Jim Challinor

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Jim Challinor
Jim Challinor - Warrington.jpeg
Personal information
Full nameJames Pevitt Challinor
Born(1934-08-02)2 August 1934
Warrington, England
Died18 December 1976(1976-12-18) (aged 42)
Warrington, England
Playing information
Height6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight13 st 5 lb (85 kg; 187 lb)
Rugby league
Position Wing, Centre
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1952–63 Warrington 28213520409
1963–67 Barrow 119+2202064
1967–68 Liverpool City 221003
Total42515640476
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1958–60 Great Britain 31003
1956 [1] England Services 11003
1959–60 [2] Lancashire 20000
Rugby union
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
≥1967 Altrincham Kersal ≥1
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
circa-1955 RAF Rugby Union ≥1
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
196367 Barrow
196768 Liverpool City
197074 St. Helens
197476 [3] Oldham
Total0000
Representative
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
195859 Great Britain 850363
197274 Great Britain 17111565
Source: [4] [5]

James Pevitt Challinor (2 August 1934 – 18 December 1976) was an English rugby union and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s, and coached rugby league in the 1960s and 1970s. A Great Britain international representative three-quarter back, he played club level rugby league (RL) for Warrington (with whom he won the 1954 Challenge Cup), and Barrow (who he also captained). [4] Challinor later coached Great Britain as well as Barrow, Liverpool City and St. Helens. [5] Challinor is a Warrington Wolves Hall of Fame inductee, [6] only two men have played in, and coached Rugby League World Cup winning Great Britain sides, they are; Eric Ashton, and Jim Challinor. [7]

Contents

Biography

Challinor was born in Warrington, Lancashire, [8] and he died aged 42 in his home town of Warrington, Cheshire, England. [9]

Playing career

Challinor had been offered a trial at Manchester United, but made his début aged-18 for Warrington against St. Helens in October 1952, he initially played on the wing, but later moved into the centres. Challinor played right-centre, i.e. number 3, and scored the first try in Warrington's 8–4 victory over Halifax in the 1953–54 Challenge Cup Final replay during the 1953–54 season at Odsal Stadium, Bradford on Wednesday 5 May 1954, in front of a record crowd of 102,575 or more. [10] Challinor played in Warrington's 8–7 victory over Halifax the Championship Final during the 1953–54 season at Maine Road, Manchester on Saturday 8 May 1954, in front of a crowd of 36,519, played in the 7–3 victory over Oldham the Championship Final during the 1954–55 season at Maine Road, Manchester on Saturday 14 May 1955.

Jim Challinor's marriage to Wendy (née Stringer) (birth registered during fourth ¼ 1935 in Warrington district) was registered during fourth ¼ 1956 in Newton district. [11] They would go on to have children; Neil Challinor (birth registered during second ¼ 1957 (age 6364) in Newton district), Yvonne Challinor (birth registered during second ¼ 1960 (age 6061) in Runcorn district), and Nadine Challinor (birth registered during third ¼ 1964 (age 5657) in Barrow-in-Furness district). During his period of national service he served with the Royal Air Force (RAF), and was based at RAF Padgate in Warrington. He also played representative level rugby union for the Royal Air Force.

Challinor won caps for Great Britain while at Warrington on the 1958 Great Britain Lions tour against Australia and New Zealand. He also played for the Lions in the 1960 Rugby League World Cup against France, helping Great Britain to victory. Challinor played in the 5–4 victory over St. Helens in the 1959–60 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1959–60 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 31 October 1959, in front of a crowd of 39,237. Challinor played in the 10–25 defeat by victory over Leeds the Championship Final during the 1960–61 season at Odsal Stadium, Bradford on Saturday 20 May 1961. He made 282 appearance for Warrington, scoring 135 tries, kicking 2 goals for 409 points. [12]

In 1963 Challinor moved to Barrow. He played right-centre, i.e. number 3, and was captain-coach in Barrow's 12–17 defeat by Featherstone Rovers in the 1966–67 Challenge Cup Final during the 1966–67 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 13 May 1967. [13]

Jim Challinor opened Challinor Sports at 146 Padgate Lane, Warrington in 1967.

Coaching career

After retiring from the playing field Challinor took up coaching. He joined St. Helens, and coached them in the 5–9 defeat by Leeds in the 1970 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Tuesday 15 December 1970, in front of a crowd of 7,612.

Challinor coached St Helens to the 16–12 victory over Wigan in the 1970–71 season's Championship Final at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 22 May 1971. He also coached them to the 8–2 victory over Rochdale Hornets the 1971 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final during the 1971–72 season at Knowsley Road, St. Helens on Tuesday 14 December 1971, in front of a crowd of 9,255, the 16–13 victory over Leeds in the 1971–72 Challenge Cup Final during the 1971–72 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 13 May 1972, in front of a crowd of 89,495, the 5–9 defeat by Leeds the Championship Final during the 1971–72 season at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 20 May 1972.

Challinor coached Great Britain to victory in the 1972 Rugby League World Cup in France. During the 1973 Kangaroo tour he coached Great Britain to an 11–7 victory over Australia at Knowsley Road, St. Helens on Tuesday 13 November 1973. [7] Challinor was also coach on the 1974 Great Britain Lions tour, due to an injury crisis he came out of retirement on the New Zealand leg, he scored a try in the 33–2 victory over South Island rugby league team at Greymouth on Tuesday 6 August 1974, however he picked up an injury that resulted in him having a kidney removed.

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Bill Fallowfield
1956-1957
Coach
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
Great Britain

1958-1959
Succeeded by
Bill Fallowfield
1960
Preceded by
Cliff Evans
1967-1970
Coach
Saintscolours.svg
St Helens R.F.C.

1970-1974
Succeeded by
Eric Ashton
1974-1980
Preceded by
Johnny Whiteley
1970
Coach
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
Great Britain

1972-1974
Succeeded by
David Watkins
1977

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References

  1. History of Rugby League Volume 61 1955-56 page 23 edited by Irvin saxton
  2. History of Rugby League Volume 65 1959-60 page 12 edited by Irvin Saxton
  3. Rothmans RL Yearbook 1999 by Raymond Fletcher page 94 ISBN   0747275726
  4. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  5. 1 2 "Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  6. "Hall of Fame at Wire2Wolves.com (archived)". wire2wolves.com. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 18 July 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  7. 1 2 "HALL OF HEROES: Warrington Wolves' Jim Challinor, World Cup winning pläyer and coäch". warringtonguardian.co.uk. 31 December 2015. Retrieved 1 January 2016.
  8. "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2015. Retrieved 1 January 2016.
  9. "Death details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2015. Retrieved 1 January 2016.
  10. "Mud, blood and memories of the day when 102,575 made history at Odsal". The Independent. 31 December 2016. Retrieved 1 January 2017.
  11. "Marriage details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2015. Retrieved 1 January 2016.
  12. "Warrington Wolves Hall of Fame – Jim Challinor: 1952–1963". Warrington Wolves. Archived from the original on 5 December 2008. Retrieved 24 September 2008.
  13. Hughes, Ed (31 October 2004). "Caught in Time: Great Britain prepare for 1972 rugby league World Cup final". The Sunday Times . UK. Retrieved 18 October 2010.