Jesse Burkett

Last updated

Jesse Burkett
1920 Jesse Burkett.jpeg
Burkett in 1920
Left fielder
Born:(1868-12-04)December 4, 1868
Wheeling, West Virginia
Died: May 27, 1953(1953-05-27) (aged 84)
Worcester, Massachusetts
Batted: LeftThrew: Left
MLB debut
April 22, 1890, for the New York Giants
Last MLB appearance
October 7, 1905, for the Boston Americans
MLB statistics
Batting average .338
Hits 2,850
Home runs 75
Runs batted in 952
Teams
Career highlights and awards
Member of the National
Empty Star.svgEmpty Star.svgEmpty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svgEmpty Star.svgEmpty Star.svg
Induction 1946
Election MethodVeteran's Committee

Jesse Cail Burkett (December 4, 1868 – May 27, 1953), nicknamed "Crab", was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball from 1890 to 1905. He batted over .400 twice. After his playing career, Burkett managed in the minor leagues. He was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1946.

Left fielder outfielder who plays defense in left field

In baseball, a left fielder (LF) is an outfielder who plays defense in left field. Left field is the area of the outfield to the left of a person standing at home plate and facing towards the pitcher's mound. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the left fielder is assigned the number 7.

Major League Baseball Professional baseball league

Major League Baseball (MLB) is a professional baseball organization, the oldest of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. A total of 30 teams play in the National League (NL) and American League (AL), with 15 teams in each league. The NL and AL were formed as separate legal entities in 1876 and 1901 respectively. After cooperating but remaining legally separate entities beginning in 1903, the leagues merged into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball in 2000. The organization also oversees Minor League Baseball, which comprises 256 teams affiliated with the Major League clubs. With the World Baseball Softball Confederation, MLB manages the international World Baseball Classic tournament.

National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum Professional sports hall of fame in New York, U.S.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is an American history museum and hall of fame, located in Cooperstown, New York, and operated by private interests. It serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, displays baseball-related artifacts and exhibits, and honors those who have excelled in playing, managing, and serving the sport. The Hall's motto is "Preserving History, Honoring Excellence, Connecting Generations."

Contents

Early life

Burkett was born in Wheeling, West Virginia, [1] to Granville and Ellen Burkett. His father was a laborer and painter who worked for the Wheeling and Belmont Bridge Company. [2] Beginning his professional career as a pitcher, he won 27 games at the age of 19 in 1888 in Scranton, Pennsylvania, and also compiled a 39–6 record for the Worcester Club of the New England League. He acquired his nickname, "Crab", due to his serious disposition. [3]

Wheeling, West Virginia City in West Virginia, United States

Wheeling is a city in Ohio and Marshall counties in the U.S. state of West Virginia. Located almost entirely in Ohio County, of which it is the county seat, it lies along the Ohio River in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. Wheeling was originally a settlement in the British colony of Virginia and later an important city in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Wheeling was the first state capital of West Virginia. Due to its location along major transportation routes, including the Ohio River, National Road, and the B&O Railroad, Wheeling became a manufacturing center in the late nineteenth century. After experiencing the closing of factories and substantial population loss following World War II, Wheeling's major industries now include healthcare, education, law and legal services, entertainment and tourism, and energy.

Pitcher the player responsible for throwing ("pitching") the ball to the batters in a game of baseball or softball

In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the pitcher is assigned the number 1. The pitcher is often considered the most important player on the defensive side of the game, and as such is situated at the right end of the defensive spectrum. There are many different types of pitchers, such as the starting pitcher, relief pitcher, middle reliever, lefty specialist, setup man, and the closer.

The New England League was a mid-level league in American minor league baseball that played intermittently in five of the six New England states between 1886 and 1949. After 1901, it existed in the shadow of two Major League Baseball clubs in Boston and alongside stronger, higher-classification leagues.

Major League Baseball career

Burkett made his major league debut for the New York Giants of the National League (NL) in 1890 and had a batting average of .309. He was then purchased by the Cleveland Spiders in February 1891 and played for them through the 1898 season. In 1892, he hit .275 and was among the league's top ten players in runs scored and triples. The next season, his batting average increased to .348 (sixth highest in the league) and drew 98 walks (fifth most in the league). He remained in the top ten in walks in almost every season throughout his career. [1]

National League Baseball league, part of Major League Baseball

The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, known simply as the National League (NL), is the older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States and Canada, and the world's oldest current professional team sports league. Founded on February 2, 1876, to replace the National Association of Professional Base Ball Players (NAPBBP) of 1871–1875, the NL is sometimes called the Senior Circuit, in contrast to MLB's other league, the American League, which was founded 25 years later.

Batting average (baseball)

In baseball, the batting average (BA) is defined by the number of hits divided by at bats. It is usually reported to three decimal places and read without the decimal: A player with a batting average of .300 is "batting three-hundred." If necessary to break ties, batting averages could be taken beyond the .001 measurement. In this context, a .001 is considered a "point," such that a .235 batter is 5 points higher than a .230 batter.

The Cleveland Spiders were a Major League Baseball team which played between 1887 and 1899 in Cleveland, Ohio. The team played at National League Park from 1889 to 1890 and at League Park from 1891 to 1899, being disbanded along with three other teams after a travesty of a season in which the team had a horrific 20-134 won-lost record most closely approached by the 1962 New York Mets.

In 1895, he batted .405 and led the NL in batting average and hits (225). The following season, he set a career-high in batting average, at .410, and led the league in batting average, hits (240), and runs scored (160). [1] Burkett was the second player in major league history to bat over .400 twice, the first being Ed Delahanty. The Spiders finished second in 1895 and 1896 and played the Baltimore Orioles both seasons in the Temple Cup series, beating the Orioles in 1895.

Hit (baseball) in baseball, hitting the ball into fair territory and safely reaching base without the benefit of an error or fielders choice

In baseball statistics, a hit, also called a base hit, is credited to a batter when the batter safely reaches first base after hitting the ball into fair territory, without the benefit of an error or a fielder's choice.

Ed Delahanty Major League Baseball outfielder

Edward James Delahanty, nicknamed "Big Ed", was an American Major League Baseball player from 1888 to 1903 for the Philadelphia Phillies, Cleveland Infants and Washington Senators. He was known as one of the game's early power hitters, and while primarily a left fielder during his career, he also played as an infielder. Delahanty won a batting title, batted over .400 three times, and has the fifth-highest batting average in MLB history. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1945. He died falling into Niagara Falls or the Niagara River after being removed from a train while intoxicated. His biographer argues that:

The Temple Cup was a cup awarded to the winner of a best-of-seven, post-season play-offs championship tournament for American professional baseball for the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs and awarded four times from 1894 to 1897. The 30-inch-high silver cup cost $800, and was donated by coal, citrus, and lumber baron William Chase Temple (1862-1917), a part-owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates at the time.

In March 1899, Burkett was assigned to the St. Louis Perfectos. He played for the Perfectos/Cardinals for three seasons. In 1901, he led the NL in batting average (.376), on-base percentage (.440), hits (226), and runs scored (142). Before the 1902 season, Burkett jumped to the St. Louis Browns of the American League. He played for the Browns for three seasons and then finished his major league career with the Boston Americans in 1905. [1]

St. Louis Cardinals Major League Baseball team in St. Louis, Missouri, United States

The St. Louis Cardinals are an American professional baseball team based in St. Louis, Missouri. The Cardinals compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. Busch Stadium has been their home ballpark since 2006. One of the most successful franchises in baseball history, the Cardinals have won 11 World Series championships, the second-most in Major League Baseball and the most in the National League. Their 19 National League pennants rank third in NL history. In addition, St. Louis has won 13 division titles in the East and Central divisions.

On-base percentage

In baseball statistics, on-base percentage is a statistic generally measuring how frequently a batter reaches base. Specifically, it records the ratio of the batter's times-on-base (TOB) to their number of at bats. It first became an official MLB statistic in 1984.

American League Baseball league, part of Major League Baseball

The American League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or simply the American League (AL), is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States and Canada. It developed from the Western League, a minor league based in the Great Lakes states, which eventually aspired to major league status. It is sometimes called the Junior Circuit because it claimed Major League status for the 1901 season, 25 years after the formation of the National League.

Burkett holds the record for the most inside-the-park home runs in MLB history, with 55. [4] He has the highest batting average (.378) and on-base percentage (.444) in St. Louis Cardinals history. [5]

In baseball, an inside-the-park home run is a play where a batter hits a home run without hitting the ball out of the field of play. It is also known as an "in-the-park home run" or "in the park homer".

Later life

Burkett managed the New England League's Worcester Busters from 1906 to 1915 and played some games for the team, as well. [6] In 1906, he led the league with a .344 batting average. [7]

Newspapers described Burkett as retiring from baseball in 1916. He secured a position with a brass factory in Worcester in December. [8] However, he signed on as a coach with College of the Holy Cross late that month. [9] In four seasons at Holy Cross, Burkett amassed an 88-12-1 record; nine players on his 1919 team were designated All-East players. [10]

Burkett managed sporadically in the minor leagues until 1933. [6] He was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1946. [1] The Wheeling native became the first West Virginian elected into the Hall of Fame.

Burkett died in Worcester, Massachusetts, on May 27, 1953. [1]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Jesse Burkett Statistics and History". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved February 1, 2013.
  2. "Jesse Burkett: Looking 'Em Over". Ohio County Public Library. Retrieved February 22, 2014.
  3. "Burkett, Jesse". Baseball Hall of Fame . Retrieved February 22, 2014.
  4. "Inside The Park Home Run Records". baseball-almanac.com. Retrieved February 1, 2013.
  5. "St. Louis Cardinals Top 50 Career Batting Leaders" . Retrieved December 13, 2018.
  6. 1 2 "Jesse Burkett Minor League Statistics & History". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved February 1, 2013.
  7. "1906 New England League Batting Leaders". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved February 1, 2013.
  8. "Jesse Burkett now factory employee". The Day . December 8, 1916. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  9. "Jesse Burkett to pilot Holy Cross". The Day . December 23, 1916. Retrieved January 2, 2015.
  10. "2014 Holy Cross Baseball" (PDF). College of the Holy Cross . Retrieved January 2, 2015.[ permanent dead link ]
Preceded by
Hugh Duffy
Single season base hit record holders
1896–1910
Succeeded by
Ty Cobb