James, Duke of Rothesay (born 1540)

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James Stewart
Duke of Rothesay
Born22 May 1540
St Andrews, Fife
Died(1541-04-21)21 April 1541
(aged 334 days)
St Andrews, Fife
House Stuart
Father James V
Mother Mary of Guise

James Stewart, Duke of Rothesay (22 May 1540 – 21 April 1541) was a short-lived heir to the throne of the Kingdom of Scotland. He was the eldest son of James V and Mary of Guise, and nephew of his namesake James, Duke of Rothesay.

Kingdom of Scotland historic sovereign kingdom on the British Isles from the 9th century and up to 1707

The Kingdom of Scotland was a sovereign state in northwest Europe traditionally said to have been founded in 843. Its territories expanded and shrank, but it came to occupy the northern third of the island of Great Britain, sharing a land border to the south with the Kingdom of England. It suffered many invasions by the English, but under Robert I it fought a successful War of Independence and remained an independent state throughout the late Middle Ages. In 1603, James VI of Scotland became King of England, joining Scotland with England in a personal union. In 1707, the two kingdoms were united to form the Kingdom of Great Britain under the terms of the Acts of Union. Following the annexation of the Northern Isles from the Kingdom of Norway in 1472 and final capture of the Royal Burgh of Berwick by the Kingdom of England in 1482, the territory of the Kingdom of Scotland corresponded to that of modern-day Scotland, bounded by the North Sea to the east, the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, and the North Channel and Irish Sea to the southwest.

James V of Scotland King of Scots

James V was King of Scotland from 9 September 1513 until his death, which followed the Scottish defeat at the Battle of Solway Moss. His only surviving legitimate child, Mary, Queen of Scots, succeeded him when she was just six days old.

Mary of Guise 16th-century French noblewoman and queen of Scotland

Mary of Guise, also called Mary of Lorraine, ruled Scotland as regent from 1554 until her death. A noblewoman from the Lotharingian House of Guise, which played a prominent role in 16th-century French politics, Mary became queen consort upon her marriage to King James V of Scotland in 1538. Her infant daughter, Mary, ascended the throne when James died in 1542. Mary of Guise's main goal as regent was a close alliance between the powerful French Catholic nation and smaller Scotland, which she wanted to be Catholic and independent of England. She failed, and at her death the Protestants took control of Scotland, with her own grandson achieving the Union of the Crowns a few decades later.

At the time of his birth in St Andrews, James V had survived his own brothers. The newborn Duke of Rothesay and his father were the only living legitimate descendants of his paternal grandfather James IV of Scotland. The heir presumptive since 1536 was his second cousin James Hamilton, 2nd Earl of Arran.

St Andrews Town in Fife, Scotland

St Andrews is a town on the east coast of Fife in Scotland, 10 miles (16 km) southeast of Dundee and 30 miles (50 km) northeast of Edinburgh. St Andrews has a recorded population of 16,800 in 2011, making it Fife's fourth largest settlement and 45th most populous settlement in Scotland.

James IV of Scotland King of Scots

James IV was the King of Scotland from 11 June 1488 to his death. He assumed the throne following the death of his father, King James III, at the Battle of Sauchieburn, a rebellion in which the younger James played an indirect role. He is generally regarded as the most successful of the Stewart monarchs of Scotland, but his reign ended in a disastrous defeat at the Battle of Flodden. He was the last monarch from the island of Great Britain to be killed in battle.

The young Duke died only a year after his birth, at St Andrews. His younger brother, Arthur Stewart, Duke of Albany, was born in April 1541 but neither sibling survived that month. Their deaths left James V with no legitimate child and the Earl of Arran again heir to the throne. Their younger sister Mary was born the following year and, only a few days later, succeeded their father as queen regnant with the Earl of Arran as regent.

Mary, Queen of Scots 16th-century Scottish ruler and queen consort of France

Mary, Queen of Scots, also known as Mary Stuart or Mary I of Scotland, reigned over Scotland from 14 December 1542 to 24 July 1567.

A queen regnant is a female monarch, equivalent in rank to a king, who reigns in her own right, as opposed to a queen consort, who is the wife of a reigning king, or a queen regent, who is the guardian of a child monarch and reigns temporarily in the child's stead. An empress regnant is a female monarch who reigns in her own right over an empire.

A regent is a person appointed to govern a state because the monarch is a minor, is absent or is incapacitated. The rule of a regent or regents is called a regency. A regent or regency council may be formed ad hoc or in accordance with a constitutional rule. "Regent" is sometimes a formal title. If the regent is holding his position due to his position in the line of succession, the compound term prince regent is often used; if the regent of a minor is his mother, she is often referred to as "queen regent".

Sources

Alison Weir is a British writer of history books, and latterly historical novels, mostly in the form of biographies about British royalty.


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James Stewart, Duke of Rothesay was a short-lived heir to the throne of the Kingdom of Scotland. He was the eldest son of James IV and his queen consort Margaret Tudor.