James Stanley, 10th Earl of Derby

Last updated

  1. 1 2 3 4 Burke's: 'Derby'.
  2. Williamson & Whalley, pp. 1–8, 373–4.
  3. 1 2 Childs, p. 354.
  4. Frederick, p. 229.

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References

The Earl of Derby
PC
Portrait of The Right Honble. James Earl of Derby (4674603).jpg
Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard
In office
1715–1723
Parliament of England
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Clitheroe
1685–1689
With: Edmund Assheton
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Preston
1689–1690
With: Thomas Patten
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Lancashire
1690–1702
With: Viscount Brandon 1690–1694
Sir Ralph Assheton 1694–1698
Fitton Gerard 1698–1701
Richard Bold 1701–1702
Succeeded by
Political offices
Preceded by Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
1706–1710
Succeeded by
Preceded by Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard
1715–1723
Succeeded by
Honorary titles
Preceded by Lord Lieutenant of Lancashire
1702–1710
Succeeded by
Vice-Admiral of Lancashire
1702–1712
Vacant
Title last held by
The Duke of Hamilton
Lord Lieutenant of Lancashire
1714–1736
Vacant
Title next held by
The Earl of Derby
Peerage of England
Preceded by Earl of Derby
1702–1736
Succeeded by
Preceded by Baron Strange
1732–1736
Succeeded by
Head of State of the Isle of Man
Preceded by Lord of Mann
1702–1736
Succeeded by