James Ogilvie (coach)

Last updated
James Ogilvie
Biographical details
Bornc. 1866
England
DiedJuly 12, 1950
Amesbury, Massachusetts
Playing career
1891–1894 Williams
Position(s) Guard
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1899 NYU
Head coaching record
Overall2–6

James Ogilvie (c. 1866 – July 12, 1950) was a physician and surgeon as well as an American football player and coach. [1] He served the third head football coach at New York University (NYU). He held that position for the 1899 season, leading the NYU Violets to a record of 2–6. [2] One of the two wins for his team was a 6–5 victory over Rutgers [3] In at least two other games, against Hamilton and Columbia, the team produced what were considered to be poor performances. [4] [5] Ogilvie was referred to at least one time as "Dr. Ogilvie" [6] and had previously played as a guard at Williams College from 1891 to 1894, [7] [8] [9] a member of the class of 1895. [10] [11] He also attended Columbia University, where he received his M. D. [12]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
NYU Violets (Independent)(1899)
1899 NYU 2–6
NYU:2–6
Total:2–6

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References

  1. "Dr. James Ogilvie". The North Adams Transcript. July 14, 1950. p. 3. Retrieved January 4, 2016 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  2. "New York Coaching Records". Archived from the original on 2010-12-13.
  3. New York Times "New York University Wins" November 12, 1899
  4. New York Times "Hamilton College Beats New York University" November 26, 1899
  5. New York Times "Football at Columbia" October 26, 1899
  6. New York Times "Football at New York University" September 26, 1899
  7. "Officers and Graduates of Columbia University, Originally the College of the ..." 1916.
  8. New York Times "FIGHTING FOOTBALL PLAYERS.; THE WILLIAMS ELEVEN ACT BADLY IN THE GAME WITH HARVARD." October 18, 1891
  9. New York Times "A Ray of Hope for Yale" October 13, 1892
  10. "Williams College Bulletin". 1915.
  11. "Williamstown". The North Adams Transcript. September 17, 1895. p. 3. Retrieved January 4, 2016 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  12. "Williams College Catalogue, 1905". Mocavo.