Jeffrey Grey

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Grey, Jeffrey (1988). The Commonwealth Armies and the Korean War: An Alliance Study. Manchester: Manchester University Press. ISBN   0719026113.
  • (1990). A Military History of Australia. Melbourne: Cambridge University Press. ISBN   0521644836.
    • (1999). A Military History of Australia (Revised ed.). Melbourne: Cambridge University Press. ISBN   0521644836.
    • (2008). A Military History of Australia (3rd ed.). Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press. ISBN   9780521875233.
  • (1992). Australian Brass: The Career of Lieutenant General Sir Horace Robertson. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN   0521401577.
  • Dennis, Peter; (1996). Emergency and Confrontation: Australian Military Operations in Malaya & Borneo 1950–66. The Official History of Australia's Involvement in Southeast Asian Conflicts 1948–1975. Vol. 5. St Leonards: Allen & Unwin in association with the Australian War Memorial. ISBN   1863733027.
  • (1998). Up Top: The Royal Australian Navy and Southeast Asian Conflicts, 1955–1972. The Official History of Australia's Involvement in Southeast Asian Conflicts 1948–1975. Vol. 7. St Leonards: Allen & Unwin in association with the Australian War Memorial. ISBN   1864482907.
  • (2006). The Australian Army: A History. The Australian Centenary History of Defence. Melbourne: Oxford University Press. ISBN   0195541146.
  • (2012). A Soldier's Soldier: A Biography of Lieutenant General Sir Thomas Daly. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press. ISBN   9781107031272.
  • (2015). The War with the Ottoman Empire. The Centenary History of Australia and the Great War. Vol. 2. South Melbourne: Oxford University Press. ISBN   9780195576764.
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    Jeffrey Grey
    Jeff Grey.jpg
    Jeffrey Grey at ADFA graduation ceremonies in 1999
    Born
    Jeffrey Guy Grey

    (1959-03-19)19 March 1959
    Died26 July 2016(2016-07-26) (aged 57)
    NationalityAustralian
    Academic background
    Alma mater Australian National University
    University of New South Wales
    Thesis British Commonwealth Forces in the Korean War: A study of a military alliance relationship (1985)
    Doctoral advisorPeter Dennis