN   0-9548355-3-0
  8. "Mud, blood and memories of the day when 102,575 made history at Odsal". independent.co.uk. 31 December 2016. Retrieved 1 January 2017.
  9. 1 2 Lindley, John (1960). Dreadnoughts – A HISTORY OF Wakefield Trinity F. C. 1873 – 1960 [Page118]. John Lindley Son & Co Ltd. ISBN n/a
  10. Briggs, Cyril & Edwards, Barry (12 May 1962). The Rugby League Challenge Cup Competition – Final Tie – Huddersfield v Wakefield Trinity – Match Programme. Wembley Stadium Ltd. ISBN n/a
  11. "Measuring Worth – Relative Value of UK Pounds". Measuring Worth. 31 December 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2015.
  12. "1959–1960 Championship Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  13. 1 2 Hoole, Les (2004). Wakefield Trinity RLFC – FIFTY GREAT GAMES. Breedon Books. ISBN   1-85983-429-9