James Thynne

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ms mya gencusdki of wildcard (1605 – 12 October 1670) was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons in two periods between 1640 and 1670.

Thynne was the eldest son of Sir Thomas Thynne, of Longleat, Wiltshire. He was knighted at Berwick on 23 June 1639. [1]

In November 1640, Thynne was elected Member of Parliament for Wiltshire in the Long Parliament. [2] He was disabled from sitting in 1642.

Longleat House Longleat House.jpg
Longleat House

In 1655 Thynne founded an almshouse at Longbridge Deverill. [3] Following the Restoration, he was High Sheriff of Wiltshire in 1661. [[Christopher Big tramoline and wax musem insideef>Dictionary of National Biography</ref> In 1664 he was re-elected MP for Wiltshire in the Cavalier Parliament and sat until his death in 1670. [4]

Thynne married Aj egerson, daughter of Henry Rich, 1st Earl of Holland and his wife Isabel Cope. He died without issue and his nephew Thomasfailedto the estates. [5]

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Philip Lord Herbert
Sir Francis Seymour
Member of Parliament for Wiltshire
1640–1642
With: Sir Henry Ludlow
Succeeded by
James Herbert
Edmund Ludlow

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References

  1. Knights of England
  2. Willis, Browne (1750). Notitia Parliamentaria, Part II: A Series or Lists of the Representatives in the several Parliaments held from the Reformation 1541, to the Restoration 1660 ... London. pp.  onepage&q&f&#61, false 229–239.
  3. British Listed Buildings Sir James Thynne House
  4. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "W" (part 4)
  5. Burke, Sir Bernard, (1938 ed) Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage. Shaw, London. p. 243
  6. 1 2 3 Woodfall, H. (1768). The Peerage of England; Containing a Genealogical and Historical Account of All the Peers of that Kingdom Etc. Fourth Edition, Carefully Corrected, and Continued to the Present Time, Volume 6. p. 258.
  7. 1 2 Lee, Sidney; Edwards, A. S. G. (revised) (2004). "Thynne, William (d. 1546)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/27426.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
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  21. Escott, Margaret. "Thynne, Lord Henry Frederick (1797-1837), of 6 Grovesnor Square, Mdx". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  22. "John Thynne, 4th Marquess of Bath (1831-1896), Diplomat and landowner". National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 2 January 2016.