James P. Hogan (writer)

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James Patrick Hogan
James P. Hogan 2005.JPG
At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005.
BornJames Patrick Hogan
(1941-06-27)27 June 1941
London, England
Died12 July 2010(2010-07-12) (aged 69)
Dromahaire, County Leitrim, Ireland

James Patrick Hogan (27 June 1941 – 12 July 2010) was a British science fiction author. [1]

Contents

Biography

Hogan was born in London, England. He was raised in the Portobello Road area on the west side of London. After leaving school at the age of sixteen, he worked various odd jobs until, after receiving a scholarship, he began a five-year program at the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Farnborough covering the practical and theoretical sides of electrical, electronic, and mechanical engineering. He first married at the age of twenty. He married three more times and fathered six children.[ citation needed ]

Portobello Road street in London

Portobello Road is a street in the Notting Hill district of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in west London. It runs almost the length of Notting Hill from south to north, roughly parallel with Ladbroke Grove. On Saturdays it is home to Portobello Road Market, one of London's notable street markets, known for its second-hand clothes and antiques. Every August since 1996, the Portobello Film Festival has been held in locations around Portobello Road.

Royal Aircraft Establishment defunct aerospace research organization and aircraft manufacturer

The Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE) was a British research establishment, known by several different names during its history, that eventually came under the aegis of the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD), before finally losing its identity in mergers with other institutions.

Hogan worked as a design engineer for several companies and eventually moved into sales in the 1960s, traveling around Europe as a sales engineer for Honeywell. In the 1970s he joined the Digital Equipment Corporation's Laboratory Data Processing Group and in 1977 moved to Boston, Massachusetts to run its sales training program. He published his first novel, Inherit the Stars , in the same year to win an office bet.[ citation needed ]

Honeywell Multinational conglomerate

Honeywell International Inc. is an American multinational conglomerate company that makes a variety of commercial and consumer products, engineering services and aerospace systems for a wide variety of customers, from private consumers to major corporations and governments. The company operates four business units, known as Strategic Business Units – Honeywell Aerospace, Home and Building Technologies (HBT), Safety and Productivity Solutions (SPS), and Honeywell Performance Materials and Technologies.

Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC), using the trademark Digital, was a major American company in the computer industry from the 1950s to the 1990s.

He quit DEC in 1979 and began writing full-time, moving to Orlando, Florida, for a year where he met his third wife Jackie. They then moved to Sonora, California.[ citation needed ] Hogan died of a heart attack at his home in Ireland on Monday, 12 July 2010, aged 69. [2]

Orlando, Florida City in Central Florida

Orlando is a city in the U.S. state of Florida and the county seat of Orange County. Located in Central Florida, it is the center of the Orlando metropolitan area, which had a population of 2,509,831, according to U.S. Census Bureau figures released in July 2017. These figures make it the 23rd-largest metropolitan area in the United States, the sixth-largest metropolitan area in the Southern United States, and the third-largest metropolitan area in Florida. As of 2015, Orlando had an estimated city-proper population of 280,257, making it the 73rd-largest city in the United States, the fourth-largest city in Florida, and the state's largest inland city.

Sonora, California City in California, United States

Sonora is the county seat of Tuolumne County, California. The city population was 4,904 during the 2010 Census, an increase of 100 from the 4,804 counted during the 2000 Census. Sonora is the only incorporated community in Tuolumne County.

Writings

Most of Hogan's fiction is hard science fiction.

Hogan's fiction also reflects anti-authoritarian social views and as such forms part of anarchist science fiction. Many of his novels have strong anarchist or libertarian themes, [3] [ citation needed ] often promoting the idea that new technological advances render certain social conventions obsolete. For example, the effectively limitless availability of energy that would result from the development of controlled nuclear fusion would make it unnecessary to limit access to energy resources. In essence, energy would become free. This melding of scientific and social speculation is clearly present in the novel Voyage from Yesteryear (strongly influenced by Eric Frank Russell's story "And Then There Were None") about a high-tech anarchist society in the Alpha Centauri system, a starship sent from Earth by a dictatorial government, and the events following their first contact. The story features concepts of civil disobedience, post scarcity and gift economy. [4] [ citation needed ]

Authoritarianism is a form of government characterized by strong central power and limited political freedoms. Individual freedoms are subordinate to the state and there is no constitutional accountability and rule of law under an authoritarian regime. Authoritarian regimes can be autocratic with power concentrated in one person or it can be more spread out between multiple officials and government institutions. Juan Linz's influential 1964 description of authoritarianism characterized authoritarian political systems by four qualities:

  1. Limited political pluralism, that is such regimes place constraints on political institutions and groups like legislatures, political parties and interest groups;
  2. A basis for legitimacy based on emotion, especially the identification of the regime as a necessary evil to combat "easily recognizable societal problems" such as enemies of the people or state, underdevelopment or insurgency;
  3. Minimal social mobilization most often caused by constraints on the public such as suppression of political opponents and anti-regime activity;
  4. Informally defined executive power with often vague and shifting, but vast powers.

Anarchism is an anti-authoritarian political philosophy that advocates self-governed societies based on voluntary, cooperative institutions and the rejection of hierarchies those societies view as unjust. These institutions are often described as stateless societies, although several authors have defined them more specifically as distinct institutions based on non-hierarchical or free associations. Anarchism holds the state to be undesirable, unnecessary and harmful.

Libertarianism is a collection of political philosophies and movements that uphold liberty as a core principle. Libertarians seek to maximize political freedom and autonomy, emphasizing freedom of choice, voluntary association and individual judgment. Libertarians share a skepticism of authority and state power, but they diverge on the scope of their opposition to existing political and economic systems. Various schools of libertarian thought offer a range of views regarding the legitimate functions of state and private power, often calling for the restriction or dissolution of coercive social institutions.

Controversy

In his later years, Hogan's contrarian and anti-authoritarian views favored those widely considered "fringe". He was a proponent of Immanuel Velikovsky's version of catastrophism, [5] and of the Peter Duesberg hypothesis that AIDS is caused by pharmaceutical [6] use rather than HIV (see AIDS denialism). [7] He criticized gradualism in evolution, [8] [9] though he did not propose theistic creationism as an alternative. Hogan was skeptical of the theories on climate change and ozone depletion. [10]

Immanuel Velikovsky Russian psychiatrist

Immanuel Velikovsky was a Russian independent scholar who wrote a number of books reinterpreting the events of ancient history, in particular the US bestseller Worlds in Collision published in 1950. Earlier, he had played a role in the founding of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel, and was a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst. Velikovsky's work is frequently cited as a canonical example of pseudoscience and has been used as an example of the demarcation problem.

Catastrophism theory that the Earth had largely been shaped by sudden, short-lived, violent events

Catastrophism was the theory that the Earth had largely been shaped by sudden, short-lived, violent events, possibly worldwide in scope. This was in contrast to uniformitarianism, in which slow incremental changes, such as erosion, created all the Earth's geological features. Uniformitarianism held that the present was the key to the past, and that all geological processes throughout the past were like those that can be observed now. Since the early disputes, a more inclusive and integrated view of geologic events has developed, in which the scientific consensus accepts that there were some catastrophic events in the geologic past, but these were explicable as extreme examples of natural processes which can occur.

Peter H. Duesberg is a German American molecular biologist and a professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California, Berkeley. He is known for his early research into genetic aspects of cancer. He played a pivotal role in the AIDS denialism controversy as a proponent of the belief that HIV does not cause AIDS.

Hogan also espoused the idea that the Holocaust did not happen in the manner described by mainstream historians, writing that he found the work of Arthur Butz and Mark Weber to be "more scholarly, scientific, and convincing than what the history written by the victors says." [11] Such theories were seen by many[ who? ] to contradict his views on scientific rationality;[ how? ] he repeatedly stated that these theories held his attention due to the high quality of their presentation – a quality he believed established sources should attempt to emulate, rather than resorting to attacking their originators. [ citation needed ]

In March 2010, in an essay defending Holocaust denier Ernst Zündel, Hogan stated that the mainstream history of the Holocaust includes "claims that are wildly fantastic, mutually contradictory, and defy common sense and often physical possibility." [12]

Bibliography

Novels

Short stories

Short story collections and fixups

Omnibus editions

Compilations of novels in the "Giants series".

Non-fiction

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References

  1. Holland, Steve (5 August 2010). "James P Hogan obituary". The Guardian . Retrieved 17 May 2012.
  2. Silver, Steven H. (12 July 2010). "Obituary: James P. Hogan". SF Site.
  3. "Bibliography". www.jamesphogan.com. Retrieved 2017-03-20.
  4. "Voyage from Yesteryear". www.jamesphogan.com. Retrieved 2017-03-20.
  5. Hogan, James P. "The Case for Taking Velikovsky Seriously". Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 18 June 2006.
  6. Hogan, James P. (April 1999). Rockets, Redheads & Revolution. Baen Books. pp. 151–173. ISBN   0-671-57807-3."Well here's what happens to politically incorrect science when it gets in the way of a bandwagon being propelled by 'lots' of money- and to a scientist who ignores it and attempts simply to point at what the fact seem to be trying to say."... "The 'side effects' <of AZT> look just like AIDS."
  7. Hogan, James P. "Bulletin Board: AIDS Skepticism". Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 1 February 2007.
  8. Hogan, James P. "The Rush to Embrace Darwinism" . Retrieved 1 February 2007.
  9. Hogan, James P. (April 1999). Rockets, Redheads & Revolution. Baen Books. pp. 175–192. ISBN   0-671-57807-3."My own belief, if it isn't obvious already, is that the final story will eventually come together along such catastrophist lines."
  10. James P. Hogan. Kicking the Sacred Cow. Riverdale, NY: Baen. ISBN   0-7434-8828-8.
  11. Hogan, James P. (2006). "FREE-SPEECH HYPOCRISY (22 February 2006 commentary)". Archived from the original on 3 May 2006. Retrieved 3 May 2006.
  12. Hogan, James P. (2010). "Here's To You, Ernst Zundel: A Lonely Voice of Courage" . Retrieved 15 July 2010.