Jim Tyrer

Last updated

Jim Tyrer
No. 77, 71
Position: Offensive tackle
Personal information
Born:(1939-02-25)February 25, 1939
Newark, Ohio
Died:September 15, 1980(1980-09-15) (aged 41)
Kansas City, Missouri
Height:6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Weight:280 lb (127 kg)
Career information
High school: Newark (OH)
College: Ohio State
NFL Draft: 1961  / Round: 14 / Pick: 188
(by the Chicago Bears) [1]
AFL draft: 1961  / Round: 3 / Pick: 22
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:194
Games started:55
Player stats at NFL.com  ·  PFR

James Efflo Tyrer (February 25, 1939 – September 15, 1980) was an American professional football player who was an offensive tackle in the American Football League (AFL) for the Dallas Texans/Kansas City Chiefs. He also played in the National Football League (NFL) for the Chiefs and the Washington Redskins.

Contents

College career

Born and raised in Newark, Ohio, Tyrer played college football at nearby Ohio State University under head coach Woody Hayes, and earned All-America honors.

Professional career

Tyrer signed with the American Football League's Dallas Texans in 1961. He played 13 years with that franchise (180 consecutive games), which became the Kansas City Chiefs in 1963, helping set the standard for his position at left offensive tackle. His 14th and final season was with the Washington Redskins under head coach George Allen, who preferred veteran players. Tyrer was traded from the Chiefs in late August 1974 for three draft picks. [2]

Tyrer was named AFL Offensive Lineman of the Year in 1969. He and Ed Budde at guard made a powerful left side. In Super Bowl IV, Tyrer and Budde opened holes for Chiefs running backs against the Minnesota Vikings' opposing defensive linemen Jim Marshall and Alan Page, respectively, gaining 151 yards on 42 carries (3.6 yards per attempt) and 122 net passing yards in the team's upset 23–7 victory.

Tyrer was an anchor of Texans/Chiefs' line and was selected as The Sporting News'' AFL All-League tackle eight consecutive years, from 1962 through 1969. He was an AFL Western Division All-Star seven times, in 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1968 and 1969 before also capturing a pair of All-AFC accolades in 1970–71. His efforts in the upstart league would result in his selection to the American Football League All-Time Team.

At the retirement press conference for former Chief linemate Dave Hill in Kansas City in June 1975, Tyrer also announced his retirement. [3]

Family

Tyrer's sons, Brad and Jason, went on to college football careers in the Big Eight Conference. Brad played for Nebraska under head coach Tom Osborne from 1983–1988, starting his junior and senior seasons. Tyrer and the Blackshirts defense led Nebraska to a win over LSU in the 1987 Sugar Bowl, a close loss to Florida State in the 1988 Fiesta Bowl, and a Big Eight title in 1988 and an appearance in the 1989 Orange Bowl. Jason was a defensive end for Kansas under head coach Glen Mason from 1988 to 1992.

After football

Remaining in the Kansas City area following his retirement, Tyrer turned down an opportunity to serve as a scout for the Chiefs. He then spent the next three years as a salesman before tiring of the constant travel and investing in a tire business. However, a mild winter proved to be financially disastrous for Tyrer, who moved on to work for Amway.

Death

This series of business misfortunes culminated in the early hours of September 15, 1980, when Tyrer, a father of four, shot and killed his wife Martha, then committed suicide by turning the gun on himself. [4] [5] [6] The day before, he had attended a Chiefs game at Arrowhead Stadium with his ten-year-old son Jason. [7]

See also

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References

  1. "1961 Chicago Bears". databaseFootball.com. Archived from the original on April 10, 2007. Retrieved July 15, 2020.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  2. "Redskins get Tyrer". Free Lance-Star. Fredericksburg, Virginia. August 29, 1974. p. 29.
  3. "Hill, Tyrer end pro grid careers". Lawrence Journal-World. Kansas. Associated Press. June 14, 1975. p. 10.
  4. "Former all-pro Tyrer kills wife, then self". Toledo Blade. Ohio. Associated Press. September 16, 1980. p. 23.
  5. "Never Forget!". Sporting News. July 20, 2008. Archived from the original on August 30, 2008. Retrieved April 21, 2009.
  6. "Tyrer death KC shocker". Lawrence Journal-World. Associated Press. September 16, 1980. p. 9.
  7. Anderson, Dave (September 19, 1980). "Athletes' pride can be painful after sport". Lawrence Journal-World. Kansas. (New York Times news service). p. 15.