Jean-Guy Talbot

Last updated
Jean-Guy Talbot
Chex Jean-Guy Talbot Canadiens.jpg
Born (1932-07-11) July 11, 1932 (age 87)
Cap-de-la-Madeleine, Quebec
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 170 lb (77 kg; 12 st 2 lb)
Position Defence
Shot Left
Played for Montreal Canadiens
Minnesota North Stars
Detroit Red Wings
St. Louis Blues
Buffalo Sabres
Playing career 19521971

Jean-Guy Talbot (born July 11, 1932) is a Canadian retired ice hockey defenceman and coach.

Contents

Career

Playing career

Jean-Guy played in the National Hockey League from 1955 to 1971. During this time, he played for the Minnesota North Stars, Detroit Red Wings, St. Louis Blues, Buffalo Sabres and Montreal Canadiens. While with the Montreal Canadiens, he won seven Stanley Cup championships.

Talbot was well known for being a sound passer. He was also known for having a clean but rather physical style of play which ultimately helped Montreal win Stanley Cups. Talbot wore the #17 during his 13 seasons with Montreal.

Talbot in 1970 with St. Louis Jean-Guy Talbot 1970.jpg
Talbot in 1970 with St. Louis

Over the course of his career he played 1,056 games, scoring 43 goals and adding 242 assists for 285 points. He also collected 1,006 penalty minutes. He was voted a First-Team All-Star in 1961-62 and was selected for six all-star games (1956–57, 1960, 1962, 1965 and 1967). Talbot was also the player who ended Scotty Bowman's hockey playing career by high sticking/slashing him in the head causing a fractured skull.

Coaching career

Talbot took on the St. Louis Blues head coaching position in 1972, replacing Al Arbour who had been fired from the position. [1] He held the position for two years, resigning in February 1974. [2] Talbot signed on as head coach for the New York Rangers in 1977, taking over from John Ferguson, with whom he had played during his tenure with the Canadiens. [3] As coach of the Rangers, Talbot was known for wearing a warmup suit behind the bench during games, rather than the normal business suit worn by most coaches. [4]

Coaching record

TeamYear Regular season Post season
GWLTPtsFinishResult
St. Louis Blues 1972–73 6530287(67)4th in WestLost in Quarter-Finals
St. Louis Blues 1973–74 5522258(52)6th in West(fired)
Ottawa Civics (WHA) 1975–76 4114261296th in West(team folded)
New York Rangers 1977–78 80303713734th in PatrickLost in Preliminary Round
NHL Total200829028

Personal life

He currently lives in Trois-Rivieres, Quebec with his wife of over 50 years. He has two sons, a daughter and five granddaughters.

Awards

Stanley Cup Champion 1956-57-58-59-60-65-66 (All with Montreal)

Career statistics

   Regular season   Playoffs
Season TeamLeagueGP G A Pts PIM GPGAPtsPIM
1949–50Trois-Rivieres RedsQJHL3634779903312
1950–51Trois-Rivieres RedsQJHL4472229136801118
1950–51Shawinigan Cataracts QSHL 10000
1951–52Trois-Rivieres RedsQJHL43123648132410112
1952–53 Quebec Aces QHL2424633
1953–54Quebec AcesQHL6791120581602212
1953–54Quebec Aces Ed-Cup 72022
1954–55 Montreal Canadiens NHL 30110
1954–55Shawinigan CataractsQHL5962834821325714
1954–55Shawinigan CataractsEd-Cup70226
1955–56 Montreal CanadiensNHL66113148090224
1956–57 Montreal CanadiensNHL5901313701002210
1957–58 Montreal CanadiensNHL5541519651003312
1958–59 Montreal CanadiensNHL6941721771101110
1959–60 Montreal CanadiensNHL69114156081128
1960–61 Montreal CanadiensNHL7052631143611210
1961–62 Montreal CanadiensNHL705424790611210
1962–63 Montreal CanadiensNHL70322255150008
1963–64 Montreal CanadiensNHL661131483702210
1964–65 Montreal CanadiensNHL6781422641301122
1965–66 Montreal CanadiensNHL591141550100228
1966–67 Montreal CanadiensNHL6835851100000
1967–68 Minnesota North Stars NHL40004
1967–68 Detroit Red Wings NHL3203310
1967–68 St. Louis Blues NHL230442170228
1968–69 St. Louis BluesNHL6954924120226
1969–70 St. Louis BluesNHL7521517401616716
1970–71 Buffalo Sabres NHL5707736
NHL totals105643242285100615042630142

See also

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References

  1. "Jean-guy Talbot New Blues Coach". Bryan Times. 9 November 1972. Archived from the original on 11 July 2012. Retrieved 4 September 2009.
  2. "Game revives Talbot nightmare". The Spokesman-Review. 31 January 1978. Retrieved 4 September 2009.
  3. "Talbot named Rangers' coach". St. Petersburg Times. 23 August 1977. Retrieved 4 September 2009.
  4. "SI.com - Embarrassing moments - Aug 2, 2006". CNN. 2 August 2006. Retrieved 6 May 2010.
Preceded by
Bill McCreary, Sr.
Head coach of the St. Louis Blues
197274
Succeeded by
Lou Angotti
Preceded by
John Ferguson, Sr.
Head coach of the New York Rangers
1977–78
Succeeded by
Fred Shero