Jean Bourgoin

Last updated

Jean Bourgoin
Born4 March 1913
Died3 September 1991(1991-09-03) (aged 78)
Paris, France
OccupationCinematographer
Years active1935–1972 (film)

Jean Bourgoin (1913–1991) was a French cinematographer. He won the Academy Award for Best Cinematography for the 1962 war film The Longest Day . [1]

Contents

Selected filmography

Related Research Articles

Alexander Knox Canadian actor and writer

Alexander Knox was a Canadian actor on stage, screen, and occasionally television. He was nominated for an Oscar and won a Golden Globe for his performance as Woodrow Wilson in the film Wilson (1944).

Jean Marais French actor

Jean-Alfred Villain-Marais, known professionally as Jean Marais, was a French actor, writer, director and sculptor. He performed in over 100 films and was the muse of acclaimed director Jean Cocteau. In 1996, he was awarded the French Legion of Honor for his contributions to French Cinema.

Maurice Bienvenu Jean Paul Trintignant was a motor racing driver and vintner from France. He competed in the Formula One World Championship for fourteen years, between 1950 and 1964, one of the longest careers in the early years of Formula One. During this time he also competed in sports car racing, including winning the 1954 24 Hours of Le Mans race. Following his retirement from the track Trintignant concentrated on the wine trade.

Arletty 1898-1992 French actress

Léonie Marie Julie Bathiat, known professionally as Arletty, was a French actress, singer, and fashion model. She was found guilty of treason for an affair with a German officer during World War II, but she continued her career which included playing Blanche in the French version of A Streetcar Named Desire.

Serge Reggiani was an Italian-French singer and actor. He was born in Reggio Emilia, Italy and moved to France with his parents at the age of eight.

<i>Two for the Seesaw</i> 1962 film by Robert Wise

Two for the Seesaw is a 1962 American romantic-drama film directed by Robert Wise and starring Robert Mitchum and Shirley MacLaine. It was adapted from the 1958 Broadway play written by William Gibson with Henry Fonda and Anne Bancroft who was awarded the 1958 Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Play in the lead roles.

Donald Houston Welsh actor

Donald Daniel Houston was a Welsh actor whose first two films—The Blue Lagoon (1949) with Jean Simmons, and A Run for Your Money (1949) with Alec Guinness—were highly successful. Later in his career he was cast in military roles and in comedies such as the Doctor and Carry On series.

Gino Cervi Italian actor

Gino Cervi was an Italian actor.

Jean Servais Belgian actor

Jean Servais was a Belgian film and stage actor. He acted in many 20th century French cinema productions, from the 1930s through the early 1970s.

Patrick Barr British actor

Patrick David Barr was an English actor. In his career spanning over half a century, he appeared in about 144 films and television series.

Gerd Oswald was a German director of American films and television.

Russell Metty Cinematographer

Russell Metty, A.S.C. was an American cinematographer who won the Academy Award for Best Cinematography, Color, for the 1960 film Spartacus.

The 20th Golden Globe Awards, honoring the best in film for 1962 films, were held on March 5, 1963.

FC Nancy association football club

Football club de Nancy was a French association football team playing in the city of Nancy, Meurthe-et-Moselle. The team was founded in 1901 and dissolved in 1968.

Noël Roquevert French actor

Noël Roquevert was a French stage and film actor. He appeared in more than 180 films between 1932 and 1972. Roquevert was born in Doué-la-Fontaine and was married to stage and film actress Paulette Noizeux. He died in Douarnenez, France, aged 80.

Vincent Korda Art director

Vincent Korda was a Hungarian-born art director, later settling in Britain. Born in Túrkeve in what was then the Austro-Hungarian Empire, he was the younger brother of Alexander and Zoltan Korda. He was nominated for four Academy Awards, winning once. He died in London, England. He is the father of writer and editor Michael Korda, and the grandfather of Chris Korda.

Werner Hinz German actor

Werner Hinz was a German film actor. He appeared in 70 films between 1935 and 1984.

Fernand Ledoux actor

Fernand Ledoux was a French film and theatre actor of Belgian origin. He studied with Raphaël Duflos at the CNSAD, and began his career with small roles at the Comédie-Française. He appeared in close to eighty films, with his best remembered role being the stationmaster Roubaud in Jean Renoir's La Bête humaine (1938), but he remained primarily a theatrical actor for the duration of his career.

Michel Kelber (1908–1996) was a French cinematographer. Beginning in the late 1920s, he worked on more than a hundred film productions during a lengthy career. Born in Kiev, then part of the Russian Empire, he studied art and architecture in Paris. He started worked as an assistant cameraman in 1928, before progressing to cinematographer four years later. He worked with leading directors such as Jean Renoir, René Clair, Julien Duvivier and Claude Autant-Lara. He also worked for periods in Spain, including during the wartime German Occupation of France.

References

  1. Langman p.51

Bibliography