Jerónimo de Ayanz y Beaumont

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Jerónimo de Ayanz y Beaumont (1553 March 23 1613 AD) was a spanish soldier, painter, astronomer, musician and inventor.

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He was born in Guendulain (Navarre).

He is best remembered for the invention of a steam-powered water pump for draining mines, [1] for which he was granted a patent by the Spanish monarchy in 1606.

He also improved scientific equipment, developed windmills and new types of furnaces for metallurgy and industrial, military and household use. He invented a bell-like diving suit and even designed a submarine. He died from a serious illness in Madrid, in 1613. [1]

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References

Sources

Davids, Karel & Davids, Carolus A. (2012). Religion, Technology, and the Great and Little Divergences: China and Europe Compared, C. 700-1800. Brill. ISBN   9789004233881.