Jean Debry

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Jean Debry by Jean-Louis Laneuville, 1793 Jean-Louis Laneuville - Portrait of Jean Antoine Joseph Debry.jpg
Jean Debry by Jean-Louis Laneuville, 1793

Jean-Antoine-Joseph de Bry, called Debry (November 25, 1760 in Vervins, Aisne January 6, 1834 in Paris) was President of the National Convention (March 21, 1793 – April 4, 1793), famous for a slogan La patrie est en danger (English: The Fatherland is in danger) he proposed. [1]

Vervins Subprefecture and commune in Hauts-de-France, France

Vervins is a commune in the Aisne department in Hauts-de-France in northern France. It is a subprefecture of the department. It lies between the small streams Vilpion and Chertemps, which drain towards the Serre. It is surrounded by the communes of Fontaine-lès-Vervins, La Bouteille, Landouzy-la-Cour, Thenailles, Hary, Gercy, and Voulpaix. Its population is 2,502 (2015).

Aisne Department of France

Aisne is a French department in the Hauts-de-France region of northern France. It is named after the river Aisne.

Paris Capital of France

Paris is the capital and most populous city of France, with an area of 105 square kilometres and an official estimated population of 2,140,526 residents as of 1 January 2019. Since the 17th century, Paris has been one of Europe's major centres of finance, diplomacy, commerce, fashion, science, and the arts.

Debry was on 8 September 1791 elected as a member of the Legislative Assembly and on 4 September 1792 as a member of the National Convention. He voted for the death sentence of King Louis XVI and became a member of both Comité de sûreté générale (22 January 1793 – 16 June 1793) and Comité de salut public .

He protested against proscription of the Girondins and was active in Thermidor régime. After the coup d'état of 18 Brumaire he supported Bonaparte. He was proscribed as a regicide (1816) and lived in the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Debry returned to France in 1830.

Thermidor eleventh month of the French Republican Calendar, from mid-July to mid-August

Thermidor was the eleventh month in the French Republican Calendar. The month was named after the French word thermal which comes from the Greek word "thermos" which means heat.

Coup détat Sudden deposition of a government; illegal and overt seizure of a state by the military or other elites within the state apparatus

A coup d'état, also known as a putsch, a golpe, or simply as a coup, means the overthrow of an existing government; typically, this refers to an illegal, unconstitutional seizure of power by a dictator, the military, or a political faction.

Kingdom of the Netherlands Kingdom in Europe and the Caribbean

The Kingdom of the Netherlands, commonly known as the Netherlands, is a sovereign state and constitutional monarchy with the large majority of its territory in Western Europe and with several small island territories in the Caribbean Sea, in the West Indies islands.

Jean Debry coats were an item of men's fashion in England; the fashion had begun to date by 1799 [2]

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References

  1. "La Révolution Française : Les Girondins - « La patrie en danger »". www.diagnopsy.com.
  2. The Times,11 December 1799, If the present fashion of nudity continues its career...