Jim Risch

Last updated

Jim Risch
Jim Risch official portrait.jpg
United States Senator
from Idaho
Assumed office
January 3, 2009
Servingwith Mike Crapo
Preceded by Larry Craig
Ranking Member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee
Assumed office
January 20, 2021
Preceded by Bob Menendez
Chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee
In office
January 3, 2019 January 20, 2021
Preceded by Bob Corker
Succeeded by Bob Menendez
Chair of the Senate Small Business Committee
In office
January 3, 2017 January 3, 2019
Preceded by David Vitter
Succeeded by Marco Rubio
31st Governor of Idaho
In office
May 26, 2006 January 1, 2007
Lieutenant Mark Ricks
Preceded by Dirk Kempthorne
Succeeded by Butch Otter
39th and 41st Lieutenant Governor of Idaho
In office
January 1, 2007 January 3, 2009
GovernorButch Otter
Preceded byMark Ricks
Succeeded by Brad Little
In office
January 3, 2003 May 26, 2006
GovernorDirk Kempthorne
Preceded by Jack Riggs
Succeeded byMark Ricks
36th President pro tempore of the Idaho Senate
In office
1982–1988
Preceded by Reed Budge
Succeeded byMike Crapo
Member of the Idaho Senate
from the 18th district
In office
1995–2002
Preceded byRoger Madsen
Succeeded by Sheila Sorensen
Member of the Idaho Senate
from the 21st district
In office
1974–1988
Succeeded by Mike Burkett
Prosecuting Attorney of Ada County
In office
1970–1974
Personal details
Born
James Elroy Risch

(1943-05-03) May 3, 1943 (age 77)
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S.
Political party Republican
Spouse(s)
(m. 1968)
Children3
Education University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee
University of Idaho (BS, JD)
Net worth$20.8 million (2019) [1]
Signature Jim Risch Signature.svg
Website Senate website

James Elroy Risch ( /ˈrɪʃ/ RISH; born May 3, 1943) is an American lawyer and politician who has served as the junior United States Senator from Idaho since 2009. [2] A member of the Republican Party, he served as lieutenant governor of Idaho from 2003 to 2006 and from 2007 to 2009, and as governor of Idaho from 2006 to 2007.

Contents

Prior to his career in politics, Risch was a prosecuting attorney and taught criminal law at Boise State University.

Early life

Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Risch is the son of Helen B. (née Levi) and Elroy A. Risch, a lineman for Wisconsin Bell. His father is of German descent and his mother is of Irish, Scottish, and English ancestry. [3] Risch attended the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee from 1961 to 1963 and then transferred to the University of Idaho in Moscow, where he was a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity. [4] He obtained a B.S. degree in forestry in 1965, [5] and continued his education at the university's College of Law. He served on the Law Review and the College of Law Advisory Committee [6] before receiving a J.D. degree in 1968. [7]

Risch entered politics in 1970 in Boise at age 27, winning election as Ada County Prosecuting Attorney. While serving in this capacity, he taught undergraduate classes in criminal justice at Boise State College and served as the president of the state's prosecuting attorneys' association. Concurrent with his service in the Idaho Senate, Risch became a millionaire as one of Idaho's most successful trial lawyers. [8]

State politics

Idaho Senate

Risch was first elected to the Idaho Senate from Ada County in 1974. He entered the state senate leadership in 1976, serving as majority leader and later as president pro tempore.

In a dramatic upset, Risch was defeated for reelection in 1988 by Democratic political newcomer and Boise attorney Mike Burkett. As of mid-2006, it remains Idaho's most expensive legislative contest.

In the second political defeat of his career, Risch lost the 1994 primary election for a state Senate seat to Roger Madsen. Risch returned to the state senate in 1995, as an appointee of Governor Phil Batt, who had named Madsen as the state commerce department's director.

First term as lieutenant governor

In January 2001, Risch had his eye on the lieutenant governor's seat vacated by Butch Otter, who resigned after being elected to Congress, but Governor Dirk Kempthorne appointed state Senator Jack Riggs of Coeur d'Alene to the post instead. The next year, Risch defeated Riggs in the Republican primary and won the general election, spending $360,000 of his own money on the campaign.

Governor

On May 26, 2006, Risch became governor of Idaho when Kempthorne resigned to become U.S. Secretary of the Interior. Risch appointed Mark Ricks to serve as his lieutenant governor. [9] Risch served out the remaining seven months of Kempthorne's term, which ended in January 2007.

In August 2006, Risch called a special session of the Idaho Legislature to consider his proposed property tax reform bill, the Property Tax Relief Act of 2006.

Second term as lieutenant governor

Risch was expected to enter the 2006 Republican gubernatorial primary to succeed Kempthorne, who was completing his second term at this time of his federal appointment. But Otter had already announced his candidacy for the position in December 2004 and gained a significant head start in campaigning and fundraising. In November 2005, Risch announced his intention to seek election again as lieutenant governor.

Risch was unopposed for the 2006 Republican nomination for lieutenant governor and defeated former Democratic U.S. representative Larry LaRocco in the general election. Risch's term as governor ended in January 2007 and he returned to the role of lieutenant governor. He resigned as lieutenant governor to take his seat in the Senate on January 3, 2009. Otter named state Senator Brad Little of Emmett as Risch's successor.

U.S. Senate

Elections

2008

On August 31, 2007, the Associated Press reported that Governor Otter might appoint Risch to the United States Senate to succeed the embattled Larry Craig. On September 1, the Idaho Statesman reported that Otter's spokesman denied Risch had been selected and that Otter had "made no decision and he is not leaning toward anybody." [10] On October 9, Risch announced that he would run for the Senate seat. [11] In May 2008, Risch was nominated as the Republican candidate for U.S. Senate. [12] In the general election he defeated former Democratic Congressman Larry LaRocco with 58% of the vote. [13]

2014

Risch won the Republican primary with 79.9% of the vote [14] and defeated attorney Nels Mitchell in the general election with 65.3% of the vote. [15]

2020

Risch was unopposed in the 2020 Republican primary. [16] He defeated Democratic nominee Paulette Jordan in the general election with 62% of the vote. [17]

Tenure

Risch with Ivanka Trump, Lauren Gibbs and Shauna Rohbock at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea DW2eapcV4AUNn q.jpg
Risch with Ivanka Trump, Lauren Gibbs and Shauna Rohbock at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea

2000s

Risch was one of four freshmen Republican senators in the 111th Congress of 2009, with Mike Johanns of Nebraska, George LeMieux of Florida and Scott Brown of Massachusetts. Republican Senator Mike Crapo of Idaho called Risch "results-oriented". [18]

2010s

In 2017, Risch was one of 22 senators to sign a letter [19] to President Donald Trump urging him to withdraw the United States from the Paris Agreement.

On August 11, 2017, in an interview on PBS Newshour , Risch endorsed Trump's threatening North Korea with military destruction in the event that country launched missiles at Guam. [20]

On March 22, 2018, the day before a potential federal government shutdown, Risch threatened to block a government spending bill because it included changing the name of the White Clouds Wilderness protected area to honor a deceased political rival, former Idaho Governor Cecil Andrus. [21] [22] Risch ultimately acquiesced.

In January 2019, Risch joined Marco Rubio, Cory Gardner, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in introducing legislation that would impose sanctions on the government of President of Syria Bashar al-Assad and bolster American cooperation with Israel and Jordan. [23]

2020s

On January 21, 2020, during the first day of opening arguments in Trump's Senate impeachment trial, Risch was the first senator to fall asleep. Courtroom sketch artist Art Lien memorialized his nap. [24]

In 2020, while Chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Risch decided not to press Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to testify at the annual budget hearing. Pompeo had just successfully sought to have State Department inspector general Steve Linick fired; at the time, Linick had been conducting a watchdog investigation into the Trump administration's decision to sell arms to Saudi Arabia without congressional approval. [25]

Risch was participating in the certification of the 2021 United States Electoral College count when Trump supporters stormed the United States Capitol. He called the attack "unpatriotic and un-American in the extreme" and suggested it was sparred by "deep distrust in the integrity and veracity of our elections." [26] [27]

Committee assignments

Caucuses

Foreign Policy positions

Saudi Arabia

In 2019, Risch sought to quell dissent among Republican senators over what they perceived as the Trump administration's weak response to the killing of Saudi journalist and U.S. permanent resident Jamal Khashoggi, and its refusal to send Congress a report on the administration's determination of who killed Khashoggi. He told his fellow Republican senators and Politico that the Trump administration was in compliance with the Magnitsky Act, but the administration had said that it refused to comply with the Act. [28]

Israel Anti-Boycott Act

In March 2018, Risch co-sponsored the Israel Anti-Boycott Act (s. 720), which would make it a federal crime for Americans to encourage or participate in boycotts against Israel and Israeli settlements in the West Bank if protesting actions by the Israeli government. [29] [30]

Turkey sanctions

Risch is a co-sponsor of S.1241, the Promoting American National Security and Preventing the Resurgence of ISIS Act of 2019, which is intended to punish Turkey and protect allies like the Kurds who have suffered from recent Turkish military operations in Syria, including by resettling them in the United States. [31] The measure has broad support in Congress, which is concerned about the purchase of the Russian S-400 missile system Turkey is testing. [32]

Biden-Blinken foreign policy

Responding to Antony Blinken#Foreign policy's opening statement at the confirmation hearing for Secretary of State, Risch said that it was "music to my ears." [33]

Trump-Tillerson-Pompeo-Kushner foreign policy

Political positions

Risch with Hong Kong activists who have become prominent figures in the 2019-20 Hong Kong protests HK activists at the U.S. Senate Foreign Committee.jpg
Risch with Hong Kong activists who have become prominent figures in the 2019–20 Hong Kong protests

Abortion

Risch is anti-abortion. [34] In 2013, he co-sponsored the Child Interstate Abortion Notification Act, which would have made it illegal for a minor to cross state lines for an abortion. [35]

Guns

The National Rifle Association (NRA) endorsed Risch and gave him an A+ grade for his voting record on gun issues. [36]

In 2013, along with 12 other Republican Senators, Risch threatened to filibuster any bills Democrats introduced that Republicans perceived as a threat to gun rights, including expanded background checks. In an interview with National Public Radio, he said that Americans' right to keep and bear arms includes "a right to purchase one [a gun], to sell one, to trade in one, and you really have to have a robust market if indeed you're going to have a constitutional right." He also said that additional background checks would mean that gun dealers would "have to deal with the federal bureaucracy, which is very, very difficult to deal with." [37]

In response to the Orlando nightclub shooting, Risch and Crapo said the shooting was not a reason to call for gun control legislation. [38]

In 2016, Risch voted against the Feinstein Amendment, which would have blocked the sale of guns to people on the terrorist watch list, and Democrat Chris Murphy's proposal to expand background checks for sales at gun shows and online. Risch voted for both Republican-backed bills, John Cornyn's proposal to create a 72-hour delay for anyone on the terrorist watchlist buying a gun and Charles Grassley and Ted Cruz's proposal to alert authorities if a someone on the list tries to buy a firearm. [39]

Criminal justice

Risch opposed the FIRST STEP Act, a bipartisan criminal justice reform bill. The bill passed 87–12 on December 18, 2018. [40]

Health care

Risch supports repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act (ACA), also known as Obamacare. [41] He voted against the ACA in 2010. [42]

On May 21, 2020, Risch introduced S. 3829, the Global Health Security and Diplomacy Act, but it did not receive a vote. In opening the confirmation hearings for Secretary Antony Blinken, Risch emphasized it as a legislative and foreign policy priority, given the "catastrophic failure at every level" of global health security infrastructure. The bill's supporters claim it would "improve coordination among the relevant Federal departments and agencies implementing United States foreign assistance for global health security, and more effectively enable partner countries to strengthen and sustain resilient health systems and supply chains with the resources, capacity, and personnel required to prevent, detect, mitigate, and respond to infectious disease threats before they become pandemics, and for other purposes." [43]

Electoral history

Idaho State Senate District 18 Republican Primary election, 1996
PartyCandidateVotes%+%
RepublicanJim Risch (inc.)2,29976.0%
RepublicanEmil Loya, Jr.70924.0%
Idaho State Senate District 18 election, 1996
PartyCandidateVotes%+%
RepublicanJim Risch (inc.)9,54367.5%
DemocraticDonald Baumback4,58932.5%
Idaho State Senate District 18 Republican Primary election, 1998
PartyCandidateVotes%+%
RepublicanJim Risch (inc.)2,65667.4%
RepublicanSharon Ullman1,28332.6%
Idaho State Senate District 18 election, 1998
PartyCandidateVotes%+%
RepublicanJim Risch (inc.)8,74276.0%
LibertarianDaniel Adams2,75824.0%
Idaho State Senate District 18 Republican Primary election, 2000
PartyCandidateVotes%+%
RepublicanJim Risch (inc.)3,22250.4%
RepublicanJack Noble3,17149.6%
Idaho State Senate District 18 election, 2000
PartyCandidateVotes%+%
RepublicanJim Risch (inc.)12,91780.3%
LibertarianDaniel Adams3,16519.7%
Idaho Lieutenant Governor Republican Primary election, 2002
PartyCandidateVotes%+%
RepublicanJim Risch49,60734.6%
RepublicanJack Riggs39,68927.7%
RepublicanCelia Gould22,13415.4%
RepublicanLarry Eastland22,07915.4%
RepublicanJim Pratt5,6383.9%
RepublicanDarrell Babbitt4,1612.9%
Idaho Lieutenant Governor election, 2002
PartyCandidateVotes%+%
RepublicanJim Risch226,01756.2%
DemocraticBruce Perry160,43839.9%
LibertarianMichael Kempf15,5623.9%
Idaho Lieutenant Governor election, 2006
PartyCandidateVotes%+%
RepublicanJim Risch (inc.)259,64858.3%
DemocraticLarry LaRocco175,31239.4%
ConstitutionWilliam Charles Wellisch10,4602.4%
U.S. Senate Republican Primary election in Idaho, 2008
PartyCandidateVotes%+%
RepublicanJim Risch80,74365.3%
RepublicanScott Syme16,66013.5%
RepublicanRichard Phenneger6,5325.3%
RepublicanNeal Thompson5,3754.3%
RepublicanFred Adams4,9874.0%
RepublicanBill Hunter4,2803.5%
RepublicanBrian Hefner2,9152.4%
RepublicanHal James Styles, Jr.2,0821.7%
U.S. Senate election in Idaho, 2008
PartyCandidateVotes%+%
RepublicanJim Risch371,74457.7%
DemocraticLarry LaRocco219,90334.1%
IndependentRex Rammell34,5105.4%
LibertarianKent Marmon9,9581.5%
IndependentPro-Life8,6621.3%
U.S. Senate Republican Primary election in Idaho, 2014
PartyCandidateVotes%+%
RepublicanJim Risch (inc.)119,20979.9%
RepublicanJeremy "T" Anderson29,93920.1%
U.S. Senate election in Idaho, 2014
PartyCandidateVotes%+%
RepublicanJim Risch (inc.)285,59665.3%
DemocraticNels Mitchell151,57434.7%
U.S. Senate election in Idaho, 2020
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanJim Risch (inc.)537,44562.6%
DemocratPaulette Jordan285,86433.3%

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George Richard Bevan is the Chief Judge of the Idaho Supreme Court. He previously served as an Idaho district court judge from 2003 to 2017.

References

  1. "Ranking the Net Worth of the 115th" . Retrieved August 5, 2019.
  2. "2008 statewide totals". Archived from the original on February 20, 2015.
  3. "risch". Archived from the original on July 4, 2015. Retrieved December 26, 2015.
  4. "Phi Delta Theta". Gem of the Mountains, University of Idaho yearbook. 1965. p. 359.
  5. "College of Forestry, '65 graduates". Gem of the Mountains, University of Idaho yearbook. 1965. p. 63.
  6. "Jim Risch Biography". Jim Risch Senate. Retrieved November 18, 2014.
  7. "College of Law". Gem of the Mountains, University of Idaho yearbook. 1968. p. 36.
  8. Russell, Betsy Z. (September 17, 2009). "Risch among the richest". The Spokesman-Review . Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  9. Miller, John (June 16, 2006). "Governor names Ricks to lieutenant post". The Spokesman-Review .
  10. Hahn, Gregory (September 1, 2007). "Risch rumors about replacing Sen. Craig are 'dead wrong'". Idaho Statesman . Retrieved September 1, 2007.
  11. Greene, Tom (October 9, 2007). "Jim Risch announces Senate bid". Coeur d'Alene Press. Archived from the original on February 4, 2019. Retrieved October 10, 2009.
  12. "2008 Primary Results statewide". sos.idaho.gov. Retrieved April 12, 2017.
  13. "2008 General Results statewide". sos.idaho.gov. Retrieved April 12, 2017.
  14. "Statewide Totals". sos.idaho.gov. Retrieved April 12, 2017.
  15. "Statewide Totals". sos.idaho.gov. Retrieved April 12, 2017.
  16. "United States Senate election in Idaho, 2020". Ballotpedia. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  17. "Idaho U.S. Senate Election Results". The New York Times. November 3, 2020. ISSN   0362-4331 . Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  18. Catalini, Michael (February 10, 2014). "Idaho Sen. Jim Risch: High energy, low visibility". Idaho Statesman. Retrieved November 7, 2014.
  19. Inhofe, James. "Senator" . Retrieved June 7, 2017.
  20. "WATCH: North Korea 'will regret it fast' if it acts against U.S. allies, Trump says". PBS . August 11, 2017.
  21. Mattingly, Phil (March 23, 2018). "Idaho senator holds up bill over political rivalry with deceased governor". CNN . Retrieved September 18, 2020.
  22. DeBonis, Mike (March 23, 2018). "Sen. James Risch's decades-old grudge briefly derailed the big spending bill". The Washington Post . Retrieved September 18, 2020.
  23. Carney, Jordain (April 1, 2019). "Senate poised to rebut Trump on Syria". The Hill . Retrieved September 18, 2020.
  24. Mazza, Ed (January 22, 2020). "Caught Snoozing? Impeachment Sketch Artist Shows Sen. Jim Risch Zonked Out During Trial". HuffPost . Retrieved January 22, 2020.
  25. Woodruff Swan, Betsy; Desiderio, Andrew (June 7, 2020). "Top aide: Senate chairman drops effort to secure Pompeo testimony". Politico . Retrieved July 14, 2020.
  26. Kauffman, Gretel (January 8, 2021). "'Unpatriotic and un-American': Idaho officials react to storming of U.S. Capitol". Idaho Mountain Express Newspaper. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  27. "Idaho and Wyoming politicians respond to Capitol riots". Local News 8. January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  28. Desiderio, Andrew (February 22, 2019). "Jim Risch tries to calm Republicans furious with Trump". Politico . Retrieved February 22, 2019.
  29. "Cosponsors - S.720 - 115th Congress (2017-2018): Israel Anti-Boycott Act". www.congress.gov. March 23, 2017.
  30. Levitz, Eric (July 19, 2017). "43 Senators Want to Make It a Federal Crime to Boycott Israeli Settlements". Intelligencer .
  31. Horowitz, Daniel (December 6, 2019). "Idaho REPUBLICAN senator pushing bill to 'prioritize' more unvetted Syrian & Iraqi refugees". The Blaze. Retrieved September 18, 2020.
  32. Mattingly, Phil (December 5, 2019). "Powerful Senate chairman moves toward sanctions crackdown on Turkey as talks over weapons purchase falter". WRAL.com. Retrieved September 18, 2020.
  33. "Senate Foreign Relations Committee 1/19/2021 Antony Blinken nomination hearing for US Secretary of State".
  34. "Aspiring Pol Changes Name To Pro-Life". CBS News . Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  35. Cox, Ramsey (February 15, 2013). "GOP bill would tighten rules on parental consent for abortion". The Hill . Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  36. "NRA Endorses Jim Risch for U.S. Senate in Idaho". NRA-PVF. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  37. Cornish, Audie (April 9, 2013). "Republican Senators Pledge To Filibuster Gun Control Bill". National Public Radio . Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  38. Cowan, Richard (June 20, 2016). "Senate rejects gun-control measures after Orlando shooting". Reuters . Retrieved November 7, 2020.
  39. "Risch, Crapo favored two of four gun bills that failed Monday". Idaho Statesman . June 21, 2016. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  40. Levin, Marianne (December 18, 2018). "Senate approves Trump-backed criminal justice overhaul". Politico . Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  41. Gerber, Drew (July 24, 2017). "Washington and Idaho senators split along party lines ahead of health care vote". The Spokesman Review . Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  42. Russell, Betsy Z. (July 24, 2017). "With Senate vote looming, Crapo, Risch say they want to repeal, replace Obamacare". The Spokesman-Review . Retrieved February 22, 2019.
  43. "S. 3829 (116th): Global Health Security and Diplomacy Act of 2020".
Elections
Political offices
Preceded by
Jack Riggs
Lieutenant Governor of Idaho
2003–2006
Succeeded by
Mark Ricks
Preceded by
Dirk Kempthorne
Governor of Idaho
2006–2007
Succeeded by
Butch Otter
Preceded by
Mark Ricks
Lieutenant Governor of Idaho
2007–2009
Succeeded by
Brad Little
Party political offices
Preceded by
Larry Craig
Republican nominee for U.S. Senator from Idaho
(Class 2)

2008, 2014, 2020
Most recent
U.S. Senate
Preceded by
Larry Craig
U.S. Senator (Class 2) from Idaho
2009–present
Served alongside: Mike Crapo
Incumbent
Preceded by
Olympia Snowe
Ranking Member of the Senate Small Business Committee
2013–2015
Succeeded by
Jeanne Shaheen
Preceded by
David Vitter
Chair of the Senate Small Business Committee
2017–2019
Succeeded by
Marco Rubio
Preceded by
Bob Corker
Chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee
2019–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Mark Warner
United States Senators by seniority
34th
Succeeded by
Jeff Merkley