Jim Young (American football coach)

Last updated
Jim Young
Biographical details
Born (1935-04-21) April 21, 1935 (age 85)
Playing career
1954 Ohio State
1956 Bowling Green
Position(s) Fullback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1957Bowling Green (GA)
1958–1959Bowling Green (assistant)
1960–1963 Shawnee (OH)
1964–1968 Miami (OH) (assistant)
1969–1972 Michigan (DC)
1973–1976 Arizona
1977–1981 Purdue
1983–1990 Army
1992–1994 Arizona (assistant)
Head coaching record
Overall120–71–2 (college)
28–10–1 (high school)
Bowls5–1
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 WAC (1973)
Awards
WAC Coach of the Year (1973)
Big Ten Coach of the Year (1978)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1999 (profile)

Jim Young (born April 21, 1935) is a former American football player and coach. He served as the head coach at the University of Arizona (1973–1976), Purdue University (1977–1981), and the United States Military Academy (1983–1990), compiling a career college football record of 120–71–2. Young was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1999.

Contents

In addition to achieving a bowl game record of 5-1 (.833); Young was the interim coach for the Michigan Wolverines during the 1970 Rose Bowl, as Bo Schembechler was hospitalized following a mild heart attack. [1]

Coaching career

Purdue

In December 1976, Purdue University hired a 41-year-old, Young away from Arizona. [2] When Young arrived at Purdue, he named true freshman, Mark Herrmann as the team's starting quarterback, and the freshman lived up to expectations, throwing for 2,041 yards through the team's first eight games. [3] Herrmann broke the NCAA record for passing yards (2,453) and passing touchdowns (18) for freshman. [4] In 1978, Young lead Purdue to a 9–2–1 record, and a victory over Georgia Tech in the 1978 Peach Bowl. Young was named the Big Ten's Coach of the Year, the first Boilermaker head coach to ever win the award. [5] Throughout his career, Herrmann would break the Big Ten's all-time career passing yards (6,734) and passing touchdowns (48) before his senior season. [6] After a disappointing 1981 season, Young resigned from his position as head coach at Purdue, citing his desire to concentrate on athletic administration. [7]

Head coaching record

College

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffsCoaches#AP°
Arizona Wildcats (Western Athletic Conference)(1973–1976)
1973 Arizona 8–36–1T–1st
1974 Arizona 9–26–12nd
1975 Arizona 9–25–22nd1318
1976 Arizona 5–63–4T–5th
Arizona:31–1320–8
Purdue Boilermakers (Big Ten Conference)(1977–1981)
1977 Purdue 5–63–5T–6th
1978 Purdue 9–2–16–1–13rdW Peach 1313
1979 Purdue 10–27–12ndW Astro-Bluebonnet 1010
1980 Purdue 9–37–1T–2ndW Liberty 1617
1981 Purdue 5–63–6T–8th
Purdue:38–19–126–14–1
Army Black Knights (NCAA Division I-A independent)(1983–1990)
1983 Army 2–9
1984 Army 8–3–1W Cherry
1985 Army 9–3W Peach
1986 Army 6–5
1987 Army 5–6
1988 Army 9–3L Sun
1989 Army 6–5
1990 Army 6–5
Army:51–39–1
Total:120–71–2
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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References

  1. http://tucsoncitizen.com/morgue/2007/06/30/56193-corky-naming-of-award-for-ex-ua-coach-young-fitting/
  2. "Jim Young's Named New Purdue Coach". The Argus-Press. December 4, 1976. Retrieved December 16, 2013.
  3. Tracy Dodds (November 4, 1977). "Pass Fits Purdue Mold". The Milwaukee Journal. Retrieved December 16, 2013.
  4. "Purdue's Jim Young Seeks Balanced Attack". The Argus-Press. August 19, 1978. Retrieved December 16, 2013.
  5. "Young Contends Victory Changes Purdue's Image". The Palm Beach Post. December 26, 1978. Retrieved December 16, 2013.
  6. "Who's No. 1?". Reading Eagle. August 31, 1980. Retrieved December 16, 2013.
  7. "Jim Young Calls It Quits As Purdue Football Coach". The Pittsburgh Press. November 19, 1981. Retrieved December 16, 2013.