Jerome Daugherty

Last updated


Jerome Daugherty

SJ
Portrait of Jerome Daugherty.png
Jerome Daugherty in 1904
33rd President of Georgetown University
In office
1901–1905
Preceded by John D. Whitney
Succeeded by David Hillhouse Buel
Personal details
Born(1849-03-25)March 25, 1849
Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.
DiedMay 24, 1914(1914-05-24) (aged 65)
New York City, U.S.
Alma mater
Orders
OrdinationJune 1880
by  James Gibbons

Jerome Daugherty SJ (March 25, 1849 – May 24, 1914) was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit who served in many different capacities at Jesuit institutions throughout the northeast United States, eventually becoming president of Georgetown University in 1901. Born in Baltimore, he was educated at Loyola College in Maryland, before entering the Society of Jesus and becoming a member of the first class at Woodstock College. He then taught various subjects, including mathematics, Latin, Ancient Greek, rhetoric, and the humanities in Massachusetts, New York City, and Washington, D.C., and served as minister at many of the institutions there.

Contents

During his four-year leadership of Georgetown University, he oversaw several construction projects, the largest of which were the demolition of Old South Hall and its replacement with Ida Ryan Hall, and the construction of Hirst Library inside Healy Hall. He also continued his predecessor's work of reforming the curriculum, and managing tensions with the Catholic University of America. After his resignation, he continued his ministry in Maryland, Washington, and Philadelphia, before returning to New York, where he died.

Early life

Jerome Daugherty was born on March 25, 1849, in Baltimore, Maryland, to Jerome M. Daugherty, a printer, and Rose A. Wivel. [1] His ancestry was of German and Irish origin. [2] Beginning in 1858, he attended the parochial school of St. Vincent de Paul Church. In 1863, he enrolled in the preparatory department of Loyola College in Maryland, where he studied for two years. [1] He then entered the Society of Jesus, and was sent to the Jesuit novitiate in Frederick, Maryland, in August 1865. [2] There, he was the spiritual reader to the Jesuit brothers. [3] He remained in Frederick until 1869, before completing his higher studies at Woodstock College. [1] A member of the first class at Woodstock, he studied philosophy for three years. [3]

In 1872, Daugherty was sent to Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., to teach mathematics. [4] After two years, he was transferred to Boston College, [3] where he continued teaching, now Latin and Ancient Greek. [1] He then resumed his education at Woodstock College in 1877, taking up the study of theology under Camillo Mazzella, a future cardinal. [3] In June 1880, [5] he was ordained a priest by Cardinal James Gibbons. He was again sent out to various Jesuit institutions, spending a year at St. Francis Xavier College in New York City and another year at Boston College, where he was made prefect of studies and put in charge of the spiritual care of the municipal hospital. He then began the tertianship of his Jesuit formation. [6]

Jesuit ministry

Daugherty was again sent to Loyola College in 1884, where he was prefect of studies and taught rhetoric, humanities, and mathematics. [6] The following year, he became minister and vice president at Gonzaga College, [5] where he was well-liked and remained for four years. He was then transferred to Georgetown, where he remained a minister for seven years. In 1895, he went continued his ministry at Woodstock College, and took up the additional positions of professor of mathematics and treasurer. The following year, he was sent to the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts, as minister. In January 1901, he returned to New York, [5] where he was appointed socius, [6] or advisor to the Jesuit provincial superior. [7] However, he remained in this position for only a few months, before being appointed president of Georgetown University. [5]

Georgetown University

Hirst Library Healy Hall.png
Ida Ryan Hall after opening.png
Hirst Library inside Healy Hall (left) and Ida Ryan Hall (right) shortly after opening

Succeeding John D. Whitney, [8] Daugherty took office on July 11, 1901. [5] During his presidency, he undertook several building campaigns. He oversaw the start of construction on Ryan Gymnasium, and as well as the erection of Ida Ryan Hall, which required built in the place of the demolished Old South Hall (the oldest building on campus). [8] He also saw that a new wing of the Georgetown University Hospital was built, as well as Kober operating amphitheater, [9] and the Hirst Library, which was dedicated on December 18, 1902. [10]

In addition to physical improvements, he continued the work of his predecessor in instituting a curricular reform. [9] This included adding a fourth year to the course of study at the Law School, beginning lectures in ethics at the School of Medicine, and presided over the establishment of the antecedents of the School of Dentistry, [4] which was then a department of the School of Medicine. [11] There had long been tension between Georgetown and the Catholic University of America, which opened in Washington, D.C., in 1887. [12] During Daugherty's tenure, the president of Catholic University complained to the Jesuit provincial superior that Georgetown's graduate programs were detracting from those of Catholic University. As a result, the provincial ordered Daugherty in 1903 to revise the graduate curriculum; otherwise, the Graduate School would be closed down. Daugherty complied, but the Jesuit Superior General later pressured the university to merge the Graduate School into the College in 1907. [13]

In 1905, Daugherty's health began to deteriorate, and in August of that year, he resigned the presidency, [5] and was succeeded by David Hillhouse Buel. [8] Overall, he was one of the most well-liked presidents of the university in that era. [14]

Later years

After leaving Georgetown, he was sent to Fordham University as spiritual father, [6] where his health recovered and he again took up teaching. He then returned to Woodstock College, where he was spiritual father to the scholastics there for four years. He was then stationed for a short time at Holy Trinity Church in Georgetown, where he took care of the ill and children. Finally, he was sent to the Church of the Gesú in Philadelphia as operarius (visiting priest), [lower-alpha 1] where he soon fell ill. [16]

Suffering from a protracted illness, [17] he underwent surgery at St. Vincent's Hospital in New York City, where he died the following day on May 24, 1914. [5] The future bishop Jerome Aloysius Daugherty Sebastian was named after him. [18]

Notes

  1. An operarius is a Jesuit who undertakes the usual priestly functions away from their home community. [15]

Related Research Articles

John Early (educator) Irish-American Jesuit educator

John Early was an Irish-American Catholic priest and Jesuit educator who was the president of the College of the Holy Cross and Georgetown University, as well as the founder and first president of Loyola College in Maryland. Born in Ireland, he emigrated to the United States at the age of nineteen. Upon his arrival, he enrolled at Mount St. Mary's Seminary in Maryland, and entered the Society of Jesus, completing his education at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

Samuel Cahill

Samuel Cahill was an American Roman Catholic Jesuit priest and academic. He served as President of the College of the Holy Cross from 1887 to 1889.

W. G. Read Mullan

William George Read Mullan, SJ, was an American Jesuit and academic who served as President of Boston College from 1898 to 1903 and President of Loyola University Maryland from 1907 to 1908.

Bernard A. Maguire Irish-American Jesuit priest

Bernard A. Maguire was an Irish-American Catholic priest and Jesuit who served twice as the president of Georgetown University. Born in Ireland, he emigrated to the United States at the age of six, and his family settled in Maryland. Maguire attended Saint John's College in Frederick, Maryland, and then entered the Society of Jesus in 1837. He continued his studies at Georgetown University, where he also taught and was prefect, until his ordination to the priesthood in 1851.

Thomas F. Mulledy 19th-century American Jesuit priest

Thomas F. Mulledy was an American Catholic priest from Virginia who became the president of Georgetown College, a founder of the College of the Holy Cross, and a prominent 19th-century leader of the Jesuits in the United States. His brother, Samuel Mulledy, also became a Jesuit and president of Georgetown.

James A. Doonan American Jesuit educator

James Aloysius Doonan was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit who was the president of Georgetown University from 1882 to 1888, during which time he oversaw the naming of Gaston Hall and the construction of a new building for the School of Medicine. He also acquired two historic cannons that were placed in front of Healy Hall. Doonan was a financially successful president, reducing the university's burdensome debt that had accrued during the construction of Healy Hall.

James A. Ryder 19th-century American Jesuit

James A. Ryder was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit who became the president of several Jesuit universities in the United States. Born in Ireland, he immigrated with his widowed mother to the United States as a child, to settle in Georgetown, in the District of Columbia. He enrolled at Georgetown College and then entered the Society of Jesus. Studying in Maryland and Rome, Ryder proved to be a talented student of theology and was made a professor. He returned to Georgetown College in 1829, where he was appointed to senior positions and founded the Philodemic Society, becoming its first president.

J. Havens Richards American Jesuit educator

Joseph Havens Richards was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit who became a prominent president of Georgetown University, where he instituted major reforms and significantly increased the quality and stature of the university. Born to a prominent Ohio family, his father was an Episcopal priest who controversially converted to Catholicism, and had the infant Richards secretly baptized as a Catholic. Richards eventually entered the Society of Jesus.

Joseph J. Himmel American Jesuit priest and missionary

Joseph J. Himmel was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit. For much of his early life, he was a missionary throughout the northeast United States and retreat master. Later in life, he was president of Gonzaga College and Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

Charles H. Stonestreet 19th-century American Jesuit priest

Charles Henry Stonestreet was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit who served in prominent religious and academic positions, including as provincial superior of the Jesuit Maryland Province and president of Georgetown University. He was born in Maryland and attended Georgetown University, where he co-founded the Philodemic Society. After entering the Society of Jesus and becoming a professor at Georgetown, he led St. John's Literary Institution and St. John the Evangelist Church in Frederick, Maryland. He was appointed president of Georgetown University in 1851, holding the office for two years, during which time he oversaw expansion of the university's library. The First Plenary Council of Baltimore was held at Georgetown during his tenure.

William McSherry 19th-century American Jesuit priest

William McSherry was an American Catholic priest who became the president of Georgetown College and a prominent 19th-century leader of the Jesuits in the United States. The son of Irish immigrants, McSherry was educated at Georgetown College, where he entered the Society of Jesus. As one of the first Americans to complete the traditional Jesuit course of training, he was sent to Rome to be educated for the priesthood. There, he made several discoveries of significant, forgotten holdings in the Jesuit archives, which improved historians' knowledge of the early European settling of Maryland and of the language of Indian tribes there.

Joseph A. Lopez Mexican Jesuit priest

Joseph Anton Lopez was a Mexican Catholic priest and Jesuit. Born in Michoacán, he studied canon law at the Colegio de San Nicolás and the Royal and Pontifical University of Mexico. He became acquainted with the future Empress consort Ana María Huarte and was made chaplain to the future imperial family. He was later put in charge of the education of all the princes in Mexico. Lopez was a close ally of Emperor Agustín de Iturbide, residing in Madrid for four years as his attorney and political informant, and accompanying him during his exile to Italy and England.

John W. Beschter Luxembourg Jesuit missionary

John William Beschter was a Catholic priest and Jesuit from the Duchy of Luxembourg in the Austrian Netherlands. He emigrated to the United States as a missionary in 1807, where he ministered in rural Pennsylvania and Maryland. Beschter was the last Jesuit pastor of St. Mary's Church in Lancaster, as well as the pastor of St. John the Evangelist Church in Baltimore, Maryland. He was also a priest at several other German-speaking churches in Pennsylvania.

Samuel Mulledy 19th-century American Jesuit priest

Samuel A. Mulledy was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit who served as president of Georgetown College in 1845. Born in Virginia, he was the brother of Thomas F. Mulledy, who was a prominent 19th-century Jesuit in the United States and a president of Georgetown. As a student at Georgetown, Samuel was one of the founding members of the Philodemic Society, and proved to be a distinguished student, which resulted in his being sent to Rome to complete his higher education and be ordained to the priesthood. Upon his return to the United States, he became the master of novices at the Jesuit novitiate in Maryland, before being named president of Georgetown. He sought to be relieved of the position after only a few months, and returned to teaching and ministry.

William Feiner German Jesuit missionary

William Feiner was a German Catholic priest and Jesuit who became a missionary to the United States and eventually the president of Georgetown College.

Enoch Fenwick was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit, who ministered throughout Maryland and became the president of Georgetown College. Descending from one of the original Catholic settlers of the British Maryland Province, he studied at Georgetown College in Washington, D.C. Like his brother and future bishop, Benedict Joseph Fenwick, he entered the priesthood, studying at St. Mary's Seminary, before entering the Society of Jesus, which was suppressed at the time. He was made rector of St. Peter's Pro-Cathedral in Baltimore by Archbishop John Carroll, and remained in the position for ten years. Near the end of his pastorate, he was also made vicar general of the Archdiocese of Baltimore, which involved traveling to say Mass in remote parishes throughout rural Maryland.

John D. Whitney American Jesuit educator

John Dunning Whitney was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit who became president of Georgetown University in 1898. Born in Massachusetts, he joined the United States Navy at the age of sixteen, where he was introduced to Catholicism by way of a book that accidentally came into his possession, and prompted him to become a Catholic. He entered the Society of Jesus and spent the next twenty-five years studying and teaching mathematics at Jesuit institutions around the world, including in Canada, England, Ireland, and around the United States in New York, Maryland, Boston, and Louisiana. He became the vice president of Spring Hill College in Alabama, before being appointed President of Georgetown University.

Thomas I. Gasson American Jesuit educator

Thomas Ignatius Gasson was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit. Born in England, he emigrated to the United States at the age of 13, and was taken under the care of two Catholic women in Philadelphia, which led to his conversion to Catholicism soon thereafter. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1875, and studied theology at the University of Innsbruck in Austria, where he was ordained a priest. Upon his return to the United States, he became a professor at Boston College, before being named President of Boston College in 1907.

James A. Ward was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit. He taught for many years at Georgetown and at the novitiate in Frederick, Maryland, of which he twice served as rector. He then became the vice president of Georgetown and was influential in the early years of Loyola College in Maryland. From 1857 to 1860, he was the President of Saint Joseph's College. He spent his later years as socius (assistant) to the Jesuit provincial superior in New York City, and teaching.

William Francis Clarke 19th-century American Jesuit educator

William Francis Clarke was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit who held several senior positions at Jesuit institutions in Maryland and Washington, D.C. Born in Washington, he descended from several early colonial families of Maryland. He was educated at Gonzaga College and its successor institutions during the suppression of the Society of Jesus, followed by Georgetown College. After his entrance into the Jesuit order, he taught for several years at Georgetown, and became the pastor of St. Joseph's Church in Baltimore, where he took uncommon measures to integrate black Catholics and Italian immigrants into parish life.

References

Citations

  1. 1 2 3 4 Gates 1905 , p. 275
  2. 1 2 Woodstock Letters 1914 , p. 385
  3. 1 2 3 4 Woodstock Letters 1914 , p. 386
  4. 1 2 Colby 1915 , p. 198
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "Rev. Jerome Daugherty: Former Head of Georgetown University Dies After Operation". The Catholic Telegraph . LXXXIII (22). May 28, 1914. p. 1. Retrieved August 30, 2019.
  6. 1 2 3 4 Woodstock Letters 1914 , p. 387
  7. Gramatowski 2013 , p. 27
  8. 1 2 3 Senior Class of Georgetown University 1939 , p. 45
  9. 1 2 Easby-Smith 1907 , p. 226
  10. Easby-Smith 1907 , p. 233
  11. "Dental Alumni History: 1900–1930". alumni.georgetown.edu. Archived from the original on September 7, 2015. Retrieved September 12, 2019.
  12. Gorman 1991 , p. 15
  13. Gorman 1991 , p. 24
  14. Easby-Smith 1907 , p. 227
  15. Gramatowski 2013, p. 20
  16. Woodstock Letters 1914 , p. 388
  17. "Gives Up Presidency: Dr. Daugherty Resigns as Head of University". The Washington Post . August 6, 1905. p. 2.
  18. Woodstock Letters 1956 , p. 447

Sources

Academic offices
Preceded by
John D. Whitney
33rd President of Georgetown University
1901–1905
Succeeded by
David Hillhouse Buel