Jarana huasteca

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Jarana huasteca
Jarana huasteca.jpg
Jarana huasteca
String
Other namesJarana de son huasteco, jaranita
Classification String instrument
Hornbostel–Sachs classification
(Composite chordophone)
DevelopedMexico
Related instruments
Huapanguera
Jarana Huasteca tuning. Jarana huasteca.png
Jarana Huasteca tuning.
Jarana huasteco playing El fandanguito
A son huasteco trio, featuring a violin, jarana huasteca and huapanguera. HuapangoAcuarela.JPG
A son huasteco trio, featuring a violin, jarana huasteca and huapanguera.

The jarana huasteca, jarana de son huasteco or jaranita is a string instrument. It is most often called simply jarana.

It is a guitar-like chordophone with 5 strings. It is smaller than the guitarra huapanguera and usually forms part of the trío huasteco ensemble, along with the quinta huapanguera and violin, taking on the role of the rhythmical accompaniment to the ensemble. This type of guitar is tuned in thirds. It is higher in pitch than the guitarra huapanguera. It is in a similar range to the mandolin. [1] The notes are G, B, D, F# and A. It usually has a scale length of around 40 cm.

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Huapango

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Jarana jarocha

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The requinto jarocho or guitarra de son is plucked string instrument, played usually with a special pick. It is a four- or five-stringed instrument that has originated from Veracruz, Mexico.

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References

  1. "The Stringed Instrument Database: Index". stringedinstrumentdatabase.aornis.com.