James Dickson (New Zealand politician)

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New Zealand Parliament
YearsTermElectorateParty
1914 1919 19th Chalmers Reform
1919 1922 20th Chalmers Reform
1922 1925 21st Chalmers Reform
1925 1928 22nd Chalmers Reform

James McColl Dickson (1854 – 16 March 1937) was a Reform Party Member of Parliament in New Zealand.

Dickson was born in Victoria in 1854. He came to Otago as a nine-year-old and continued his schooling there. Together with his brother, he was for many years a sawmiller. He then had a farm at Portobello for the next 40 years breeding stock. [1]

Dickson was a member of the Portobello School Committee. In 1911, he was voted onto the Otago Harbour Board and served for three terms as chairman. He first stood for Parliament in the 1911 election in the Chalmers electorate but missed out to reach the second ballot by less than 100 votes. [1] He won the Chalmers electorate in the 1914 general election, and held it to 1928, when he retired. [2]

Dickson's wife died before him. Dickson lived at his son-in-law's place in the Dunedin suburb of Roslyn when he died on 16 March 1937. He was survived by three sons and two daughters. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Obituary : Mr J. M'C Dickson". Otago Daily Times (23141). 17 March 1937. p. 9. Retrieved 18 February 2020.
  2. Scholefield, Guy (1950) [First ed. published 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1949 (3rd ed.). Wellington: Govt. Printer. p. 103.
New Zealand Parliament
Preceded by
Edward Clark
Member of Parliament for Chalmers
1914–1928
Succeeded by
Alfred Ansell