Jerry Groom

Last updated
Jerry Groom
Jerry Groom - 1951 Bowman.jpg
Groom on a 1951 Bowman football card
Born:(1929-08-15)August 15, 1929
Des Moines, Iowa
Died:February 29, 2008(2008-02-29) (aged 78)
Sarasota, Florida
Career information
Position(s) DT / C / LB
College Notre Dame
High school Dowling Catholic
(Des Moines, Iowa)
NFL draft 1951 / Round: 1 / Pick 6
Career history
As player
1951–1955 Chicago Cardinals
Career highlights and awards
Pro Bowls 1954

Jerome Paul "Boomer" Groom (August 15, 1929 – February 29, 2008) was an American football player. Born in Des Moines, Iowa, he graduated from Dowling Catholic High School in Des Moines. He played college football for the Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team and was a consensus selection at the center position on the 1950 College Football All-America Team. [1] He then played professional football in the National Football League (NFL) for the Chicago Cardinals from 1951 to 1955. He was chosen to play in the 1954 Pro Bowl.

Contents

Groom later served as a color commentator for the Denver Broncos' radio broadcasts in their inaugural American Football League (AFL) season in 1960. In 1994, he was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. He died at age 78 in Sarasota, Florida

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References

  1. "2014 NCAA Football Records: Consensus All-America Selections" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2014. p. 6. Retrieved August 16, 2014.