Japanese Central China Area Army

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Japanese Central China Area Army
Iwane Matsui rides into Nanjing.jpg
General Matsui enters Nanjing
ActiveNovember 7, 1937-February 14, 1938
Country Empire of Japan
Branch Imperial Japanese Army
Type Infantry
Role Field Army
Garrison/HQ Shanghai

The Japanese Central China Area Army (中支那方面軍, Naka Shina hōmen gun) was a field army of the Imperial Japanese Army during the Second Sino-Japanese War.

Contents

History

On November 7, 1937 Japanese Central China Area Army (CCAA) was organized as a reinforcement expeditionary army by combining the Shanghai Expeditionary Army (SEF) and the IJA Tenth Army. General Iwane Matsui was appointed as its commander-in-chief, concurrent with his assignment as commander-in-chief of the SEF. Matsui reported directly to Imperial General Headquarters. After the Battle of Nanjing, the CCAA was disbanded on February 14, 1938 and its component units were reassigned to the Central China Expeditionary Army.

List of Commanders

Commanding officer

NameFromTo
1General Iwane Matsui 30 October 193714 February 1938

Chief of Staff

NameFromTo
1Major General Osamu Tsukada 2 November 193714 February 1938

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References