Jerry Hines

Last updated
Jerry Hines
Biographical details
Born1903
Mesilla, New Mexico
DiedApril 28, 1963 (aged 69)
Albuquerque, New Mexico
Playing career
Football
1922–1925 New Mexico A&M
Basketball
1923–1926 New Mexico A&M
Position(s) Quarterback (football)
Guard (basketball)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
c. 1927–1928 Las Cruces HS (NM)
1929–1939 New Mexico A&M
Basketball
c. 1927–1929 Las Cruces HS (NM)
1929–1940 New Mexico A&M
1946–1947 New Mexico A&M
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1929–1940 New Mexico A&M
1946–1947 New Mexico A&M
Head coaching record
Overall54–36–10 (college football)
157–109 (college basketball)
Bowls0–0–1
TournamentsBasketball
2–1 (NAIA)
0–1 (NIT)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
1 Border (1938)

Basketball
4 Border (1937–1940)

Gerald H. Hines (1903 – April 28, 1963) was an American football and basketball player, coach and athletic director at New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (New Mexico A&M), now known as New Mexico State University. Hines led the Aggies to multiple successful football and basketball seasons during the 1930s.

Contents

Hines was born in Mesilla, New Mexico in 1903 with twin brother, Harold, to Dr. Lemuel Hines and his wife, Minnie Hankins. Hines attended Las Cruces Union High School from 1918 to 1922 and New Mexico A&M from 1922 to 1926. Hines was a captain of the Aggie basketball team and a quarterback for the Aggie football team.

Hines became head basketball and football coach at New Mexico A&M in 1929, and athletics director in 1930. Both teams excelled under Hines. Between 1934 and 1938, football was 31–10–6, and from 1935 to 1940, the basketball team went 102–36. The football team was invited to the first Sun Bowl in 1936 where they tied the Hardin–Simmons Cowboys, 14–14.

World War II brought an early end to Hines’ coaching career. As a battery commander of the 120th Combat Engineers, a New Mexico National Guard unit assigned to the 45th Infantry Division, Hines was among the first called to military duty in September 1940. He served honorably in Africa, Sicily, and Italy.

Hines ended his coaching career at NMSU with records of 54–36–10 in football, and 157–109 in basketball. He died in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1963 at age 59.

Hines entered the NMSU Athletics Hall of Fame in 1970 was inducted into the Aggie Basketball Ring of Honor in 2009. [1]

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
New Mexico A&M Aggies (Independent)(1929–1930)
1929 New Mexico A&M3–2–3
1930 New Mexico A&M5–3
New Mexico A&M Aggies (Border Conference)(1931–1939)
1931 New Mexico A&M 6–41–25th
1932 New Mexico A&M 4–5–11–2–15th
1933 New Mexico A&M 2–60–46th
1934 New Mexico A&M 4–1–30–1–35th
1935 New Mexico A&M 7–1–24–12ndT Sun
1936 New Mexico A&M 6–4–13–23rd
1937 New Mexico A&M 7–24–12nd
1938 New Mexico A&M 7–24–1T–1st
1939 New Mexico A&M 3–61–46th
New Mexico A&M:54–36–1018–18–4
Total:54–36–10
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

Basketball

SeasonTeamOverallConferenceStandingPostseason
New Mexico A&M Aggies (Independent)(1929–1931)
1929–30 New Mexico A&M12–14
1930–31 New Mexico A&M9–14
New Mexico A&M Aggies (Border Conference)(1931–1940)
1931–32 New Mexico A&M9–101–75th
1932–33 New Mexico A&M7–112–106th
1933–34 New Mexico A&M10–92–66th
1934–35 New Mexico A&M12–64–65th
1935–36 New Mexico A&M19–98–8T5th
1936–37 New Mexico A&M22–515–31st
1937–38 New Mexico A&M22–318–01st NAIA Quarterfinals
1938–39 New Mexico A&M20–414–21st NIT Quarterfinals
1939–40 New Mexico A&M16–712–4T1st
New Mexico A&M Aggies (Border Conference)(1946–1947)
1946–47 New Mexico A&M8–172–149th
Total:157–109 (.590)

      National champion        Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion        Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion      Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

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References

  1. Hines, Walter (January 26, 2009). "Aggie History With Walter Hines: Jerry Hines, 2009 Men's Basketball Ring of Honor Inductee". www.bleedcrimson.net. www.bleedcrimson.net.