Jim Ellis (computing)

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James Tice Ellis (May 6, 1956[ citation needed ] June 28, 2001) was an American computer scientist best known as the co-creator of Usenet, along with Tom Truscott.

A computer scientist is a person who has acquired the knowledge of computer science, the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their application.

Usenet worldwide distributed Internet discussion system

Usenet is a worldwide distributed discussion system available on computers. It was developed from the general-purpose Unix-to-Unix Copy (UUCP) dial-up network architecture. Tom Truscott and Jim Ellis conceived the idea in 1979, and it was established in 1980. Users read and post messages to one or more categories, known as newsgroups. Usenet resembles a bulletin board system (BBS) in many respects and is the precursor to Internet forums that are widely used today. Discussions are threaded, as with web forums and BBSs, though posts are stored on the server sequentially. The name comes from the term "users network".

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Born in Nashville, Tennessee, Ellis grew up in Orlando, Florida. Before developing Usenet, Ellis attended Duke University. He later worked as an Internet security consultant for Sun Microsystems. He was also Manager of Technical Development at CERT. He came up with the word Usenet.

Nashville, Tennessee State capital and consolidated city-county in Tennessee, United States

Nashville is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state of Tennessee. The city is the county seat of Davidson County and is located on the Cumberland River. The city's population ranks 24th in the U.S. According to 2017 estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau, the total consolidated city-county population stood at 691,243. The "balance" population, which excludes semi-independent municipalities within Davidson County, was 667,560 in 2017.

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Duke University private university in Durham, North Carolina, United States

Duke University is a private research university in Durham, North Carolina. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. In 1924, tobacco and electric power industrialist James Buchanan Duke established The Duke Endowment and the institution changed its name to honor his deceased father, Washington Duke.

Ellis and Truscott were awarded the 1995 Usenix Life Time Achievement Award.

Personal life and death

Ellis and his wife, Carolyn, had two children.

He died of non-Hodgkin lymphoma [1] , a form of blood cancer, at his home in Harmony, Pennsylvania on June 28, 2001. He was 45. [2]

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma cancer of lymph in humans

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Harmony, Pennsylvania Borough in Pennsylvania, United States

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References

  1. https://www.wired.com/2001/06/usenet-pioneer-jim-ellis-dies/
  2. http://old.post-gazette.com/obituaries/20010629ellis0629p2.asp
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