Japan women's national football team

Last updated

Japan
Nadeshiko 2017 logo.png
Nickname(s) なでしこジャパン (Nadeshiko Japan)
Association Japan Football Association
Confederation AFC (Asia)
Sub-confederation EAFF (East Asia)
Head coach Asako Takakura
Captain Saki Kumagai
Most caps Homare Sawa (205)
Top scorer Homare Sawa (83)
FIFA code JPN
Kit left arm jpn18h.png
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Kit body jpn18 woman h.png
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Kit right arm jpn18h.png
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Kit shorts jpn18h.png
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Kit socks jpn18h.png
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
Kit left arm jpn18a.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body jpn18a.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm jpn18a.png
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Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 8 Decrease2.svg 1 (7 December 2018) [1]
Highest3 (December 2011)
Lowest14 (July 2003)
First international
Flag of Chinese Taipei (FIFA).svg  Chinese Taipei 1–0 Japan  Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg
(Hong Kong; 7 June 1981)
Biggest win
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 21–0 Guam  Flag of Guam.svg
(Guangzhou, China; 5 December 1997)
Biggest defeat
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 9–0 Japan  Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg
(Charlotte, United States; 29 April 1999)
World Cup
Appearances8 (first in 1991 )
Best result Gold medal with cup.svg Champions (2011)
Olympic Games
Appearances4 (first in 1996 )
Best result Silver medal with cup.svg Runners-up (2012)
Asian Cup
Appearances16 (first in 1977 )
Best result Gold medal with cup.svg Champions (2014, 2018)

The Japan women's national football team, or Nadeshiko Japan (なでしこジャパン), represents Japan in association football and is run by the Japan Football Association (JFA). It is the most successful women's national team from the Asian Football Confederation. Its highest ranking in the FIFA Women's World Rankings is 3rd (December 2011). [2]

Yamato nadeshiko Japanese term meaning the "personification of an idealized Japanese woman"

Yamato nadeshiko is a Japanese term meaning the "personification of an idealized Japanese woman", or "the epitome of pure, feminine beauty". It is a floral metaphor, combining the words Yamato, an ancient name for Japan, and nadeshiko, a delicate frilled pink carnation called Dianthus superbus, whose kanji translate into English as "caressable child".

Japan Constitutional monarchy in East Asia

Japan is an island country in East Asia. Located in the Pacific Ocean, it lies off the eastern coast of the Asian continent and stretches from the Sea of Okhotsk in the north to the East China Sea and the Philippine Sea in the south.

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

Contents

The team were champions in the 2008 and 2010 EAFF Women's Football Championships, and won the gold medal in the 2010 Asian Games. Japan defeated the United States in the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Final, thus claiming their first FIFA Women's World Cup title, becoming the first Asian team to do so and only the fourth women's world champions. [3] It won silver medals at the 2012 Summer Olympics and the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, making it the only Asian team to have three combined medals from international championships. [4] They also won the gold medal at the 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup. The team most recently won the 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup and the 2018 Asian Games.

2008 EAFF Womens Football Championship

The Second EAFF Women's Football Championship was a football competition held from February 18 to February 24, 2008 in Chongqing, China. Japan won the second edition by beating its opponents to finish first, DPR Korea finished second. The winner of the tournament received 50,000 US Dollars, the runner up 30,000, the third placed team 20,000 and the fourth placed team 15,000.

The third edition of the EAFF Women's Football Championship was held in 2010, with a preliminary qualification tournament held in 2009.

Football at the 2010 Asian Games was held in Guangzhou, Guangdong, China from 7 to 25 November 2010. The opening match was played 5 days prior to the opening ceremony. In this tournament, 24 teams played in the men's competition, and 7 teams participated in women's competition.

History

70s and 80s

During the 1970s, the number of women football players and teams increased in Japan, and teams made up regional leagues in various parts of Japan. In 1980, "All-Japan Women's Football Championship" was held, and in 1981 the Japan women's national football team played its first international match in Hong Kong. The team continued playing matches in Japan or in other countries, but it was not an "All Japan" national team but a temporarily organized team selected from the regional leagues. [5]

Hong Kong East Asian city

Hong Kong, officially the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China and commonly abbreviated as HK, is a special administrative region on the eastern side of the Pearl River estuary in southern China. With over 7.4 million people of various nationalities in a 1,104-square-kilometre (426 sq mi) territory, Hong Kong is the world's fourth most densely populated region.

In 1986, Ryohei Suzuki was selected as the coach of the Japan women's national football team, the first "All Japan" team. In 1989, the "Japan Women's Football League" (abbreviated to "L. League") was established, and the women’s national team qualified for the "1991 FIFA Women's World Cup" in China.

Ryohei Suzuki is a Japanese actor who is represented by the talent agency Horipro.

1991 FIFA Womens World Cup 1991 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup was the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It took place in Guangdong, China from 16 to 30 November 1991. FIFA, football's international governing body selected China as host nation as Guangdong had hosted a prototype world championship three years earlier, the 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament. Matches were played in the state capital, Guangzhou, as well as in Foshan, Jiangmen and Zhongshan. The competition was sponsored by Mars, Incorporated. With FIFA still reluctant to bestow their "World Cup" brand, the tournament was officially known as the 1st FIFA World Championship for Women's Football for the M&M's Cup.

Verge of decline

Japan women's national football team attended various championship tournaments such as the 1996 Summer Olympics and the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup which had made the national team and the L. League very popular. However, in 1999, Japan failed to qualify for the 2000 Summer Olympics, and this helped to cause the withdrawal of a series of teams from the L. League. Japanese women’s football was on the verge of decline.

1996 Summer Olympics Games of the XXVI Olympiad, in Atlanta

The 1996 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad, commonly known as Atlanta 1996, and also referred to as the Centennial Olympic Games, were an international multi-sport event that was held from July 19 to August 4, 1996, in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. These Games, which were the fourth Summer Olympics to be hosted by the United States, marked the centenary of the 1896 Summer Olympics in Athens—the inaugural edition of the modern Olympic Games. They were also the first since 1924 to be held in a different year from a Winter Olympics, under a new IOC practice implemented in 1994 to hold the Summer and Winter Games in alternating, even-numbered years.

1995 FIFA Womens World Cup 1995 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup, the second edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in Sweden and won by Norway. The tournament featured 12 women's national teams from six continental confederations. The 12 teams were drawn into three groups of four and each group played a round-robin tournament. At the end of the group stage, the top two teams and two best third-ranked teams advanced to the knockout stage, beginning with the quarter-finals and culminating with the final at Råsunda Stadium on 18 June 1995.

2000 Summer Olympics Games of the XXVII Olympiad, held in Sydney in 2000

The 2000 Summer Olympic Games, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad and commonly known as Sydney 2000 or the Millennium Olympic Games/Games of the New Millennium, were an international multi-sport event which was held between 15 September and 1 October 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. It was the second time that the Summer Olympics were held in Australia, and also the Southern Hemisphere, the first being in Melbourne, Victoria, in 1956.

Regeneration

In August 2002, the Japan Football Association appointed Eiji Ueda, who had been coach for the Macau national football team, as the new head coach. Officials expected a revitalization of women's football and planned a team reorganization, aiming for the 2004 Summer Olympics. The team at first went through a losing streak, but Ueda gradually improved the team, and it eventually gained wide support in Japan. In particular, a game against Korea DPR, which decided who would participate in the 2004 Olympics, not only made fans rush to the National Stadium but also was widely watched on TV.

Japan Football Association sports governing body

The Japan Football Association or Japan FA is the governing body responsible for the administration of football in Japan. It is responsible for the national team as well as club competitions.

Eiji Ueda is a former Japanese football player and manager. He managed the Japan women's national team.

Macau national football team national association football team

The Macau national football team represents the Chinese special administrative region of Macau in international association football. The team is supervised by the Macau Football Association. The Macau football team has a ranking that is one of the lowest among the FIFA members. Although usually known as simply Macau, the EAFF refers to the team as Macau, China.

Following the increase in public interest in women's football in Japan, the JFA organized a public contest to select a nickname for the team. "Nadeshiko Japan" was chosen from among about 2,700 entries and was announced on 7 July 2004. "Nadeshiko", a kind of dianthus, comes from the phrase "Yamato Nadeshiko" (大和撫子, "ideal Japanese woman").

2003 and 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup

Japan was dropped with Germany, Canada and Argentina during 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup. Beginning by a 6–0 thrash to newcomer Argentina, but later Japan fell on 0–3 loss to later champion Germany, and 1–3 to Canada, who later won 4th place.

Again, in 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup held in China, they again faced Germany, Argentina and England. They started with a 2–2 draw over England, before beating Argentina 1–0 after 90'. But a 0–2 loss over reigning champion Germany again eliminated Japan from the group stage. Japan's disappointing campaign through two decisive Women's World Cup would not have expected to lead to a 2011 triumph.

Golden Period

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup

The Japan team thanking fans for their support for the humanitarian response to the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami after their World Cup win Selecao japonesa agradece o apoio da torcida (DSC01105).jpg
The Japan team thanking fans for their support for the humanitarian response to the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami after their World Cup win

Japan qualified for the finals by finishing third in the 2010 AFC Women's Asian Cup. After finishing second in their group behind England, Nadeshiko Japan beat two-time defending champion and host nation Germany 1–0 in the quarterfinals, before easily defeating Sweden 3–1 to reach the final.

After the final game finished 2–2 after extra time, Japan beat the United States 3–1 in a penalty shootout, becoming the first Asian team to win the FIFA Women's World Cup, and the first Asian team to win a senior FIFA title. [8] [9] It came right after men's team won the 2011 AFC Asian Cup, marked their most successful year in Japanese football.

2012 Summer Olympics

Japan qualified for the 2012 Summer Olympics by finishing first in the Asian qualifier in September 2011, only 6 weeks after winning the Women's World Cup. At the Olympics, after finishing second in their group behind Sweden, Nadeshiko Japan defeated Brazil 2–0 in the quarterfinals, followed by a 2–1 victory over France, whom Nadeshiko had lost to in a friendly match right before the Olympics, to reach the final.

In a rematch of the World Cup final, Japan was defeated in the Olympic final by a score of 1–2 against the United States, allowing two goals to Carli Lloyd in the 8th and 54th minutes. Yūki Ōgimi scored the lone goal for Japan. [10]

Nadeshiko, 2013 Nadeshiko.jpg
Nadeshiko, 2013

2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup

Despite having won a FIFA Women's World Cup in 2011, Japan entered the 2014 Asian Cup having never previously won the tournament.[ citation needed ] They were drawn with Asia's Queen Australia, host Vietnam and newcomer Jordan.[ citation needed ] Their first match in the group stage of the tournament resulted in a 2–2 draw against the defending champion Australia. [11] Also in the group stage, Japan upset host Vietnam by a 4–0 win before defeating Jordan with a 7–0 win to finish first with a higher goal difference.[ citation needed ]

In the semi-final, Japan beat seven-time champions China 2–1 after 120'. In the final, they met Australia once again and successfully earned a 1–0 win with Azusa Iwashimizu's goal. This marked the first time for Japan to become "Queen of Asia". They became the first Asian team to subsequently win both the FIFA Women's World Cup and AFC Women's Asian Cup.[ citation needed ] Because of their top placement in the tournament, Japan, Australia, China, South Korea and newcomer Thailand secured their spot at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup to be played in Canada the following year. [12]

2015 FIFA Women's World Cup

The national teams of Japan and the United States at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Here they come (19619476868).jpg
The national teams of Japan and the United States at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup

Japan, then fourth in the world, was drawn into Group C for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, with tournament debutants Ecuador, Switzerland, and Cameroon. Nadeshiko Japan won all three games, securing passage into the Round of 16, where they drew yet another tournament debutant in the Netherlands. Saori Ariyoshi and Mizuho Sakaguchi scored goals for Japan, and they ultimately survived a couple of nervy moments to get into the quarterfinals. Against Australia, Japan once again used their technical possession game to frustrate The Matildas and negate their speed. Mana Iwabuchi notched the only goal of the game three minutes from time to send Japan to the semifinals.

Against England in the semifinals, Nadeshiko Japan was able to survive against the tenacious Lionesses, as the two teams traded goals from the penalty spot (Aya Miyama for Japan, Fara Williams for England). Deadlocked from the 40th minute on, Japan got a truly fortunate break as English centre back Laura Bassett, in trying to clear out a Japan cross, ended up scoring an own-goal at the death. This set up a rematch with the United States from the 2011 Women's World Cup.

Unfortunately for Japan, the Americans came out flying and scored four goals in the first 16 minutes of the match, with American midfielder Carli Lloyd scoring a hat trick in the process. Yuki Ogimi brought Japan one back in the 27th minute, and an own goal from Julie Johnston halved the American lead, but Tobin Heath put the final touch on the United States' third Women's World Cup victory.

2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup

Recent schedule and results

The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

Dates and times are shown in Japanese local time, unless otherwise noted.

2018

2019

Head coaches

Players

Current squad

The following 23 players were named to the squad for the 2019 SheBelieves Cup. [13]

Caps and goals as of 6 March 2019 after match against Flag of England.svg  England.

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
211 GK Erina Yamane (山根 恵里奈) (1990-12-20) 20 December 1990 (age 28)260 Flag of Spain.svg Real Betis
11 GK Rei Takenaka (武仲 麗依) (1992-05-18) 18 May 1992 (age 26)00 Flag of Japan.svg INAC Kobe Leonessa
181 GK Ayaka Saitō (齊藤 彩佳) (1991-08-26) 26 August 1991 (age 27)00 Flag of Japan.svg Vegalta Sendai

32 DF Aya Sameshima (鮫島 彩) (1987-06-16) 16 June 1987 (age 31)1065 Flag of Japan.svg INAC Kobe Leonessa
62 DF Saori Ariyoshi (有吉 佐織) (1987-11-01) 1 November 1987 (age 31)651 Flag of Japan.svg Nippon TV Beleza
42 DF Saki Kumagai (熊谷 紗希) (captain) (1990-10-17) 17 October 1990 (age 28)1010 Flag of France.svg Lyon
222 DF Risa Shimizu (清水 梨紗) (1996-06-15) 15 June 1996 (age 22)210 Flag of Japan.svg Nippon TV Beleza
122 DF Risako Oga (大賀 理紗子) (1997-01-04) 4 January 1997 (age 22)30 Flag of Japan.svg Nojima Stella Kanagawa Sagamihara
52 DF Nana Ichise (市瀬 菜々) (1997-08-04) 4 August 1997 (age 21)150 Flag of Japan.svg Vegalta Sendai
242 DF Asato Miyagawa (宮川 麻都) (1998-02-24) 24 February 1998 (age 21)20 Flag of Japan.svg Nippon TV Beleza
232 DF Moeka Minami (南 萌華) (1998-12-07) 7 December 1998 (age 20)20 Flag of Japan.svg Urawa Red Diamonds

23 MF Rumi Utsugi (宇津木 瑠美) (1988-12-05) 5 December 1988 (age 30)1126 Flag of the United States.svg Reign FC
73 MF Emi Nakajima (中島 依美) (1990-09-27) 27 September 1990 (age 28)6714 Flag of Japan.svg INAC Kobe Leonessa
83 MF Moeno Sakaguchi (阪口 萌乃) (1992-06-04) 4 June 1992 (age 26)121 Flag of Japan.svg Albirex Niigata
163 MF Arisa Matsubara (松原 有沙) (1995-05-01) 1 May 1995 (age 23)20 Flag of Japan.svg Nojima Stella Kanagawa Sagamihara
143 MF Yui Hasegawa (長谷川 唯) (1997-01-29) 29 January 1997 (age 22)335 Flag of Japan.svg Nippon TV Beleza
93 MF Hina Sugita (杉田 妃和) (1997-01-31) 31 January 1997 (age 22)40 Flag of Japan.svg INAC Kobe Leonessa
173 MF Narumi Miura (三浦 成美) (1997-07-03) 3 July 1997 (age 21)60 Flag of Japan.svg Nippon TV Beleza

204 FW Kumi Yokoyama (横山 久美) (1993-08-13) 13 August 1993 (age 25)3816 Flag of Japan.svg AC Nagano Parceiro
154 FW Yuka Momiki (籾木 結花) (1996-04-09) 9 April 1996 (age 22)248 Flag of Japan.svg Nippon TV Beleza
134 FW Mayu Ikejiri (池尻 茉由) (1996-12-19) 19 December 1996 (age 22)30 Flag of South Korea.svg Suwon WFC
114 FW Rikako Kobayashi (小林 里歌子) (1997-07-21) 21 July 1997 (age 21)31 Flag of Japan.svg Nippon TV Beleza
194 FW Jun Endo (遠藤 純) (2000-05-24) 24 May 2000 (age 18)30 Flag of Japan.svg Nippon TV Beleza

Recent call ups

The following players have been called up to the Japan squad in the past 12 months.

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Sakiko Ikeda (池田 咲紀子) (1992-09-08) 8 September 1992 (age 26)140 Flag of Japan.svg Urawa Red Diamonds 2019 SheBelieves Cup PRE
GK Ayaka Yamashita (山下 杏也加) (1995-09-29) 29 September 1995 (age 23)250 Flag of Japan.svg Nippon TV Beleza 2019 SheBelieves Cup PRE
GK Chika Hirao (平尾 知佳) (1996-12-31) 31 December 1996 (age 22)10 Flag of Japan.svg Albirex Niigata v. Flag of Norway.svg  Norway, 11 November 2018

DF Shiori Miyake (三宅 史織) (1995-10-13) 13 October 1995 (age 23)170 Flag of Japan.svg INAC Kobe Leonessa 2019 SheBelieves Cup PRE
DF Nanami Kitamura (北村 菜々美) (1999-11-25) 25 November 1999 (age 19)00 Flag of Japan.svg Cerezo Osaka Sakai Training camp, 31 January–4 February 2019
DF Aimi Kunitake (國武 愛美) (1997-01-10) 10 January 1997 (age 22)30 Flag of Japan.svg Nojima Stella Kanagawa Sagamihara v. Flag of Norway.svg  Norway, 11 November 2018
DF Hikari Takagi (高木 ひかり) (1993-05-21) 21 May 1993 (age 25)191 Flag of Japan.svg Nojima Stella Kanagawa Sagamihara 2018 Asian Games
DF Mayo Doko (土光 真代) (1996-05-03) 3 May 1996 (age 22)10 Flag of Japan.svg Nippon TV Beleza 2018 Tournament of Nations

MF Mizuho Sakaguchi (阪口 夢穂) (1987-10-15) 15 October 1987 (age 31)12429 Flag of Japan.svg Nippon TV Beleza 2019 SheBelieves Cup PRE
MF Fuka Nagano (長野 風花) (1999-03-09) 9 March 1999 (age 20)10 Flag of Japan.svg Chifure AS Elfen Saitama Training camp, 31 January–4 February 2019
MF Hinata Miyazawa (宮澤 ひなた) (1999-11-21) 21 November 1999 (age 19)10 Flag of Japan.svg Nippon TV Beleza Training camp, 31 January–4 February 2019
MF Nahomi Kawasumi (川澄 奈穂美) (1985-09-23) 23 September 1985 (age 33)9020 Flag of the United States.svg Sky Blue FC v. Flag of Norway.svg  Norway, 11 November 2018
MF Hikaru Naomoto (猶本 光) (1994-03-03) 3 March 1994 (age 25)180 Flag of Germany.svg SC Freiburg v. Flag of Norway.svg  Norway, 11 November 2018
MF Yu Nakasato (中里 優) (1994-07-14) 14 July 1994 (age 24)200 Flag of Japan.svg Nippon TV Beleza 2018 Asian Games
MF Rin Sumida (隅田 凜) (1996-01-12) 12 January 1996 (age 23)220 Flag of Japan.svg Nippon TV Beleza 2018 Asian Games
MF Madoka Haji (櫨 まどか) (1988-07-08) 8 July 1988 (age 30)70 Flag of Japan.svg Vegalta Sendai v. Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand, 10 June 2018

FW Yuika Sugasawa (菅澤 優衣香) (1990-10-05) 5 October 1990 (age 28)6017 Flag of Japan.svg Urawa Red Diamonds Training camp, 31 January–4 February 2019
FW Mina Tanaka (田中 美南) (1994-04-28) 28 April 1994 (age 24)3314 Flag of Japan.svg Nippon TV Beleza Training camp, 31 January–4 February 2019
FW Riko Ueki (植木 理子) (1999-07-30) 30 July 1999 (age 19)00 Flag of Japan.svg Nippon TV Beleza Training camp, 31 January–4 February 2019
FW Mana Iwabuchi (岩渕 真奈) (1993-03-18) 18 March 1993 (age 25)6120 Flag of Japan.svg INAC Kobe Leonessa v. Flag of Norway.svg  Norway, 11 November 2018
FW Rika Masuya (増矢 理花) (1995-09-14) 14 September 1995 (age 23)276 Flag of Japan.svg INAC Kobe Leonessa v. Flag of Norway.svg  Norway, 11 November 2018

Notes:

Records

As of 17 November 2018

FIFA Women's World Cup

Olympic Games

AFC Women's Asian Cup

AFC Women's Asian Cup record
Hosts / YearResultGPWD*LGSGAGD
Flag of Hong Kong 1959.svg 1975 Did not enter
Flag of the Republic of China.svg 1977 Group Stage200208−8
Flag of India.svg 1979 Did not enter
Flag of Hong Kong 1959.svg 1981 Group stage310213−2
Flag of Thailand.svg 1983 Did not enter
Flag of Hong Kong 1959.svg 1986 Runners-up4202144+10
Flag of Hong Kong 1959.svg 1989 Third place5401371+36
Flag of Japan.svg 1991 Runners-up6411276+21
Flag of Malaysia.svg 1993 Third place5401294+25
Flag of Malaysia.svg 1995 Runners-up5401273+24
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1997 Third place5401331+32
Flag of the Philippines.svg 1999 Fourth place6402366+30
Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg 2001 Runners-up6402305+25
Flag of Thailand.svg 2003 Fourth place6402344+30
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 2006 5302196+13
Flag of Vietnam.svg 2008 Third place5302197+12
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2010 5401162+14
Flag of Vietnam.svg 2014 Champions5410163+13
Flag of Jordan.svg 2018 532092+7
Total16/19785242234765+282
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Asian Games

Asian Games record
Hosts / YearResultGPWD*LGSGAGD
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1990 Runners-up5311178+9
Flag of Japan.svg 1994 421193+6
Flag of Thailand.svg 1998 Third place5302187+11
Flag of South Korea.svg 2002 531183+5
Flag of Qatar.svg 2006 Runners-up5410211+20
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2010 Champions431060+6
Flag of South Korea.svg 2014 Runners-up6411283+25
Flag of Indonesia.svg 2018 Champions5500142+12
Total7/734226610725+82
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

EAFF Women's Football Championship

EAFF Women's Football Championship record
Hosts / YearResultPldWD*LGFGAGD
Flag of South Korea.svg 2005 Third place302101−1
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2008 Champions330082+6
Flag of Japan.svg 2010 330071+6
Flag of South Korea.svg 2013 Runners-up311132+1
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2015 Third place310256−1
Flag of Japan.svg 2017 Runners-up3201440
Total6/61810352716+11
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Honors

International

Med 1.png Champions: 2011
Med 2.png Runners-up: 2015
Med 2.png Runners-up: 2012

Continental

Med 1.png Champions: 2014, 2018
Med 2.png Runners-up: 1986, 1991, 1995, 2001
Med 1.png Champions: 2010, 2018
Med 2.png Runners-up: 1990, 1994, 2006, 2014

Regional

Med 1.png Champions: 2008, 2010
Med 2.png Runners-up: 2013, 2017

Overall official record

CompetitionStageResultOpponentPositionNotes
Flag of Hong Kong 1959.svg 1981 Asian Championship Round 10–1 Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chinese Taipei
0–2 Flag of Thailand.svg Thailand
1–0 Flag of Indonesia.svg Indonesia 3 / 4
Flag of Hong Kong 1959.svg 1986 Asian Championship Round 10–2 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China
10–0 Flag of Malaysia.svg Malaysia 2 / 3
Semifinals4–0 Flag of Thailand.svg Thailand
Final0–2 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China
Flag of Hong Kong 1959.svg 1989 Asian Championship Round 13–0 Flag of Hong Kong 1959.svg Hong Kong
11–0 Flag of Indonesia.svg Indonesia
14–0 Flag of Nepal.svg Nepal 1 / 4
Semifinals0–1 Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chinese Taipei
Third place9–0 Flag of Hong Kong 1959.svg Hong Kong
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1990 Asian Games Main Round0–5 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China
5–0 Flag of Hong Kong 1959.svg Hong Kong
8–1 Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg South Korea
1–1 Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea
3–1 Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chinese Taipei 2 / 6
Flag of Hong Kong 1959.svg 1991 Asian Championship Round 11–0 Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea
4–1 Flag of Hong Kong 1959.svg Hong Kong
12–0 Flag of Malaysia.svg Malaysia
12–0 Flag of Singapore.svg Singapore 1 / 5
Semifinals0–0 (PSO: 5–4) Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chinese Taipei
Final0–5 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1991 World Cup Round 10–1 Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg Brazil
0–8 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden
0–3 Flag of the United States.svg United States
Flag of Malaysia.svg 1993 Asian Championship Round 16–1 Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chinese Taipei
15–0 Flag of the Philippines (navy blue).svg Philippines
4–0 Flag of Hong Kong 1959.svg Hong Kong 1 / 4
Semifinals1–3 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China
Final3–0 Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chinese Taipei
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1994 Asian Games Round 11–1 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China
3–0 Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chinese Taipei
5–0 Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg South Korea 2 / 4
Final0–2 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China
Flag of Sweden.svg 1995 World Cup Round 10–1 Flag of Germany.svg Germany
2–1 Flag of Brazil.svg Brazil
0–2 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden 3 / 4
Quarterfinals0–4 Flag of the United States.svg United States
Flag of Malaysia.svg 1995 Asian Championship Round 11–0 Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg South Korea
6–0 Flag of India.svg India
17–0 Flag of Uzbekistan.svg Uzbekistan 1 / 4
Semifinals3–0 Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chinese Taipei
Final0–2 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China
Flag of the United States.svg 1996 Summer Olympics Round 12–3 Flag of Germany.svg Germany
0–2 Flag of Brazil.svg Brazil
0–4 Flag of Norway.svg Norway 4 / 4
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1997 Asian Championship Round 121–0 Flag of Guam.svg Guam
1–0 Flag of India.svg India
9–0 Flag of Hong Kong.svg Hong Kong 1 / 4
Semifinals0–1 Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea
Third place2–0 Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chinese Taipei
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1998 Asian Games Round 16–0 Flag of Thailand.svg Thailand
2–3 Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea
8–0 Flag of Vietnam.svg Vietnam 2 / 4
Semifinals0–3 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China
Third place2–1 Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chinese Taipei
Flag of the United States.svg 1999 World Cup Round 11–1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Canada
0–5 Flag of Russia.svg Russia
0–4 Flag of Norway.svg Norway 4 / 4
Flag of the Philippines.svg 1999 Asian Championship Round 19–0 Flag of Thailand.svg Thailand
5–1 Flag of Uzbekistan.svg Uzbekistan
14–0 Flag of Nepal.svg Nepal
6–0 Flag of the Philippines.svg Philippines 1 / 5
Semifinals0–2 Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chinese Taipei
Third place2–3 Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea
Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg 2001 Asian Championship Round 114–0 Flag of Singapore.svg Singapore
11–0 Flag of Guam.svg Guam
0–1 Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea
3–1 Flag of Vietnam.svg Vietnam 2 / 5
Semifinals2–1 Flag of South Korea.svg South Korea
Final0–2 Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea
Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg 2002 Asian Games Main round0–1 Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea
3–0 Flag of Vietnam.svg Vietnam
1–0 Flag of South Korea.svg South Korea
2–2 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China
2–0 Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chinese Taipei 3 / 6
Flag of Thailand.svg 2003 Asian Championship Round 115–0 Flag of the Philippines.svg Philippines
7–0 Flag of Guam.svg Guam
7–0 Flag of Myanmar (1974-2010).svg Myanmar
5–0 Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chinese Taipei 1 / 5
Semifinals0–3 Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea
Third place0–1 Flag of South Korea.svg South Korea
Flag of the United States.svg 2003 World Cup Round 16–0 Flag of Argentina.svg Argentina
0–3 Flag of Germany.svg Germany
1–3 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Canada 3 / 4
Flag of Greece.svg 2004 Summer Olympics Round 11–0 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden
0–1 Flag of Nigeria.svg Nigeria 3 / 3
Quarterfinals1–2 Flag of the United States.svg United States Awarded the Fair Play Award
Flag of South Korea.svg 2005 East Asian Championship Main Round0–1 Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea
0–0 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China
0–0 Flag of South Korea.svg South Korea 3 / 4Awarded the Fair Play Award
Flag of Qatar.svg 2006 Asian Games Round 113–0 Flag of Jordan.svg Jordan
4–0 Flag of Thailand.svg Thailand
1–0 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China 1 / 4
Semifinals3–1 Flag of South Korea.svg South Korea
Final0–0 (PSO: 2–4) Flag of North Korea.svg South Korea
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 2006 Asian Championship Round 15–0 Flag of Vietnam.svg Vietnam
11–1 Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chinese Taipei
1–0 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China 1 / 4
Semifinals0–2 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australia
Third place2–3 Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007 World Cup Round 12–2 Flag of England.svg England
1–0 Flag of Argentina.svg Argentina
0–2 Flag of Germany.svg Germany 3 / 4
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2008 East Asian Championship Main Round3–2 Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea
2–0 Flag of South Korea.svg South Korea
3–0 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China 1 / 4
Flag of Vietnam.svg 2008 Asian Cup Round 11–3 Flag of South Korea.svg South Korea
11–0 Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chinese Taipei
3–1 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australia 1 / 4
Semifinals1–3 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China
Third place3–0 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australia
2008 Summer Olympics qualification Final round2–0 Flag of Vietnam.svg Vietnam
4–0 Flag of Thailand.svg Thailand
6–1 Flag of South Korea.svg South Korea 1 / 4
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2008 Summer Olympics Round 12–2 Flag of New Zealand.svg New Zealand
0–1 Flag of the United States.svg United States
5–1 Flag of Norway.svg Norway 3 / 4
Quarterfinals2–0 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China
Semifinals2–4 Flag of the United States.svg United States
Third place0–2 Flag of Germany.svg Germany
Flag of Japan.svg 2010 East Asian Championship Round 12–0 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg New Zealand
3–0 Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chinese Taipei
2–1 Flag of South Korea.svg South Korea 1 / 4
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2010 Asian Cup Round 18–0 Flag of Myanmar (1974-2010).svg Myanmar
4–0 Flag of Thailand.svg Thailand
2–1 Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea 1 / 4
Semifinals0–1 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australia
Third place2–0 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2010 Asian Games Round 14–0 Flag of Thailand.svg Thailand
0–0 Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea 1 / 3
Semifinals1–0 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China
Final1–0 Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea
Flag of Germany.svg 2011 World Cup Round 12–1 Flag of New Zealand.svg New Zealand
4–0 Flag of Mexico.svg Mexico
0–2 Flag of England.svg England 2 / 4
Quarterfinals1–0 Flag of Germany.svg Germany
Semifinals3–1 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden
Final2–2 (PSO: 3–1) Flag of the United States.svg United States Awarded the Fair Play Award
2012 Summer Olympics qualification Final round3–0 Flag of Thailand.svg Thailand
2–1 Flag of South Korea.svg South Korea
1–0 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australia
1–1 Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea
1–0 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg 2012 Summer Olympics Round 12–1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Canada
0–0 Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden
0–0 Flag of South Africa.svg South Africa 2 / 4
Quarterfinals2–0 Flag of Brazil.svg Brazil
Semifinals2–1 Flag of France.svg France
Finals1–2 Flag of the United States.svg United States
Flag of South Korea.svg 2013 EAFF Women's East Asian Cup Final round2–0 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China
0–0 Flag of North Korea.svg North Korea
1–2 Flag of South Korea.svg South Korea
Flag of Vietnam.svg 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup Round 12–2 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australia
4–0 Flag of Vietnam.svg Vietnam
7–0 Flag of Jordan.svg Jordan 1 / 4
Semifinals2–1 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China PR
Final1–0 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australia
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015 World Cup Round 11–0 Flag of Switzerland.svg Switzerland
2–1 Flag of Cameroon.svg Cameroon
1–0 Flag of Ecuador.svg Ecuador 1 / 4
Round of 162–1 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Netherlands
Quarterfinals1–0 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australia
Semifinals2–1 Flag of England.svg England
Final2–5 Flag of the United States.svg United States

Youth national teams

Under-20 team

Under-17 team

See also

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References

  1. "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 7 December 2018. Retrieved 7 December 2018.
  2. "Japan: FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking" . Retrieved 23 June 2017.
  3. "Japan claim maiden title". fifa.com. 17 July 2011. Retrieved 2 July 2015.
  4. "2015 FIFA Women's World Cup: Complete Tournament Results". ABC News. 6 July 2015. Retrieved 6 July 2015.
  5. Hongo, Jun, "Nadeshiko Japan eyes London Olympic gold", Japan Times , 24 January 2012, p. 3.
  6. JFA to show appreciation for support from football family FIFA
  7. Japan banner a global message FIFA
  8. "Japan edge USA for maiden title". FIFA. 17 July 2011. Retrieved 17 July 2011.
  9. "Women's World Cup final: Japan beat USA on penalties". BBC Sport. 17 July 2011. Retrieved 18 July 2011.
  10. "Olympics football: USA beat Japan to secure gold in Wembley thriller". BBC. 12 August 2012. Retrieved 2 July 2015.
  11. "Nadeshiko Japan beats Australia to win Women's Asian Cup". The Japan Times. 26 May 2014. Retrieved 28 October 2014.
  12. "Japan lift 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup". Goal.com. 26 May 2014. Retrieved 28 October 2014.
  13. http://www.jfa.jp/eng/news/00020502/
Sporting positions
Preceded by
2007 Germany  Flag of Germany.svg
World Champions
2011 (first title)
Succeeded by
2015 United States  Flag of the United States.svg
Preceded by
2010 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Asian Champions
2014 (first title)
2018 (2nd title)
Succeeded by
Incumbent