Jay Livingston

Last updated
Jay Livingston
Jay Livingston photo.jpg
Born
Jacob Harold Levison

March 28, 1915
DiedOctober 17, 2001(2001-10-17) (aged 86)
Alma mater University of Pennsylvania
OccupationComposer
Years active1937–2001
Spouse(s)Lynne Gordon (1947–1991; her death; 1 child)Travilyn
Shirley Mitchell (1992–2001; his death)

Jay Livingston (born Jacob Harold Levison, March 28, 1915 – October 17, 2001) was an American composer best known as half of a songwriting duo with Ray Evans that specialized in songs composed for films. Livingston wrote music and Evans the lyrics.

Composer person who creates music, either by musical notation or oral tradition

A composer is a musician who is an author of music in any form, including vocal music, instrumental music, electronic music, and music which combines multiple forms. A composer may create music in any music genre, including, for example, classical music, musical theatre, blues, folk music, jazz, and popular music. Composers often express their works in a written musical score using musical notation.

Ray Evans American songwriter

Raymond Bernard Evans was an American songwriter. He was a partner in a composing and songwriting duo with Jay Livingston, known for the songs they composed for films. Evans wrote the lyrics and Livingston the music for the songs.

Film sequence of images that give the impression of movement

Film, also called movie or motion picture is a medium used to simulate experiences that communicate ideas, stories, perceptions, feelings, beauty or atmosphere by the means of recorded or programmed moving images along with other sensory stimulations. The word "cinema", short for cinematography, is often used to refer to filmmaking and the film industry, and to the art form that is the result of it.

Contents

Early life and career

Livingston was born in McDonald, Pennsylvania; he was born to a Jewish mother and father. [1] [2] Livingston studied piano with Harry Archer in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He attended the University of Pennsylvania, where he organized a dance band and met Evans, a fellow student in the band. Their professional collaboration began in 1937. Livingston and Evans won the Academy Award for Best Original Song three times, [3] in 1948 for the song "Buttons and Bows", written for the movie The Paleface ; [4] in 1950 for the song "Mona Lisa", written for the movie Captain Carey, U.S.A. ; and in 1956 for the song "Que Sera, Sera (Whatever Will Be, Will Be)," featured in the movie The Man Who Knew Too Much . They also wrote "Tammy" for the movie Tammy and the Bachelor in 1957. Livingston and Evans wrote popular TV themes for shows including Bonanza and Mister Ed , which Livingston sang. [5] They also wrote the Christmas song "Silver Bells" in 1951, for the film The Lemon Drop Kid , initially calling it "Tinkle Bells" but changed it to "Silver" because of the common connotation of "tinkle", as well as "Never Let Me Go" for the 1956 film The Scarlet Hour . Fans of Johnny Mathis can thank Mr. Livingston for All The Time among others.

McDonald, Pennsylvania Borough in Pennsylvania, United States

McDonald is a borough in Allegheny and Washington counties in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania, 18 miles (29 km) southwest of Pittsburgh. In the past, factories of bottles, oil-well drilling tools, flour-mill products, etc., existed here. Oil and coal were and still are procured in the area. The population was 2,149 at the 2010 census. Of this, 1,766 were in Washington County, and 383 were in Allegheny County.

Jews ancient nation and ethnoreligious group from the Levant

Jews or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group and a nation, originating from the Israelites and Hebrews of historical Israel and Judah. Jewish ethnicity, nationhood, and religion are strongly interrelated, as Judaism is the ethnic religion of the Jewish people, while its observance varies from strict observance to complete nonobservance.

Piano musical instrument

The piano is an acoustic, stringed musical instrument invented in Italy by Bartolomeo Cristofori around the year 1700, in which the strings are struck by hammers. It is played using a keyboard, which is a row of keys that the performer presses down or strikes with the fingers and thumbs of both hands to cause the hammers to strike the strings.

Livingston appeared as himself with Evans in the New Year's Eve party scene of the 1950 film Sunset Boulevard .

<i>Sunset Boulevard</i> (film) 1950 film by Billy Wilder

Sunset Boulevard is a 1950 American film noir directed and co-written by Billy Wilder, and produced and co-written by Charles Brackett. It was named after the thoroughfare with the same name that runs through Los Angeles and Beverly Hills, California.

Honors

Livingston is an inductee in the Songwriters Hall Of Fame. [6] In 2004, the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission installed a historical marker in McDonald, Pennsylvania, noting Livingston's historic importance. [7]

The Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC) is the governmental agency of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania responsible for the collection, conservation and interpretation of Pennsylvania's historic heritage. The commission cares for historical manuscripts, public records, and objects of historic interest; museums; archeology; publications; historic sites and properties; historic preservation; geographic names; and the promotion of public interest in Pennsylvania history.

Death

Livingston died in Los Angeles and was interred there in Westwood Memorial Park Cemetery, his tombstone reading, "Que Será, Será". [8] His brother, longtime Capitol Records executive Alan W. Livingston, is best known for creating "Bozo the Clown" and signing Frank Sinatra, The Beach Boys and The Beatles among other legends with Capitol.

Los Angeles City in California

Los Angeles, officially the City of Los Angeles and often known by its initials L.A., is the most populous city in California, the second most populous city in the United States, after New York City, and the third most populous city in North America. With an estimated population of nearly four million, Los Angeles is the cultural, financial, and commercial center of Southern California. The city is known for its Mediterranean climate, ethnic diversity, Hollywood and the entertainment industry, and its sprawling metropolis. Los Angeles is the largest city on the West Coast of North America.

Capitol Records American record label

Capitol Records, Inc. is an American record label owned by Universal Music Group through its Capitol Music Group imprint. It was founded as the first West Coast-based record label "of note" in the United States in 1942 by Johnny Mercer, Buddy DeSylva, and Glenn E. Wallichs. Capitol was acquired by British music conglomerate EMI as its North American subsidiary in 1955. EMI was acquired by Universal Music Group in 2012 and was merged with the company a year later, making Capitol and the Capitol Music Group both a part of UMG. The label's circular headquarter building in Hollywood is a recognized landmark of California.

Alan Wendell Livingston was an American businessman best known for his tenures at Capitol Records, first as a writer/producer best known for creating Bozo the Clown for a series of record-album and illustrative read-along children's book sets. As Vice-President in charge of Programming at NBC, in 1959 he oversaw the development and launch of the network's most successful television series, Bonanza.

His wife, actress Shirley Mitchell, died on November 11, 2013 at 94.

Shirley Mitchell American actress

Shirley Mitchell was an American radio, film, and television actress.

Work on Broadway

Related Research Articles

Frank Loesser American songwriter

Frank Henry Loesser was an American songwriter who wrote the lyrics and music to the Broadway musicals Guys and Dolls and How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying, among others. He won separate Tony Awards for the music and lyrics in both shows, as well as sharing the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for the latter. He also wrote numerous songs for films and Tin Pan Alley, many of which have become standards, and was nominated for five Academy Awards for best song, winning once, for "Baby, It's Cold Outside".

Mitchell Parish was an American lyricist.

Marc Shaiman American composer

Marc Shaiman is an American composer and lyricist for films, television, and theatre, best known for his collaborations with lyricist and director Scott Wittman. He wrote the music and co-wrote the lyrics for the Broadway musical version of the John Waters film Hairspray. He has won a Grammy, an Emmy and a Tony, and been nominated for seven Oscars.

John David Marks was an American songwriter. Although he was Jewish, he specialized in Christmas songs and wrote many holiday standards, including "Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer", "Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree", "A Holly Jolly Christmas", "Silver and Gold", and "Run Rudolph Run".

Leo Robin was an American composer, lyricist and songwriter. He is probably best known for collaborating with Ralph Rainger on the 1938 Oscar-winning song "Thanks for the Memory", sung by Bob Hope and Shirley Ross in the film The Big Broadcast of 1938.

Sammy Fain American composer

Sammy Fain, was an American composer of popular music. In the 1920s and early 1930s, he contributed numerous songs that form part of The Great American Songbook, and Broadway theatre, he was also a popular musician and vocalist

Mack David was an American lyricist and songwriter, best known for his work in film and television, with a career spanning the period between the early 1940s and the early 1970s. David was credited with writing lyrics or music or both for over one thousand songs. He was particularly well known for his work on the Disney films Cinderella and Alice in Wonderland, and for the mostly-English lyrics through which Édith Piaf's signature song "La Vie en rose" gained much of its familiarity among native speakers of English.

Ted L. Koehler was an American lyricist. He was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1972.

Irving Caesar American composer and lyricist

Irving Caesar was an American lyricist and theater composer who wrote lyrics for numerous song standards including "Swanee", "Sometimes I'm Happy", "Crazy Rhythm", and "Tea for Two", one of the most frequently recorded tunes ever written. In 1972 he was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame

Que Sera, Sera (Whatever Will Be, Will Be) Popular song by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans

"Que Será, Será "is a popular song written by the team of Jay Livingston and Ray Evans that was first published in 1956. Doris Day introduced it in the Alfred Hitchcock film The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956), singing it as a cue to their onscreen kidnapped son; it co-stars James Stewart.

Al Stillman was an American lyricist.

"Silver Bells" is a popular Christmas song, composed by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans.

<i>Aaron Slick from Punkin Crick</i> 1952 film by Claude Binyon

Aaron Slick from Punkin Crick is a musical and was a 1952 'hillbilly' movie made by Paramount Pictures, directed by Claude Binyon and produced by William Perlberg and George Seaton. It is based on a 1919 play by Walter Benjamin Hare which was one of the most produced plays in the history of American theater with 40,000 performances, as of 1952, mainly by amateur groups. The cinematography was by Charles Lang and the costume design by Edith Head.

Victor Schertzinger American composer, film director, film producer, and screenwriter

Victor L. Schertzinger was an American composer, film director, film producer, and screenwriter. His films include Paramount on Parade, Something to Sing About (1937) with James Cagney, and the first two "Road" pictures Road to Singapore (1940) and Road to Zanzibar (1941). His two best-known songs are "I Remember You" and "Tangerine", both with lyrics by Johnny Mercer and both featured in Schertzinger's final film, The Fleet's In (1942).

Livingston and Evans were the songwriting and composing team of Jay Livingston (1915-2001) and Ray Evans (1915-2007), who worked on movies, television and stage.

Albert Hague was a German-American songwriter, composer, and actor.

George Wyle, born Bernard Weissman, was an American orchestra leader and composer best known for having written the theme song to 1960s television sitcom Gilligan's Island. He is also the grandfather of musician Adam Levy.

Felix William Bernard was an American conductor, pianist and a composer of popular music. His writing credits include the popular songs "Winter Wonderland" and "Dardanella".

Robert Wells was an American songwriter, composer, script writer and television producer. During his early career, he collaborated with singer and songwriter Mel Tormé, writing several hit songs, most notably "The Christmas Song" in 1945. Later, he became a prolific writer and producer for television, for such shows as The Dinah Shore Chevy Show, as well as for numerous variety specials, such as If They Could See Me Now, starring Shirley MacLaine. He was nominated for several Academy Awards and won six Emmys and a Peabody Award.

References

  1. Bloom, Nate (2006-12-19). "The Jews Who Wrote Christmas Songs". InterfaithFamily. Retrieved 2006-12-19.
  2. Bloom, Nate (December 22, 2014). "All those Holiday/Christmas Songs: So Many Jewish Songwriters!". Jewish World Review.
  3. Spencer Leigh (October 19, 2001). "Obituary: Jay Livingston". The Independent . Archived from the original on January 1, 2008.
  4. Gilliland, John (1994). Pop Chronicles the 40s: The Lively Story of Pop Music in the 40s (audiobook). ISBN   978-1-55935-147-8. OCLC   31611854. Tape 4, side B.
  5. "Livingston Obituary". All Things Considered. NPR. October 18, 2001.
  6. "Songwriters Hall of Fame - Barry Gibb Exhibit Home". songwritershalloffame.org. Archived from the original on December 20, 2008. Retrieved March 23, 2018.
  7. "Jay Livingston (1915-2001) - PHMC Historical Markers". Historical Marker Database. Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission. Retrieved December 10, 2013.
  8. Sam Staggs, Born to be Hurt: The Untold Story of Imitation of Life (2009), p. 216.