Jef Demuysere

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Jef Demuysere
Jef Demuysere1 Tour de France 1929.JPG
Demuysere in 1929
Personal information
Full nameJef Demuysere
NicknameDe Vlaamse stier
Born(1907-07-26)26 July 1907
Wervik, Belgium
Died30 April 1969(1969-04-30) (aged 61)
Antwerp, Belgium
Team information
DisciplineRoad
RoleRider
Major wins
Milan–San Remo (1934)

Jef Demuysere (Wervik, 26 July 1907 Antwerp, 30 April 1969) was a Belgian professional road bicycle racer. He finished on the podium of the Tour de France in 1929 and 1931, and on the podium of the Giro d'Italia in 1932 and 1933.

Contents

Major results

1926
Paris-Arras
1927
Ronde van Vlaanderen for amateurs
1929
Paris-Longwy
Tour de France:
Winner stage 10
3rd place overall classification
1930
Circuit du Morbihan
Tour de France:
4th place overall classification
1931
Omloop der Vlaamse Gewesten
Tour de France:
Winner stages 15 and 18
2nd place overall classification
1932
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Belgian National Cyclo-cross Championships
Giro d'Italia:
2nd place overall classification
Tour de France:
8th place overall classification
1933
Giro d'Italia:
2nd place overall classification
1934
Milan–San Remo
1935
Poperinge

Trivia


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