Jim Hickey (American football)

Last updated
Jim Hickey
Jim Hickey.png
Hickey pictured in Yackety Yack 1967, North Carolina yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1920-01-22)January 22, 1920
Pennsylvania
DiedDecember 27, 1997(1997-12-27) (aged 77)
Southern Pines, North Carolina
Playing career
Football
1938–1941 William & Mary
Basketball
1940, 1942 William & Mary
Position(s) Wingback, tailback (football)
Guard (basketball)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1951–1955 Hampden–Sydney
1956–1958 North Carolina (assistant)
1959–1966 North Carolina
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1951–1955 Hampden–Sydney
1966–1969 Connecticut
Head coaching record
Overall63–56–4
Bowls1–0
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 Mason-Dixon (1955)
1 ACC (1963)
Awards
ACC Coach of the Year (1963)

James Benton Hickey (January 22, 1920 – December 27, 1997) was an American football and basketball player, coach of football, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Hampden–Sydney College from 1951 to 1955 and at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1959 to 1966, compiling a career college football record of 63–56–4. Hickey was the athletic director at the University of Connecticut from 1966 to 1969.

Contents

Education and career

Hickey graduated from The College of William & Mary in 1942 and played wingback and tailback on the football team and guard on the basketball team. He was inducted into the William & Mary Athletics Hall of Fame in 1971. He served as a Lieutenant (junior grade) in the United States Navy during World War II. He coached football at Hampden–Sydney College for five years before joining the staff of Jim Tatum at the University of North Carolina in 1956 as an assistant. After Tatum's death in the summer of 1959, he accepted the position of head coach. Hickey was dismissed after the 1966 season and Bill Dooley succeeded him as North Carolina's head coach.

Family

Hickey was the son of William and Cora Hickey. He married Agnes Pauline Small Pardue on November 14, 1976 in Sanford, North Carolina. Hickey is buried in Buffalo Cemetery in Sanford.

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffsCoaches#AP°
Hampden–Sydney Tigers (Mason-Dixon Conference)(1951–1955)
1951 Hampden–Sydney4–3–2
1952 Hampden–Sydney5–3–1
1953 Hampden–Sydney5–1–1
1954 Hampden–Sydney5–3
1955 Hampden–Sydney8–11st
Hampden–Sydney:27–11–4
North Carolina Tar Heels (Atlantic Coast Conference)(1959–1966)
1959 North Carolina 5–55–22nd
1960 North Carolina 3–72–5T–6th
1961 North Carolina 5–54–32nd
1962 North Carolina 3–73–4T–4th
1963 North Carolina 9–26–1T–1stW Gator 19
1964 North Carolina 5–54–3T–3rd
1965 North Carolina 4–63–3T–5th
1966 North Carolina 2–81–48th
North Carolina:36–4528–25
Total:63–56–4
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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