Jim Brough

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Jim Brough
James Wasdale Brough - Leeds.JPG
Ogden's Cigarette card featuring 'Gentleman' Jim Brough
Personal information
Full nameJames Wasdale Brough
Born(1903-11-05)5 November 1903
Silloth, Cumberland, England
Died16 September 1986(1986-09-16) (aged 82)
Workington, Cumbria, England
Playing information
Rugby union
Position Fullback
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
19??–25 Silloth RUFC [1]
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1923–25Cumberland
1925 England 20000
Rugby league
Position Fullback, Centre
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1925–1944 Leeds 4423482266
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1926–36 England 1129024
1928–36 Great Britain 5000
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
1948 Batley
≤1955≥58 Workington Town
1962 Whitehaven RLFC 0000
Total0000
Representative
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
195859 Great Britain 850363
Source: [2] [3] [4] [5]

James Wasdale Brough (5 November 1903 – 16 September 1986), also known by the nickname of 'Gentleman Jim' , was an English dual-code international rugby union, association football (soccer) footballer, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1920s and 1930s, and rugby league coach of the 1940s and 1950s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for England and Cumberland, and at club level for Silloth RUFC, [1] as a fullback, and club level association football as an amateur for Liverpool (reserve team), as a goalkeeper, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain (captain), and England, and at club level for Leeds, as a fullback, or centre, and coached representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain, and at club level for Batley and Workington Town. Born in Silloth, Cumberland, England, he died in Workington, Cumbria, England. [6]

Contents

Playing career

Rugby union

Brough was working in the fishing industry and his main interest was sailing model yachts until, aged 17, he joined some other young men in forming a rugby union club. This short-lived club, set up by friends who could not get a game with Silloth RUFC, gave him an interest in the sport and he soon found himself playing for the Silloth club itself. By the age of 19, he was playing rugby union for the county team of Cumberland, and by age 21 he had played for England (RU). [7] His Test début was in January 1925 against New Zealand at Twickenham Stadium, South London. Two weeks later, he appeared against Wales. [7] [8]

Various rugby league sides were now taking note of Brough's ability, including Barrow, Huddersfield, Hull FC, Swinton and Warrington. Despite being offered as much as £350 to join the league ranks, Brough chose instead to sign with association football club Liverpool as an amateur association footballer. He then discovered that he was unlikely to supplant Liverpool's incumbent goalkeeper, Elisha Scott, and when rugby league club Leeds offered him a signing-on fee in excess of £600, he joined the ranks of professional rugby league footballers. [7]

Rugby league

Brough made his rugby league début for Leeds against York at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Wednesday 2 September 1925. [9]

Brough played fullback in Leeds' 11–8 victory over Swinton in the 1931–32 Challenge Cup Final at Central Park, Wigan, on Saturday 7 May 1932, in front of a crowd of 29,000, then was captain in the 18–2 victory over Huddersfield in the 1935–36 Challenge Cup Final at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 18 April 1936, in front of a crowd of 51,250, he missed the 19–2 victory over Halifax in the 1940–41 Challenge Cup Final at Odsal Stadium, Bradford, and played fullback in the 15–10 victory over Halifax in the 1941–42 Challenge Cup Final at Odsal Stadium, Bradford, on Saturday 6 June 1942. [10]

International honours

As a professional rugby league footballer, Brough won caps for England in 1926 against Wales, and Other Nationalities, in 1928 against Wales, in 1929 against Other Nationalities, in 1932 against Wales, in 1933 against Other Nationalities, in 1934 against Australia, in 1935 against France, and Wales, in 1936 against Wales, and France, [4] and won caps for Great Britain while at Leeds in 1928 against Australia (2 matches), and New Zealand (2 matches), and in 1936 against Australia (captain). [5]

Coaching career

Brough was the coach of Batley from January 1948 to May 1948, [11] and was the coach in Workington Town's 12–21 defeat by Barrow in the 1954–55 Challenge Cup Final at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 30 April 1955, and was the coach in the 9–13 defeat by Wigan in the 1957–58 Challenge Cup Final at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 10 May 1958, in front of a crowd of 66,109. [12]

Aside from his club roles, Brough was also coach of the Great Britain rugby league team.

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Bill Fallowfield
1956-1957
Coach
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
Great Britain

1958-1959
Succeeded by
Bill Fallowfield
1960
Preceded by
Eppie Gibson
1957-1962
Coach
Haven colours.svg
Whitehaven RLFC

1962
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Gus Risman
1946-1954
Coach
Workingtoncolours.svg
Workington Town

1955-1958
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Mick Exley
1947-1948
Coach
Batley colours.svg
Batley

1948
Succeeded by
Bill Smith
1948-1949

Honoured at Silloth RUFC

In 2005 in honour of Jim Brough, Silloth RUFC renamed its ground, The Jim Brough Rugby Park. [13]

Personal life

Jim Brough married Florance Annie (née Carr) in 1928 in Wigton. They had two children, the golfers Samuel John Brough (1931 - 2014), and Florance Poinsettia Pamela Brough (1936 - 2017); the organist and composer Michael James Arman Brough (b.1960) is Jim Brough's grandson.

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References

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  2. "Statistics at en.espn.co.uk". espn.co.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  3. "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  4. 1 2 "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2011. Archived from the original on 3 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  5. 1 2 "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2011. Archived from the original on 2 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  6. "Profile at leedsrugby.dnsupdate.co.uk". leedsrugby.dnsupdate.co.uk. 31 December 2011. Archived from the original on 17 November 2008. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  7. 1 2 3 "With The R.L. Touring Team In Australia". Yorkshire Evening Post. 20 March 1936. p. 12.
  8. Birley, Derek (1996). Playing the game: sport and British society, 1910–45. Manchester University Press ND. p. 173. ISBN   978-0-7190-4497-7.
  9. Dalby, Ken (1955). The Headingley Story – 1890–1955 – Volume One – Rugby. The Leeds Cricket, Football & Athletic Co. Ltd ASIN: B0018JNGVM
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  11. 2 January 1948. Mick Exley Leaves Batley. Yorkshire Evening Post. ISBN n/a
  12. "1957–1958 Challenge Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2013.
  13. "Location". sillothtigers. 31 December 2012. Archived from the original on 10 April 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2013.