James Bugental

Last updated
James Frederick Thomas Bugental
JimBugental1.jpg
BornDecember 25, 1915
DiedSeptember 17, 2008
Era20th century
Region Existential-Humanistic Psychology
School Existential-Humanistic Therapy
Notable ideas
Postulates of Humanistic Psychology
Elizabeth & Jim Bugental Elizabeth&JimBugental.jpg
Elizabeth & Jim Bugental

James Frederick Thomas Bugental [1] (December 25, 1915 – September 17, 2008) was one of the predominant theorists and advocates of the Existential-Humanistic Therapy movement. He was a therapist, teacher and writer for over 50 years. He received his Ph.D. from Ohio State University, was named a Fellow of the American Psychological Association in 1955, and was the first recipient of the APA's Division of Humanistic Psychology's Rollo May Award. He held leadership positions in a number of professional organizations, including president of the California State Psychological Association.

Contents

Theory

In "The Search for Authenticity" (1965), Bugental summarized the postulates of humanistic psychology, often quoted by other theorists:

Publications

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References

  1. Stefan E. Schulenberg, Approaching Terra Incognita with James F. T. Bugental: An Interview and an Overview of Existential-Humanistic Psychotherapy. Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy (2003), 33, 4, pp. 273-285.