Jerome Weston, 2nd Earl of Portland

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Jerome Weston, 2nd Earl of Portland (16 December 1605 – 17 March 1663) was an English diplomat and landowner who held the presidency of Munster, Kingdom of Ireland.

Contents

Life

He was the second but eldest surviving son of the 1st Earl of Portland, by his second wife Frances Walgrave. He was born at Nayland in Suffolk, England.

Weston was elected to Parliament as member for Gatton on 11 March 1628, but there was a double return. Weston was one of four members returned for two seats, the other three being Sir Samuel Owfield, Sir Charles Howard and Sir Thomas Lake. Weston’s election was declared void on 26 March, when Owfield and Howard were instead declared elected. Weston was instead returned for the vacant seat at Lewes, after the previous holder, Sir George Goring, was elevated to the peerage.

In 1632 and 1633, he undertook a diplomatic mission to the courts of France, Savoy, Florence and Venice. [1] He succeeded his father as Earl of Portland in 1635.

Supplementing his estates, in 1663 as the owner of Coulsdon manor in Surrey had no male heir, Charles II granted it to "Jerome second Earl of Portland" in consideration of his surrender of the presidency of Munster to the Crown. [2]

Engraving of Frances Stuart, Countess of Portland by Wenceslas Hollar after Anthony van Dyck Wenceslas Hollar - Countess of Portland (State 1).jpg
Engraving of Frances Stuart, Countess of Portland by Wenceslas Hollar after Anthony van Dyck

Family

Lord Portland married Lady Frances Stuart (19 March 1617 − 13 March 1694), a daughter of the 3rd Duke of Lennox, on 10 June 1632. He was succeeded by their son Charles.

He was a first cousin of Jeremy Clarke, a Governor of Rhode Island in the American Colonies.

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References

  1. Gary M. Bell, A handlist of British diplomatic representatives 1509-1688 (Royal Historical Society, Guides and handbooks, 16, 1990).
  2. H.E. Malden (editor) (1912). "Parishes: Coulsdon". A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 4. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 20 October 2013.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Anthony Stapley
Sir George Goring
Member of Parliament for Lewes
1628–1629
With: Anthony Stapley
Succeeded by
Parliament suspended until 1640
Political offices
Preceded by
Unknown
Governor of the Isle of Wight
1633–1642
Succeeded by
The Earl of Pembroke
(Parliamentary)
Preceded by
The Earl of Portland
Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire
1635–1646
With: The Earl of Southampton 1641–1646
and The Duke of Richmond
English Interregnum
Vice-Admiral of Hampshire
1635–1646
Vacant
Title next held by
The Earl of Pembroke
(Parliamentary)
Honorary titles
Preceded by
Sir Anthony Ashley Cooper
Vice-Admiral of Hampshire
1660–1662
Succeeded by
The Lord Colepeper
Governor of the Isle of Wight
1660–1661
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Richard Weston
Earl of Portland
1635–1663
Succeeded by
Charles Weston