Jim Carlen

Last updated
Jim Carlen
Jim Carlen.png
Carlen in 1962 with Georgia Tech
Biographical details
Born(1933-07-11)July 11, 1933
Cookeville, Tennessee
DiedJuly 22, 2012(2012-07-22) (aged 79)
Hilton Head Island, South Carolina
Playing career
1953–1954 Georgia Tech
Position(s) Linebacker, punter
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1958–1960 Georgia Tech (freshmen)
1961–1965 Georgia Tech (defense)
1966–1969 West Virginia
1970–1974 Texas Tech
1975–1981 South Carolina
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1975–1981 South Carolina
Head coaching record
Overall107–69–6
Bowls2–5–1
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 SoCon (1967)
Awards
SWC Coach of the Year (1970, 1973)

James Andrew Carlen III (July 11, 1933 – July 22, 2012) was an American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at West Virginia University (1966–1969) and Texas Tech University (1970–1974). He served as both the head football coach and athletic director of the University of South Carolina (1975–1981). Carlen compiled an overall career college football record of 107–69–6.

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

West Virginia University public university in Morgantown, West Virginia, United States

West Virginia University (WVU) is a public, land-grant, space-grant, research-intensive university in Morgantown, West Virginia, United States. Its other campuses include the West Virginia University Institute of Technology in Beckley and Potomac State College of West Virginia University in Keyser; and a second clinical campus for the University's medical and dental schools at Charleston Area Medical Center in Charleston. WVU Extension Service provides outreach with offices in all of West Virginia's 55 counties. Since 2001, WVU has been governed by the West Virginia University Board of Governors.

Texas Tech University Public research university in Lubbock, Texas, United States

Texas Tech University, often referred to as Texas Tech, Tech, or TTU, is a public research university in Lubbock, Texas. Established on February 10, 1923, and called until 1969 Texas Technological College, it is the main institution of the four-institution Texas Tech University System. The university's student enrollment is the seventh-largest in Texas as of the Fall 2017 semester.

Contents

Coaching career

Carlen coached the West Virginia Mountaineers from 1966 to 1969 with a record of 25–13–3 (.658). Then he coached the Texas Tech Red Raiders from 1970 to 1974, where he amassed a 37–20–2 record. From 1975 to 1981, he was the head football coach of the South Carolina Gamecocks where he coached Heisman Trophy running back George Rogers and compiled a 45–36–1 record. Carlen 45 wins are third most in the program's history after Steve Spurrier's 85 and Rex Enright's 64. In 1979 and 1980, Carlen led the Gamecocks to consecutive 8–4 campaigns with appearancess in the Hall of Fame Classic and Gator Bowl. His career bowl game record is 2–5–1.

West Virginia Mountaineers football American college football team

The West Virginia Mountaineers football team represents West Virginia University in the NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of college football. West Virginia plays its home games on Mountaineer Field at Milan Puskar Stadium on the campus of West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia. The Mountaineers compete in the Big 12 Conference.

Texas Tech Red Raiders football

The Texas Tech Red Raiders football program is a college football team that represents Texas Tech University. The team competes, as a member of the Big 12 Conference, which is a Division I Football Bowl Subdivision of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The program began in 1925 and has an overall winning record, including a total of 11 conference titles and one division title. On November 30, 2018, Matt Wells was hired as the team's 16th head football coach after former Red Raiders quarterback Kliff Kingsbury was terminated upon conclusion of the 2018 season. Home games are played at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas.

South Carolina Gamecocks football football team of the University of South Carolina

The South Carolina Gamecocks football program represents the University of South Carolina in the sport of American football. The Gamecocks compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Eastern Division of the Southeastern Conference. Will Muschamp currently serves as the team's head coach. They play their home games at Williams-Brice Stadium. Currently, it is the 20th largest stadium in college football.

In July 2008, four years before his death, Carlen was inducted into the Texas Tech Athletics Hall of Honor. [1]

Coach Carlen was actively involved in the Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA) during his entire post-coaching life. In April 2011 he was quoted as saying, “I was one of the original six members of the FCA, the originals. FCA started very small, and then it snowballed. When I hired a coach I always took a close look at his spiritual life,” Carlen said. “When you have God on your side you don’t have to worry.” [2]

Death

Carlen died on July 22, 2012, at the age of seventy-nine at a nursing home near his home at Hilton Head Island in Beaufort County in southeastern South Carolina. [3] A memorial service was scheduled for Friday, July 27, at 4 p.m. at the Trenholm Road United Methodist Church in Columbia, South Carolina. [4]

Hilton Head Island, South Carolina Town in South Carolina, United States

Hilton Head Island, sometimes referred to as simply Hilton Head, is a Lowcountry resort town and barrier island in Beaufort County, South Carolina, United States. It is 20 miles (32 km) northeast of Savannah, Georgia, and 95 miles (153 km) southwest of Charleston. The island is named after Captain William Hilton, who in 1663 identified a headland near the entrance to Port Royal Sound, which mapmakers named "Hilton's Headland." The island features 12 miles (19 km) of beachfront on the Atlantic Ocean and is a popular vacation destination. In 2004, an estimated 2.25 million visitors pumped more than $1.5 billion into the local economy. The year-round population was 37,099 at the 2010 census, although during the peak of summer vacation season the population can swell to 150,000. Over the past decade, the island's population growth rate was 32%. Hilton Head Island is a primary city within the Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort metropolitan area, which had an estimated population of 207,413 in 2015.

Beaufort County, South Carolina County in the United States

Beaufort County is a county in the U.S. state of South Carolina. As of the 2010 census, its population was 162,233. Its county seat is Beaufort.

Columbia, South Carolina Capital of South Carolina

Columbia is the capital and second largest city of the U.S. state of South Carolina, with a population estimate of 134,309 as of 2016. The city serves as the county seat of Richland County, and a portion of the city extends into neighboring Lexington County. It is the center of the Columbia metropolitan statistical area, which had a population of 767,598 as of the 2010 United States Census, growing to 832,666 by July 1, 2018, according to 2018 U.S. Census estimates. This makes it the 70th largest metropolitan statistical areas in the nation, as estimated by the United States Census Bureau as of July 1, 2018. The name Columbia is a poetic term used for the United States, originating from the name of Christopher Columbus.

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffsCoaches#AP°
West Virginia Mountaineers (Southern Conference)(1966–1967)
1966 West Virginia 3–5–23–02nd
1967 West Virginia 5–4–13–0–11st
West Virginia Mountaineers (NCAA University Division Independent)(1966–1969)
1968 West Virginia 7–3
1969 West Virginia 10–1W Peach 1817
West Virginia:25–13–36–0–1
Texas Tech Red Raiders (Southwest Conference)(1970–1974)
1970 Texas Tech 8–45–23rdL Sun
1971 Texas Tech 4–72–57th
1972 Texas Tech 8–44–3T–2ndL Sun
1973 Texas Tech 11–16–12ndW Gator 1111
1974 Texas Tech 6–4–23–46thT Peach
Texas Tech:37–20–220–15
South Carolina Gamecocks (NCAA Division I / I-A independent)(1975–1981)
1975 South Carolina 7–5L Tangerine
1976 South Carolina 6–5
1977 South Carolina 5–7
1978 South Carolina 5–5–1
1979 South Carolina 8–4L Hall of Fame Classic
1980 South Carolina 8–4L Gator
1981 South Carolina 6–6
South Carolina:45–36–1
Total:107–69–6
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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References

  1. Tech Hall of Fame, Hall of Honor announces seven new inductees [ permanent dead link ]
  2. Coach Jim Carlen: College Football Hall of Fame Nominee for 2011
  3. Former USC Head Coach Jim Carlen Dies [ permanent dead link ]
  4. "George Watson, "Former Texas Tech football coach Jim Carlen dies at age 79:Jim Carlen wasn't at Texas Tech long, but the impact he had resonates today"". Lubbock Avalanche-Journal . Retrieved July 23, 2012.