James Small (rugby player)

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James Small
Date of birth (1969-02-10) February 10, 1969 (age 49)
Place of birth Cape Town, South Africa
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Weight 89 kg (196 lb; 14.0 st)
School Greenside High School
Rugby union career
Position(s) Wing
Senior career
YearsTeamApps(Points)
Super Rugby
YearsTeamApps(Points)
National team(s)
YearsTeamApps(Points)
1992–1997 South Africa 47 (100)

James Small (born 10 February 1969) is a former South African rugby union footballer who played on the wing for the Springboks. His international debut was against the All Blacks in 1992 and he made his final appearance against Scotland in 1997. In that final test match, he scored his 20th try, becoming the leading Springbok try scorer, eclipsing Danie Gerber's record [1] [2] . He was also the leading try scorer in the 1996 Super 12 season.

South Africa Republic in the southernmost part of Africa

South Africa, officially the Republic of South Africa (RSA), is the southernmost country in Africa. It is bounded to the south by 2,798 kilometres (1,739 mi) of coastline of Southern Africa stretching along the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans; to the north by the neighbouring countries of Namibia, Botswana, and Zimbabwe; and to the east and northeast by Mozambique and Eswatini (Swaziland); and it surrounds the enclaved country of Lesotho. South Africa is the largest country in Southern Africa and the 25th-largest country in the world by land area and, with over 57 million people, is the world's 24th-most populous nation. It is the southernmost country on the mainland of the Old World or the Eastern Hemisphere. About 80 percent of South Africans are of Sub-Saharan African ancestry, divided among a variety of ethnic groups speaking different African languages, nine of which have official status. The remaining population consists of Africa's largest communities of European (White), Asian (Indian), and multiracial (Coloured) ancestry.

Rugby union Team sport, code of rugby football

Rugby union, commonly known in most of the world simply as rugby, is a contact team sport which originated in England in the first half of the 19th century. One of the two codes of rugby football, it is based on running with the ball in hand. In its most common form, a game is between two teams of 15 players using an oval-shaped ball on a rectangular field with H-shaped goalposts at each end.

South Africa national rugby union team national sports team

The South Africa national rugby union team, commonly known as the Springboks, is governed by the South African Rugby Union. The Springboks play in green and gold jerseys with white shorts, and their emblems are the Springbok and the King Protea. The team has been representing South Africa in international rugby union since 30 July 1891, when they played their first test match against a British Isles touring team.

Contents

Early life and education

Small was born in Cape Town [1] and attended Risidale Primary School and Greenside High School in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Cape Town Capital city of the Western Cape province and legislative capital of South Africa

Cape Town is the oldest city in South Africa, colloquially named the Mother City. It is the legislative capital of South Africa and primate city of the Western Cape province. It forms part of the City of Cape Town metropolitan municipality.

Greenside High School is a public co-educational high school in Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa.

Johannesburg Place in Gauteng, South Africa

Johannesburg is the largest city in South Africa and one of the 50 largest urban areas in the world. It is the provincial capital and largest city of Gauteng, which is the wealthiest province in South Africa. While Johannesburg is not one of South Africa's three capital cities, it is the seat of the Constitutional Court. The city is located in the mineral-rich Witwatersrand range of hills and is the centre of large-scale gold and diamond trade.

Rugby Career

After the fall of apartheid, when the Springboks were being taught the lyrics to the new South African national anthem, "Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika", Small was particularly enthusiastic about learning the lyrics. [3] He stated that the reason for this was because that in his early days of playing rugby, he too was discriminated against, by Afrikaner players for being of British descent rather than Dutch like they were. [3] When the Springboks visited Robben Island on a tour, Small was very moved by what he saw and visibly wept, [3] recalling later that "Thinking about Mandela's cell and how he spent twenty-seven years in prison and came out with love and friendship. All that washed over me, that huge realization, and the tears just rolled down my face." [3]

Apartheid system of racial segregation enforced through legislation in South Africa

Apartheid was a system of institutionalised racial segregation that existed in South Africa from 1948 until the early 1990s. Apartheid was characterised by an authoritarian political culture based on baasskap, which encouraged state repression of Black African, Coloured, and Asian South Africans for the benefit of the nation's minority white population. The economic legacy and social effects of apartheid continue to the present day.

Nkosi Sikelel iAfrika hymn originally composed in 1897 by Enoch Sontonga

"Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika" is a hymn originally composed in 1897 by Enoch Sontonga, a Xhosa clergyman at a Methodist mission school near Johannesburg. The song became a pan-African liberation song and versions of it were later adopted as the national anthems of five states in Africa including Zambia, Tanzania, Namibia and Zimbabwe after independence. Zimbabwe and Namibia have since adopted new compositions for their national anthems. The song's melody is currently used as the national anthem of Tanzania and the national anthem of Zambia; and since 1997, in the national anthem of South Africa.

Robben Island Island in Table Bay, Western Cape, South Africa

Robben Island is an island in Table Bay, 6.9 kilometres (4.3 mi) west of the coast of Bloubergstrand, Cape Town, South Africa. The name is Dutch for "seal island." Robben Island is roughly oval in shape, 3.3 km (2.1 mi) long north-south, and 1.9 km (1.2 mi) wide, with an area of 5.08 km2 (1.96 sq mi). It is flat and only a few metres above sea level, as a result of an ancient erosion event. Nobel Laureate and former President of South Africa Nelson Mandela was imprisoned there for 18 of the 27 years he served behind bars before the fall of apartheid. To date, three former inmates of Robben Island have gone on to become President of South Africa: Nelson Mandela, Kgalema Motlanthe, and Jacob Zuma.

Small faced Jonah Lomu as his opposite man in the final of the 1995 World Cup. Lomu had scored four tries in New Zealand's semi final against England, but Small and his teammates managed to contain Lomu, preventing him from scoring. The Springboks won the match and the Cup.

Jonah Lomu New Zealand rugby union player

Jonah Tali Lomu was a New Zealand rugby union player. He became the youngest ever All Black when he played his first international in 1994 at the age of 19 years and 45 days. Playing on the wing Lomu finished his international career with 63 caps and 37 tries. He is regarded as the first true global superstar of rugby and consequently had a huge impact on the game. Lomu was inducted into the International Rugby Hall of Fame on 9 October 2007, and the IRB Hall of Fame on 24 October 2011.

The 1995 Rugby World Cup was the third Rugby World Cup. It was hosted and won by South Africa, and was the first Rugby World Cup in which every match was held in one country.

Small's career was marred by his verbal abuse of others on the rugby field, gaining notoriety as being the "bad boy" of the Springbok team. [1] [3] He became the first Springbok to ever be sent off, as a result of dissent towards referee Ed Morison. [4] Small was also alleged by his teammate Chester Williams to have uttered racist abuse towards him in his authorised biography, though as an opponent in provincial rugby, not as a Springbok teammate. [5] [3]

Chester Mornay Williams is a former South African rugby union rugby player. He played as a winger for the Springboks from 1993 to 2000. Williams also played rugby for the Western Province in the Currie Cup.

Business Interests

During his time as being a rugby player, Small worked as a model. [3] . Today he owns a number of restaurants including Café Caprice in Camps Bay. [6]

Camps Bay Suburb of Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

Camps Bay is an affluent suburb of Cape Town, South Africa, and the small bay on the west cost of the Cape Peninsula after which it is named. In summer it attracts a large number of foreign visitors as well as South Africans.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "SA Rugby Player Profile – James Small". South African Rugby Union. Retrieved 3 January 2018.
  2. Bill McLaren. James Small - The Record Breaker (video). Real Rugby. Event occurs at 33:30 - 35:10. Retrieved 10 Feb 2018.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Carlin, John. Playing the Enemy: Nelson Mandela and the Game That Made a Nation . Retrieved 3 January 2018 via Google Books.
  4. "Interview: Chester Williams". The Guardian. 18 November 2002. Retrieved 28 September 2016.
  5. Keohane, Mark (2002). Chester - A Biography of Courage. Don Nelson. ISBN   1-86806-209-0.
  6. "Cafe Caprice". iafrica. 2004-03-25. Retrieved 2012-09-23.