James Van Trees

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James Van Trees
James Van Trees - American Cinematographer 15Jan1922.jpg
BornAugust 13, 1890 (1890-08-13)
DiedApril 11, 1973 (1973-04-12) (aged 82)
Occupation Cinematographer
Years active1915–1973
Parent Julia Crawford Ivers (mother)

James Crawford Van Trees (August 13, 1890 – April 11, 1973) [1] was an American cinematographer in Hollywood whose career spanned the silent and sound eras.

Contents

Biography

His father was Franklin S. Van Trees (1866-1914), a society architect, best known for his mansions in the Pacific Heights area of San Francisco, such as the Baron Edward S. Rothschild house on Jackson Street. His mother was silent era scriptwriter Julia Crawford Ivers. Mother and son worked together on a few films more than likely becoming the first mother and son to direct and film productions.

Van Trees was the President of the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) during 1923–1924. His son James Van Trees, Jr. was a cameraman and worked for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer with his father.

Partial filmography

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