James Burke (actor)

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James Burke
James Burke The Du Pont Show 1960.jpg
Burke in "Once Upon a Knight", an episode of The DuPont Show with June Allyson (1960)
Born
James Michael Burke

(1886-08-28)August 28, 1886
DiedJune 23, 1968(1968-06-23) (aged 81)
OccupationActor
Years active1932–1959
Spouse(s)Eleanor Durkin
(m. 19??; div. 1957)

James Michael Burke (September 24, 1886 May 23, 1968) was an Irish-American film and television character actor born in New York City. [1]

Contents

Career

Burke (left) with Humphrey Bogart in film Dead End (1937) Humphrey Bogart Dead End Still.jpg
Burke (left) with Humphrey Bogart in film Dead End (1937)

Burke made his stage debut in New York around 1912 and went to Hollywood in 1933. He made over 200 film appearances during his career between 1932 and 1964, some of them uncredited.[ citation needed ] He was often cast as a police officer, usually a none-too-bright one, such as his role as Sergeant Velie in Columbia Pictures' Ellery Queen crime dramas in the early 1940s. Burke can also be seen in At The Circus , The Maltese Falcon , Lone Star , and many other films. One of his memorable roles is his portrayal of a rowdy rancher in the 1935 comedy Ruggles of Red Gap .[ citation needed ]

In the early 1950s, Burke appeared on television with Tom Conway in the ABC detective drama Inspector Mark Saber—Homicide Detective, a series later renamed, reformatted, and switched to NBC under the new title Saber of London .[ citation needed ] In 1955 Burke appeared as Buckshot on the TV western Cheyenne in the episode "Border Showdown." In 1958, he appeared as Sheriff John Tatum in the episode, "Bounty" in the TV series, Wanted: Dead or Alive.

Death

Burke died on May 23, 1968 in Los Angeles, California at age 81. His death was attributed to a heart condition.[ citation needed ]

Selected filmography


• Stagecoach West - TV (1960/61) - Zeke Bonner (recurring character)

References and notes

  1. "New York, New York City Births, 1846-1909", FHL microfilm 1,322,214; New York Municipal Archives, Manhattan, New York, N.Y. FamilySearch. Retrieved February 20, 2019.

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