Jerry Verno

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Jerry Verno
Two Crowded Hours.jpg
Jerry Verno (centre) in Two Crowded Hours
Born(1895-07-26)26 July 1895
Died29 June 1975(1975-06-29) (aged 79)
OccupationActor
Years active1931–1966

Jerry Verno (26 July 1895 – 29 June 1975) was a British film actor. He appeared in 39 films between 1931 and 1966, including five films directed by Michael Powell, and two with Alfred Hitchcock.

Contents

He was born in London. [1]

As well as appearing in films, he also took the role of Mr. McGregor in a dramatised series of Beatrix Potter tales produced by Fiona Bentley and recorded by HMV Junior Record Club (words by David Croft, music by Cyril Ornadel). [2]

Filmography

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References

  1. "Jerry Verno".
  2. "minigroove – His Masters Voice / Junior Record Club – singles 7". www.minigroove.nl.