Jerry Berndt

Last updated
Jerry Berndt
Biographical details
Born (1938-05-11) May 11, 1938 (age 82)
Playing career
c. 1960 Wisconsin–Superior
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1969 Toledo (GA)
1970 Streetsboro HS (OH)
1971–1978 Dartmouth (assistant)
1979–1980 DePauw
1981–1985 Penn
1986–1988 Rice
1989–1992 Temple
1994–1999 Missouri (OC/QB)
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1986–1988 Rice
Head coaching record
Overall55–87–3 (college)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
4 Ivy (1982–1985)

Jerry Berndt (born May 11, 1938) is a former American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at DePauw University, the University of Pennsylvania, Rice University, and Temple University. In two years at DePauw (1979–1980), Berndt guided the Tigers to a 9–9–1 mark, including a 7–2–1 mark in his second season. From 1981 to 1985, he coached at Penn and compiled a 29–18–2 record. In 1984, he won Ivy League Coach of the Year honors. From 1986 to 1988, he coached at Rice, and compiled a 6–27 record. This included an 0–11 season in 1988. From 1989 to 1992, he coached at Temple, where he compiled an 11–33 record. He also served as the offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach at the University of Missouri from 1994 to 1999. He played college football at Bowling Green State University.

Contents

Coaching career

Berndt began his coaching career in the high school football ranks in 1962. He was an assistant at Libbey High School in Toledo, Ohio and at Bedford High School in Temperance, Michigan. In 1969, he worked a graduate assistant at the University of Toledo under head coach Frank Lauterbur. The next year Berndt served as the head football coach at Streetsboro High School in Streetsboro, Ohio. From 1971 to 1978 he was an assistant football coach at Dartmouth College. [1]

Head coaching record

College

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
DePauw Tigers (NCAA Division III independent)(1979–1980)
1979 DePauw2–7
1980 DePauw7–2–1
DePauw:9–9–1
Penn Quakers (Ivy League)(1981–1985)
1981 Penn 1–91–6T–7th
1982 Penn 7–35–2T–1st
1983 Penn 6–3–15–1–1T–1st
1984 Penn 8–17–01st
1985 Penn 7–2–16–11st
Penn:29–18–224–10–1
Rice Owls (Southwest Conference)(1986–1988)
1986 Rice 4–72–67th
1987 Rice 2–90–78th
1988 Rice 0–110–78th
Rice:6–272–20
Temple Owls (NCAA Division I-A independent)(1989–1990)
1989 Temple 1–10
1990 Temple 7–4
Temple Owls (Big East Conference)(1989–1990)
1991 Temple 2–90–58th
1992 Temple 1–100–68th
Temple:11–330–11
Total:55–87–3
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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References

  1. "Ex-Toledoan Berndt Has Penn Near Title". Toledo Blade . November 19, 1982. Retrieved June 21, 2014 via Google News.