Japan Railway Construction, Transport and Technology Agency

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The Japan Railway Construction, Transport and Technology Agency (独立行政法人鉄道建設・運輸施設整備支援機構, Dokuritsu-gyōsei-hōjin Tetsudō Kensetsu Un'yu Shisetsu Seibi Shien Kikō), JRTT, is an Independent Administrative Institution created by an Act of the National Diet, effective October 1, 2003. JRTT was founded by integrating the Japan Railway Construction Public Corporation (JRCC) and the Corporation for Advanced Transport and Technology (CATT).

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Lines of business

As its name implies, JRTT is involved in construction and technical support for railway and other transportation projects throughout Japan. JRTT has undertaken numerous railway construction projects during its existence, including:

JRTT is currently working on construction of the Hokuriku Shinkansen and Hokkaido Shinkansen high-speed rail projects.

In addition to its railway construction projects, JRTT has also sponsored maritime research, including the latest ship used as the JR Miyajima Ferry.

JRTT also performs administrative functions related to the liquidation of the Japanese National Railways, such as management of JNR employee pensions.

Subsidiaries

JRTT is currently the parent entity of the following JR Group companies:

In 2011, the National Diet passed legislation requiring JRTT to use its retained earnings from other businesses for the purpose of Shinkansen construction and capital expenditures at its subsidiary railway companies.

JRTT was also a shareholder of the West Japan Railway Company and Central Japan Railway Company before offering those shares to the public. (The East Japan Railway Company was privatized shortly before JRTT was founded.)

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Shinkansen Japanese high-speed rail system

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East Japan Railway Company Japanese railway company

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West Japan Railway Company Japanese railway company

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Central Japan Railway Company Japanese railway company

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Rail transport in Japan Railway transport in Japan

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The history of rail transport in Japan began in the late Edo period. There have been four main stages:

  1. Stage 1, from 1872, the first line, from Tokyo to Yokohama, to the end of the Russo-Japanese war;
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Japan Railway Construction Public Corporation (JRCC) was a public corporation responsible for the construction of railway lines in Japan.

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High-speed rail in East Asia refers to the high-speed rail systems of China, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan, which together are approaching a length of 15,000 km (9,300 mi).